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Date: 06 Mar 2007 16:55:48
From: Peter in New Zealand
Subject: Aeropress still in use?
Last year I managed to buy an Aeropress and got all excited over it. There's
a couple of things about it that irritate me though.

Using the supplied paper filters I found that about half the water just
falls through before you start plunging, err, pressing. I fixed that problem
with the help of a suggestion on this group to make coffee in it upside
down, and whip it right way up over the cup when ready to press. Sure gets
the visitor's attention, especially when I misjudge it and spray coffee all
over the e\bench.

Then I threw away the little paper disks and substituted a fine stainless
steel mesh disk, since I like a little bit of sediment anyway. Now it works
OK, and makes coffee just like my plunger, so why do I bother with it? As a
matter of fact I don't any more. I found the Aeropress on the shelf today,
covered in dust and looking neglected. Meanwhile I box on happily with the
little old plunger pot, and wonder why I spend all that money on the thing.

Now that the Aeropress has been around for a little while are there any
comments born out of experience about the thing? Or am I just an old
fashioned middle-aged computer geek who is too stubborn to persist with new
technology?

(Thinks - man would I love one of those bright shiny home expresso machines
costing hundreds of dollars - dream on.)

--
Peter in New Zealand. (Pull the plug out to reply.)
Collector of old cameras, tropical fish fancier, good coffee nutter, and
compulsive computer fiddler.






 
Date: 06 Mar 2007 14:59:10
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?
On 6, 3:52 pm, "Anon" <a...@anon.com > wrote:

> Is there any place that sells the filter material in small quantities? I
> checked out fdpp.com and only found large quantities, over $100 for a box of
> filter bags.

I don't know about selling, but I'll send you some free. ;-)

McMaster-Carr has some that's pretty clean, but it's not seared on one
side. Still, that's what I started exploring this material's virtues
with, and it performs the same as the seared stuff. it's a bit more
fuzzy, though -- the surface qualities don't seem quite as well
controlled for. But you could order any amount you like.

- Scott



 
Date: 06 Mar 2007 12:47:18
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?
On 6, 8:51 am, "Karl" <karlmiltonr...@yahoo.com > wrote:
> > My writeup on this is already in serious need of redaction:http://quardts.org/Coffee/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffee.html
>
> Anyone have a source for small quantities of Five micron polyester
> felt filtering media Scott recommends? In the US?

I've found midwestfilter.com and fdpp.com to be reliable sources of
clean material. The best thing you can do for small quantities is to
ask for a sample bag filter. I'd like to sell rounds, but I'm still
waiting on the pedigree of a recent sample from another vendor.
Frankly, my own taste testing (unwashed) shows no difference --
ostensibly FDA grade material and non-FDA have the same *slight* taste
on first use, reminiscent of a cheap leisure suit rack in a two-bit
department store.

LOL

I counsel a hot rinse before using the first time.

Send me your e-mail addy and I'll fire off a sample to you, of the
fdpp.com stuff.
first dot last at gmail.

I use it for Aeros, but I also use it on weekends at the church, in a
somewhat insane way, to brew for numbers. Cleanup for re-use is a
pain, but for numbers it's worth it. Cleanup of individual Aero rounds
isn't onerous, IMO.

- S



  
Date: 06 Mar 2007 13:52:19
From: Anon
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?

"rasqual" <scott.quardt@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1173214038.058834.185280@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
> On 6, 8:51 am, "Karl" <karlmiltonr...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>> > My writeup on this is already in serious need of
>> > redaction:http://quardts.org/Coffee/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffee.html
>>
>> Anyone have a source for small quantities of Five micron polyester
>> felt filtering media Scott recommends? In the US?
>
> I've found midwestfilter.com and fdpp.com to be reliable sources of
> clean material. The best thing you can do for small quantities is to
> ask for a sample bag filter. I'd like to sell rounds, but I'm still
> waiting on the pedigree of a recent sample from another vendor.
> Frankly, my own taste testing (unwashed) shows no difference --
> ostensibly FDA grade material and non-FDA have the same *slight* taste
> on first use, reminiscent of a cheap leisure suit rack in a two-bit
> department store.
>
> LOL
>
> I counsel a hot rinse before using the first time.
>
> Send me your e-mail addy and I'll fire off a sample to you, of the
> fdpp.com stuff.
> first dot last at gmail.
>
> I use it for Aeros, but I also use it on weekends at the church, in a
> somewhat insane way, to brew for numbers. Cleanup for re-use is a
> pain, but for numbers it's worth it. Cleanup of individual Aero rounds
> isn't onerous, IMO.
>
> - S
>

Is there any place that sells the filter material in small quantities? I
checked out fdpp.com and only found large quantities, over $100 for a box of
filter bags.





