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Date: 29 Jan 2007 12:40:16
From: Jack Denver
Subject: A "recipe" for Coffee
I recently received a complimentary subscription to the digital edition of
"Saveur" magazine, which turned out to be long on style and pretension (did
they run out of English words for magazine names?) and short on substance.
In the February issue they published this "recipe" for coffee, courtesy of
the late Edna Louis, a famous Southern cook.


"Edna Lewis's Coffee

Edna Lewis's reflections on coffee in The Taste of Country Cooking are
emblematic of her affectionate approach to the food of her beloved South..
Mother made real good coffee but some mornings my father would saddle the
horse and ride more than a mile up the road to have his second cup with his
cousin Sally, who made the best coffee ever...[Are you sure it was just the
coffee, Edna?]. All cooks arrived at making good coffee from different
methods. Some added salt, some eggshells, others whites or only yolks, and
all were divine. Good coffee can be made without complicated pots and
gadgets." This recipe is an adaptation of the one in that book. Use a coffee
blend of 1/2 lb. Colombian, 1/2 lb. Java, and 1/4 lb. French roast. Put 5
level tbsp. ground coffee, a few grains of salt, and 3 3/4 cups water into a
medium pot and bring to a boil. Turn the burner down and simmer for 12-13
minutes, or longer if a stronger brew is desired. Add 1 cup ice-cold water
and remove pot from burner. Let rest a minute, then pour coffee into a
coffeepot and serve while piping hot. Serves 4. "


I realize this is supposed to be a period piece and not something they
expect you to actually make (they don't expect you to ride your horse to
Cousin Sally's house either) but some people might not get the message and
actually try to make their coffee this way.

"or longer (than 13 minutes) if a stronger brew is desired" is a
particularly nice touch.






 
Date: 01 Feb 2007 14:05:24
From: Bertie Doe
Subject: Re: A "recipe" for Coffee

"Jack Denver" wrote in message >I recently received a complimentary
subscription to the digital edition of
> "Saveur" magazine, which turned out to be long on style and pretension
> (did they run out of English words for magazine names?) and short on
> substance. In the February issue they published this "recipe" for coffee,
> courtesy of the late Edna Louis, a famous Southern cook.
> "Edna Lewis's Coffee
>
Pity I hadn't seen this recipe 10 years ago, would have saved me a fortune
in shiny toys.
You realise the impact on the PID ket, that Edna could cause??
Bertie




 
Date: 29 Jan 2007 16:50:33
From: Nate Clark
Subject: I-Roast2 demise
I have been lurking here most of the last 4 years and have been amazed
at the level of passion and dedication to coffee I've found in this group.

During this time I've had a goal of at least "pretty good coffee"
(brewed) that I've never really been able to reach - I've achieved only
glimpses of excellence out of my own coffee at most 2 or 3 times - but
it was soooo good that I knew I had to learn how to repeat that on at
least a semi-regular basis.

But now I've had a setback which actually, I think turns out to be an
opportunity. If I've learned anything in my attempts to make good cofee
- it is that it is a very complex endeavor requiring very close
attention to detail, data collection, and tracking.

The other day (finally to the point) I fried my I-Roast 2. I was
fiddling with the variac and it seemed to be arcing quite a bit inside
(which I guess may be a defect) - though I didn't think I sent more than
120 volts to my I-Roast 2 - the plume of fried-electronics smoke rising
up the bean container indicated otherwise.

That was a sad moment, on a par with cracking the bowl of my Hario
Neuveou (sp ?). As an aside - anyone know where to get one of those ?

However, consulting this group, I find a post on "PIDing a roaster?" and
immediately realized this might actually be a very good opportunity.

Tearing the I-Roast completely apart - I find that the heater elements
and fan were both unaffected by the disaster ! The "logic" in the system
seemed to work but no signal to control the fan would come out of it,
i.e., a roast profile would start and count down and I could see the
heating elements go on and off in an "ordered" way, but the fan didn't
go. (But, by hooking the fan up to direct AC - I verified that it indeed
does work)

FWIW - during the teardown - I also found a rubber gasket was
improperly placed in it's seat between the base and heating element - a
clear manufacturing defect and possible indication of why I had little
luck with roasting.

I apologize for the length of this intro - but what I want to do is not
necessarily to PID the roaster, I see a great deal of info on that here
but it seems clear that the existing (working) roaster is the foundation
which PIDing is built on.

What I want to do is to completely replace the guts of the I-Roast and
control the fan and heating elements from a PC using software that I can
write to control whatever hardware I need to a) put in the PC itself
(expansion card), or b) control over usb/serial.

This would be in an x86 PC using whatever OS, linux, Windows, (OS/2 ? (I
wish)). In the end - I envision dedicating the whole machine to running
this roaster - with a complete user interface and the ability to collect
and track timing and temperature data as well as capturing a user's
perception of the quality of each roast.

I just don't know where to start ! Particularly from the hardware
perspective.

I have seen Ian's excellent example and gone through his very
informative website. The difference here is, though, I want to put an
entire computer around this (If Ian's box could communicate with a
computer, perhaps that's where I should start ?)

I've also seen Jeffrey Pawlan's computer control Hottop - now *thats*
what I want to do - though I'd rather write all the software (that is
what I do for a living) than use LabView.

If anyone knows of what hardware I might start with here it would be a
great help ! If necessary, I can build it myself if there's a kit out
there.

Thanks,

Nate Clark





  
Date: 29 Jan 2007 16:53:26
From: Nate Clark
Subject: Re: I-Roast2 demise
Aaach - My first post and I mess it up !

