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Date: 18 Mar 2007 04:59:39
From: Travesso
Subject: Air Particles
Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
ground espresso dust in the air around employees?





 
Date: 20 Mar 2007 12:58:04
From: Dr. HotSalt
Subject: Re: Air Particles
On 20, 9:47 am, "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> On 20, 12:28 pm, "Otto Bahn" <e...@eio.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in
>
> > > > Yes, its called OSHA! Particulate matter, even if benign, is a health hazard
> > > > for employees. However, the amount produced by a grinder is next to nil. There
> > > > are tests and action levels that are used to determine if your employees should
> > > > wear respirators or not. But, since I've yet to see a baker wearing a dust mask
> > > > at my local bread shop, where much more dust is present, I don't think Starbucks
> > > > will be issuing logo imprinted green dust masks anytime soon. Dan
>
> > > > "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>
> > > >news:1174219179.552153.180220@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
>
> > > > > Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> > > > > ground espresso dust in the air around employees?- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > > - Show quoted text -
>
> > > I was not thinking that OSHA would be concerned with dust. I was more
> > > wondering if they might treat it like they do diatomaceous earth.
> > > When OSHA worries about dust they mostly want to:
>
> > > Reduce employee exposure to dust
> > > Comply with health and air emission standards
> > > Reduce nuisance and dust exposure to neighbors
> > > Recover valuable products from the air
>
> > > But with silica, asbestos, and other things OSHA is worried about
> > > something totally different.
>
> > > Let me make my question longer.
> > > The Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 7, July 2000
> > > had a story:
> > > "The team then varied the coffee grounds' consistency. They found that
> > > coarse coffee grounds removed 73% of the copper and 79% of the lead.
> > > In comparison, finely ground coffee powder removed 90% of copper and
> > > 91% of lead, suggesting that the increased surface area of the smaller
> > > grounds enhances removal of the metals. A moister bed of coffee also
> > > increased how much metal was adsorbed, as demonstrated by collecting
> > > samples of the coffee as it passed through the coffee bed and
> > > comparing their metal concentrations to those of the finished pot.
> > > Allen says that sorption of the metals may also occur on interior
> > > surfaces of the coffee maker, paper filter, or glass carafe."
>
> > > This makes coffee sound a lot like diatomaceous earth.
>
> > That's crabby talk. Try brewing a cup of diatomaceous
> > earth and let us know how it is.
>
> > --oTTo--- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> I am not saying it makes the coffee sound like an inferior product, I
> am saying that it made me wonder if long-term exposure to very fine
> coffee grounds don't pose at least some level of a health concern for
> some individuals susceptible to lung problems.

Silicosis, emphysema, etc. occur when inorganic silica dust is
encased in fibrous tissue that takes up space formerly occupied by
alveoli because it defeats the dust-removal mechanisms in the lungs.
What happens to coffee, flour, or other organic dusts in the lungs?


Dr. HotSalt



  
Date: 20 Mar 2007 16:02:53
From: Otto Bahn
Subject: Re: Air Particles
"Dr. HotSalt" <Alien8752@gmail.com > wrote

> > > > > Yes, its called OSHA! Particulate matter, even if benign, is a health hazard
> > > > > for employees. However, the amount produced by a grinder is next to nil. There
> > > > > are tests and action levels that are used to determine if your employees should
> > > > > wear respirators or not. But, since I've yet to see a baker wearing a dust mask
> > > > > at my local bread shop, where much more dust is present, I don't think Starbucks
> > > > > will be issuing logo imprinted green dust masks anytime soon. Dan
> >
> > > > > "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >
> > > > >news:1174219179.552153.180220@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > > > > > Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> > > > > > ground espresso dust in the air around employees?- Hide quoted text -
> >
> > > > > - Show quoted text -
> >
> > > > I was not thinking that OSHA would be concerned with dust. I was more
> > > > wondering if they might treat it like they do diatomaceous earth.
> > > > When OSHA worries about dust they mostly want to:
> >
> > > > Reduce employee exposure to dust
> > > > Comply with health and air emission standards
> > > > Reduce nuisance and dust exposure to neighbors
> > > > Recover valuable products from the air
> >
> > > > But with silica, asbestos, and other things OSHA is worried about
> > > > something totally different.
> >
> > > > Let me make my question longer.
> > > > The Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 7, July 2000
> > > > had a story:
> > > > "The team then varied the coffee grounds' consistency. They found that
> > > > coarse coffee grounds removed 73% of the copper and 79% of the lead.
> > > > In comparison, finely ground coffee powder removed 90% of copper and
> > > > 91% of lead, suggesting that the increased surface area of the smaller
> > > > grounds enhances removal of the metals. A moister bed of coffee also
> > > > increased how much metal was adsorbed, as demonstrated by collecting
> > > > samples of the coffee as it passed through the coffee bed and
> > > > comparing their metal concentrations to those of the finished pot.
> > > > Allen says that sorption of the metals may also occur on interior
> > > > surfaces of the coffee maker, paper filter, or glass carafe."
> >
> > > > This makes coffee sound a lot like diatomaceous earth.
> >
> > > That's crabby talk. Try brewing a cup of diatomaceous
> > > earth and let us know how it is.
> >
> > > --oTTo--- Hide quoted text -
> >
> > > - Show quoted text -
> >
> > I am not saying it makes the coffee sound like an inferior product, I
> > am saying that it made me wonder if long-term exposure to very fine
> > coffee grounds don't pose at least some level of a health concern for
> > some individuals susceptible to lung problems.
>
> Silicosis, emphysema, etc. occur when inorganic silica dust is
> encased in fibrous tissue that takes up space formerly occupied by
> alveoli because it defeats the dust-removal mechanisms in the lungs.
> What happens to coffee, flour, or other organic dusts in the lungs?