   
Date: 07 Mar 2007 13:17:31
From: Randall Nortman
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?
On 2007-03-06, Anon <anon@anon.com > wrote:
>
> "rasqual" <scott.quardt@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1173214038.058834.185280@s48g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
>> On 6, 8:51 am, "Karl" <karlmiltonr...@yahoo.com> wrote:
>>> > My writeup on this is already in serious need of
>>> > redaction:http://quardts.org/Coffee/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffee.html
>>>
>>> Anyone have a source for small quantities of Five micron polyester
>>> felt filtering media Scott recommends? In the US?
[...]
> Is there any place that sells the filter material in small quantities? I
> checked out fdpp.com and only found large quantities, over $100 for a box of
> filter bags.

I can't vouch for use as a coffee filter, but smallparts.com has
various sorts of filter material, and they do small orders.

--
Randall


 
Date: 06 Mar 2007 06:51:08
From: Karl
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?
> My writeup on this is already in serious need of redaction:http://quardts.org/Coffee/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffee.html

Anyone have a source for small quantities of Five micron polyester
felt filtering media Scott recommends? In the US?

Karl



 
Date: 06 Mar 2007 06:12:12
From: dcrehr
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?
No frustration here. I don't know what I am doing "right," but wash
through, as you call it, is insignificant. I use it many times a
week. It still makes about the best-tasting cup of all my brewing
methods. It is more concentrated and rich than others, so not what I
want all the time. I consider it a vel.

DR



 
Date: 05 Mar 2007 22:24:41
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?
On 5, 9:55 pm, "Peter in New Zealand" <peterbalp...@xtra.co.nz >
wrote:
> Last year I managed to buy an Aeropress and got all excited over it. There's
> a couple of things about it that irritate me though.
>
> Using the supplied paper filters I found that about half the water just
> falls through before you start plunging, err, pressing. I fixed that problem
> with the help of a suggestion on this group to make coffee in it upside
> down, and whip it right way up over the cup when ready to press. Sure gets
> the visitor's attention, especially when I misjudge it and spray coffee all
> over the e\bench.

I advocate inversion, but for entirely different purposes. In fact, I
discourage inversion for your reasons. I'd suggest grinding finer
until you no longer have such wash-through. Grind MUCH finer, then
work your way between to find a median grind where you only get a
tablespoon or two of wash-through. Also, use a lot more water than the
directions call for -- unless you're drinking it strong and want your
cup that way.

> Then I threw away the little paper disks and substituted a fine stainless
> steel mesh disk, since I like a little bit of sediment anyway. Now it works
> OK, and makes coffee just like my plunger, so why do I bother with it? As a
> matter of fact I don't any more. I found the Aeropress on the shelf today,
> covered in dust and looking neglected. Meanwhile I box on happily with the
> little old plunger pot, and wonder why I spend all that money on the thing.
>
> Now that the Aeropress has been around for a little while are there any
> comments born out of experience about the thing? Or am I just an old
> fashioned middle-aged computer geek who is too stubborn to persist with new
> technology?

My writeup on this is already in serious need of redaction:
http://quardts.org/Coffee/invertedaeropressingforbettercoffee.html

It's also possible to do cake extraction and obtain an oily cup
without inversion. In a nutshell, you can get any combination of
turbidity and oils you want. You can have no oils with high or low
turbidity (or clear), you can get some oils with (etc.), or you can
get a lot of oils with (etc.). This is all just with variations in
pressing method, and technique (I distinguish them). See the Aeropress
thread at CG for a LOT of ongoing tweaks and hacks.

Personally, I don't like fines if they embitter the bottom of the cup
-- though I enjoy some turbidity on occasion. But as for the
Aeropress, it's the only thing I use anymore to make coffee, unless
I'm doing a manual pourover for numbers. I vary brewing parameters
depending on roast depth and grind, vary the filter depending on what
combination mentioned above interests me for a particular origin or
whim, and vary method and technique as well. I brew in two very
different environments -- one where I use 180 degree water, and the
other where I use 205. I have to adjust how I brew accordingly.

As a rule I don't use paper, either -- but I eschew metal. However, I
think I'll experiment with metal a bit more with puck extraction.
Always something new to try, even after imagining I've done it all
with this thing!

But then, I've been known to hammer nails with crescent wrenches,
too . . .

;-)

- Scott



  
Date: 06 Mar 2007 22:21:41
From: Peter in New Zealand
Subject: Re: Aeropress still in use?

> But then, I've been known to hammer nails with crescent wrenches,
> too . . .
>
> ;-)
>
> - Scott

Ah, now before I respond with a torrent of novel uses for various
implements, I must say that you encourage me to have another go. Maybe I
gave up too soon on the thing. I will try the finer grind, as I tend to have
got into the habit of automatically grinding for plunger. Still like a
little puddle of murk in the bottom though. It's too late at night to risk
caffeine now, but I'll give it another whirl for my morning hit and post
back. Thanks.

--
Peter in New Zealand. (Pull the plug out to reply.)
Collector of old cameras, tropical fish fancier, good coffee nutter, and
compulsive computer fiddler.