Sorry - thought if I did a reply and changed the subject line it would
form a new post ! Guess not, will repost out of this subject

apologies to all


 
Date: 29 Jan 2007 13:32:00
From: Dan
Subject: Re: A "recipe" for Coffee


On Jan 29, 5:40 pm, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net > wrote:

>." This recipe is an adaptation of the one in that book. Use a coffee
> blend of 1/2 lb. Colombian, 1/2 lb. Java, and 1/4 lb. French roast. Put 5

what beans would "french roast" be then??



  
Date: 29 Jan 2007 17:56:30
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: A "recipe" for Coffee
"French roast" is in the bin that is between "espresso" and "decaf", duh.

Note the proportions also. If a level TB of coffee weighs 5 grams (and
that's being optimistic), the recipe gives you a brew strength of 25 g in
4 3/4 cups (38 oz. or even if you are using 6 oz. "cups" , 28 oz) of water,
which is less than half of SCAA recommended brew strength. No wonder you
need to boil this mixture for 13 minutes or more to get something that does
not look like tea.

I read further into the magazine and by coincidence later on in the same
issue they have a 12 page pullout section on specialty coffee including very
favorable mention of Don S. and the SCAA, which is considerably better than
Edna's "recipe".

One ironic thing that I've found is that people who are very good at what
they do (which in the case of Edna Lewis was southern cooking) are as
ignorant as the rest of us when they wander "off the reservation" of their
specialized area of knowledge. So run away if Dame Edna tries to tell you
how to brew coffee and if Don S. tries to tell you the best way to cook a
Smithfield ham, don't listen to him either.





"Dan" <daniel_roach@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:1170106320.687764.305030@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>
>
> On Jan 29, 5:40 pm, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
>
>>." This recipe is an adaptation of the one in that book. Use a coffee
>> blend of 1/2 lb. Colombian, 1/2 lb. Java, and 1/4 lb. French roast. Put 5
>
> what beans would "french roast" be then??
>




   
Date: 31 Jan 2007 10:53:20
From: Danny O'Keefe
Subject: Re: A "recipe" for Coffee
Has Don got a recipe for Smithfield ham?


"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:buKdnbYoC7gC5iPYnZ2dnUVZ_vmqnZ2d@comcast.com...
> "French roast" is in the bin that is between "espresso" and "decaf", duh.
>
> Note the proportions also. If a level TB of coffee weighs 5 grams (and
> that's being optimistic), the recipe gives you a brew strength of 25 g
> in 4 3/4 cups (38 oz. or even if you are using 6 oz. "cups" , 28 oz) of
> water, which is less than half of SCAA recommended brew strength. No
> wonder you need to boil this mixture for 13 minutes or more to get
> something that does not look like tea.
>
> I read further into the magazine and by coincidence later on in the same
> issue they have a 12 page pullout section on specialty coffee including
> very favorable mention of Don S. and the SCAA, which is considerably
> better than Edna's "recipe".
>
> One ironic thing that I've found is that people who are very good at what
> they do (which in the case of Edna Lewis was southern cooking) are as
> ignorant as the rest of us when they wander "off the reservation" of their
> specialized area of knowledge. So run away if Dame Edna tries to tell you
> how to brew coffee and if Don S. tries to tell you the best way to cook a
> Smithfield ham, don't listen to him either.
>
>
>
>
>
> "Dan" <daniel_roach@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1170106320.687764.305030@a34g2000cwb.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>
>> On Jan 29, 5:40 pm, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
>>
>>>." This recipe is an adaptation of the one in that book. Use a coffee
>>> blend of 1/2 lb. Colombian, 1/2 lb. Java, and 1/4 lb. French roast. Put
>>> 5
>>
>> what beans would "french roast" be then??
>>
>
>




 
Date: 29 Jan 2007 13:02:13
From: mattw
Subject: Re: A "recipe" for Coffee
My wife would call it 'quaint'. I call it heresy.

/mw

On Jan 29, 12:40 pm, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net > wrote:
> I recently received a complimentary subscription to the digital edition of
> "Saveur" magazine, which turned out to be long on style and pretension (did
> they run out of English words for magazine names?) and short on substance.
> In the February issue they published this "recipe" for coffee, courtesy of
> the late Edna Louis, a famous Southern cook.
>
> "Edna Lewis's Coffee
>
> Edna Lewis's reflections on coffee in The Taste of Country Cooking are
> emblematic of her affectionate approach to the food of her beloved South..
> Mother made real good coffee but some mornings my father would saddle the
> horse and ride more than a mile up the road to have his second cup with his
> cousin Sally, who made the best coffee ever...[Are you sure it was just the
> coffee, Edna?]. All cooks arrived at making good coffee from different
> methods. Some added salt, some eggshells, others whites or only yolks, and
> all were divine. Good coffee can be made without complicated pots and
> gadgets." This recipe is an adaptation of the one in that book. Use a coffee
> blend of 1/2 lb. Colombian, 1/2 lb. Java, and 1/4 lb. French roast. Put 5
> level tbsp. ground coffee, a few grains of salt, and 3 3/4 cups water into a
> medium pot and bring to a boil. Turn the burner down and simmer for 12-13
> minutes, or longer if a stronger brew is desired. Add 1 cup ice-cold water
> and remove pot from burner. Let rest a minute, then pour coffee into a
> coffeepot and serve while piping hot. Serves 4. "
>
> I realize this is supposed to be a period piece and not something they
> expect you to actually make (they don't expect you to ride your horse to
> Cousin Sally's house either) but some people might not get the message and
> actually try to make their coffee this way.
>
> "or longer (than 13 minutes) if a stronger brew is desired" is a
> particularly nice touch.



 
Date: 29 Jan 2007 12:07:36
From: Paul Allen
Subject: Re: A "recipe" for Coffee
Jack Denver wrote:
> "Edna Lewis's Coffee

I think I had some of that at Olive Garden...