Dust mites?

--oTTo--


   
Date: 21 Mar 2007 09:02:02
From: Teh Most Revernd Bishop of Willesden
Subject: Re: Air Particles
Otto Bahn wrote:
> "Dr. HotSalt" <Alien8752@gmail.com> wrote


>> What happens to coffee, flour, or other organic dusts in the lungs?
>
> Dust mites?


Yes, it probably doeses.


--
That's_ the message; "Donut sit behind leaning cats that have just
farted you blind"!

Dr HotSalt in A.R.K.


 
Date: 20 Mar 2007 09:47:06
From: Travesso
Subject: Re: Air Particles
On 20, 12:28 pm, "Otto Bahn" <e...@eio.com > wrote:
> "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in
>
>
>
>
>
> > > Yes, its called OSHA! Particulate matter, even if benign, is a health hazard
> > > for employees. However, the amount produced by a grinder is next to nil. There
> > > are tests and action levels that are used to determine if your employees should
> > > wear respirators or not. But, since I've yet to see a baker wearing a dust mask
> > > at my local bread shop, where much more dust is present, I don't think Starbucks
> > > will be issuing logo imprinted green dust masks anytime soon. Dan
>
> > > "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>
> > >news:1174219179.552153.180220@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
>
> > > > Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> > > > ground espresso dust in the air around employees?- Hide quoted text -
>
> > > - Show quoted text -
>
> > I was not thinking that OSHA would be concerned with dust. I was more
> > wondering if they might treat it like they do diatomaceous earth.
> > When OSHA worries about dust they mostly want to:
>
> > Reduce employee exposure to dust
> > Comply with health and air emission standards
> > Reduce nuisance and dust exposure to neighbors
> > Recover valuable products from the air
>
> > But with silica, asbestos, and other things OSHA is worried about
> > something totally different.
>
> > Let me make my question longer.
> > The Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 7, July 2000
> > had a story:
> > "The team then varied the coffee grounds' consistency. They found that
> > coarse coffee grounds removed 73% of the copper and 79% of the lead.
> > In comparison, finely ground coffee powder removed 90% of copper and
> > 91% of lead, suggesting that the increased surface area of the smaller
> > grounds enhances removal of the metals. A moister bed of coffee also
> > increased how much metal was adsorbed, as demonstrated by collecting
> > samples of the coffee as it passed through the coffee bed and
> > comparing their metal concentrations to those of the finished pot.
> > Allen says that sorption of the metals may also occur on interior
> > surfaces of the coffee maker, paper filter, or glass carafe."
>
> > This makes coffee sound a lot like diatomaceous earth.
>
> That's crabby talk. Try brewing a cup of diatomaceous
> earth and let us know how it is.
>
> --oTTo--- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I am not saying it makes the coffee sound like an inferior product, I
am saying that it made me wonder if long-term exposure to very fine
coffee grounds don't pose at least some level of a health concern for
some individuals susceptible to lung problems.



 
Date: 19 Mar 2007 04:47:13
From: Travesso
Subject: Re: Air Particles
On 18, 10:34 am, "Dan Bollinger"
<danNObollin...@insightSPAMbb.com > wrote:
> Yes, its called OSHA! Particulate matter, even if benign, is a health hazard
> for employees. However, the amount produced by a grinder is next to nil. There
> are tests and action levels that are used to determine if your employees should
> wear respirators or not. But, since I've yet to see a baker wearing a dust mask
> at my local bread shop, where much more dust is present, I don't think Starbucks
> will be issuing logo imprinted green dust masks anytime soon. Dan
>
> "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1174219179.552153.180220@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
>
>
>
> > Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> > ground espresso dust in the air around employees?- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I was not thinking that OSHA would be concerned with dust. I was more
wondering if they might treat it like they do diatomaceous earth.
When OSHA worries about dust they mostly want to:

Reduce employee exposure to dust
Comply with health and air emission standards
Reduce nuisance and dust exposure to neighbors
Recover valuable products from the air

But with silica, asbestos, and other things OSHA is worried about
something totally different.

Let me make my question longer.
The Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 7, July 2000
had a story:
"The team then varied the coffee grounds' consistency. They found that
coarse coffee grounds removed 73% of the copper and 79% of the lead.
In comparison, finely ground coffee powder removed 90% of copper and
91% of lead, suggesting that the increased surface area of the smaller
grounds enhances removal of the metals. A moister bed of coffee also
increased how much metal was adsorbed, as demonstrated by collecting
samples of the coffee as it passed through the coffee bed and
comparing their metal concentrations to those of the finished pot.
Allen says that sorption of the metals may also occur on interior
surfaces of the coffee maker, paper filter, or glass carafe."

This makes coffee sound a lot like diatomaceous earth. I don't think
coffee has any silica in it, but I wonder how finely ground espresso
acts on the lungs if you inhale it?




  
Date: 20 Mar 2007 12:28:22
From: Otto Bahn
Subject: Re: Air Particles
"Travesso" <cpasoren@hotmail.com > wrote in

> > Yes, its called OSHA! Particulate matter, even if benign, is a health hazard
> > for employees. However, the amount produced by a grinder is next to nil. There
> > are tests and action levels that are used to determine if your employees should
> > wear respirators or not. But, since I've yet to see a baker wearing a dust mask
> > at my local bread shop, where much more dust is present, I don't think Starbucks
> > will be issuing logo imprinted green dust masks anytime soon. Dan
> >
> > "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> >
> > news:1174219179.552153.180220@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
> >
> >
> >
> > > Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> > > ground espresso dust in the air around employees?- Hide quoted text -
> >
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> I was not thinking that OSHA would be concerned with dust. I was more
> wondering if they might treat it like they do diatomaceous earth.
> When OSHA worries about dust they mostly want to:
>
> Reduce employee exposure to dust
> Comply with health and air emission standards
> Reduce nuisance and dust exposure to neighbors
> Recover valuable products from the air
>
> But with silica, asbestos, and other things OSHA is worried about
> something totally different.
>
> Let me make my question longer.
> The Environmental Health Perspectives Volume 108, Number 7, July 2000
> had a story:
> "The team then varied the coffee grounds' consistency. They found that
> coarse coffee grounds removed 73% of the copper and 79% of the lead.
> In comparison, finely ground coffee powder removed 90% of copper and
> 91% of lead, suggesting that the increased surface area of the smaller
> grounds enhances removal of the metals. A moister bed of coffee also
> increased how much metal was adsorbed, as demonstrated by collecting
> samples of the coffee as it passed through the coffee bed and
> comparing their metal concentrations to those of the finished pot.
> Allen says that sorption of the metals may also occur on interior
> surfaces of the coffee maker, paper filter, or glass carafe."
>
> This makes coffee sound a lot like diatomaceous earth.

That's crabby talk. Try brewing a cup of diatomaceous
earth and let us know how it is.

--oTTo--


 
Date: 18 Mar 2007 09:06:49
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Air Particles
On 18, 7:59 am, "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com > wrote:
> Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> ground espresso dust in the air around employees?

I thought I had heard it all -- until now.

dave



  
Date: 19 Mar 2007 02:58:06
From: Lavarock
Subject: Re: Air Particles
daveb wrote:
> On 18, 7:59 am, "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
>> ground espresso dust in the air around employees?
>
> I thought I had heard it all -- until now.
>
> dave
>

So, I'm guessing you missed the car show on Spike network today, where
the EPA contracted for a Superbee (the car with the funny front air dam
and the funnier spoiler). It chased a plane down the runway to measure
particulate matter. They believe the data they captured led to the
demise of muscle cars.

Why they didn't just put a test unit on the back of the plane, i dunno.

--

They said that someone has to live in Hawaii and I raised my hand first!


   
Date: 19 Mar 2007 08:08:42
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Air Particles
Lavarock <lavarock1@myhawaiiansite.com > wrote:



    
Date: 20 Mar 2007 21:16:38
From: Lavarock
Subject: Re: Air Particles
D. Ross wrote:
> Lavarock <lavarock1@myhawaiiansite.com> wrote:
>
>


     
Date: 21 Mar 2007 01:53:29
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Air Particles



  
Date: 18 Mar 2007 17:21:43
From: The Other Funk
Subject: Re: Air Particles
Finding the keyboard operational
daveb entered:

> On 18, 7:59 am, "Travesso" <cpaso...@hotmail.com> wrote:
>> Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
>> ground espresso dust in the air around employees?
>
> I thought I had heard it all -- until now.
>
> dave

I know that after a couple of hours of roasting I start etting a caffine
buzz even without drinking coffee.
I am sure that the government will let us know how bad coffee dust is. I
hope they don't make me take the roaster out of the store.
Bob

--
--
Coffee worth staying up for - NY Times
www.moondoggiecoffee.com



 
Date: 18 Mar 2007 09:34:00
From: Dan Bollinger
Subject: Re: Air Particles
Yes, its called OSHA! Particulate matter, even if benign, is a health hazard
for employees. However, the amount produced by a grinder is next to nil. There
are tests and action levels that are used to determine if your employees should
wear respirators or not. But, since I've yet to see a baker wearing a dust mask
at my local bread shop, where much more dust is present, I don't think Starbucks
will be issuing logo imprinted green dust masks anytime soon. Dan



"Travesso" <cpasoren@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:1174219179.552153.180220@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
> Has anyone heard of any government agency being worried about fine
> ground espresso dust in the air around employees?
>