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Date: 06 Oct 2006 08:37:21
From:
Subject: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
I haven't dropped by Google Books since it first 'opened' so I thought
I'd poke around and see if they had anymore content than last time. I
typed in coffee with the "Full view books" radio button selected and
was surprised to see the oft mentioned Ukers text appear. I haven't
been able to get my hands on a hardcopy of this despite keeping my eyes
open for it whenever I'm in a library as it comes very recommended.

You can only use Google's viewer in a browser window with this one.
Most of the full view books can be downloaded as PDF, but for some
reason it doesn't give that option for this one.

http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC01724889&id=Y5tXt7aoLNoC&printsec=titlepage&as_brr=1
or
http://tinyurl.com/oc

Matthew





 
Date: 06 Oct 2006 11:45:01
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books

<mandtprice@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1160149041.084138.21750@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>I haven't dropped by Google Books since it first 'opened' so I thought
> I'd poke around and see if they had anymore content than last time. I
> typed in coffee with the "Full view books" radio button selected and
> was surprised to see the oft mentioned Ukers text appear. I haven't
> been able to get my hands on a hardcopy of this despite keeping my
> eyes
> open for it whenever I'm in a library as it comes very recommended.
>
> You can only use Google's viewer in a browser window with this one.
> Most of the full view books can be downloaded as PDF, but for some
> reason it doesn't give that option for this one.
>
> http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC01724889&id=Y5tXt7aoLNoC&printsec=titlepage&as_brr=1
> or
> http://tinyurl.com/oc
>
> Matthew
>

I haven't looked today, but I bought mine from the SCAA bookstore.,
become a member & save more. {:-)
Craig.



  
Date: 07 Oct 2006 17:06:58
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
Someone else posted it a long time ago -

it's the 1935 edition and it's 70 megs :

http://www.coffeewisdom.com/all_about_coffee/all_about_coffee.pdf

Google is supposed to let you have the full text of anything out of
copyright and the Ukers they have is from 1922, which is old enough to be in
the public domain - anything before 1923 is public domain at this point.
When Congress passed the "Disney Company Protection Act of 1998", anthing
older than 75 years at that point had already passed into the public domain
and Congress did not revive the copyright (legally questionable if they
could have even if they wanted to). Luckily Steamboat Willie (and thus the
character of Mickey Mouse) was released in 1928 and now is protected (in
the US) for a full century until 2028 (at which time Congress might decide
to extend the copyright laws some more). The Constitution says that
copyrights are for a "limited time" but leaves it up to Congress to say what
that is and so far the courts have refused to intervene. Someone once asked
Jack Valenti, the head of the MPAA how long he thought a "limited time"
should be and he replied to effect that one day before the end of the world
would be suitable.







"Craig Andrews" <alt.coffee@deletethis.rogers.com > wrote in message
news:4onc11Ff8tr3U1@individual.net...
>
> <mandtprice@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1160149041.084138.21750@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>>I haven't dropped by Google Books since it first 'opened' so I thought
>> I'd poke around and see if they had anymore content than last time. I
>> typed in coffee with the "Full view books" radio button selected and
>> was surprised to see the oft mentioned Ukers text appear. I haven't
>> been able to get my hands on a hardcopy of this despite keeping my eyes
>> open for it whenever I'm in a library as it comes very recommended.
>>
>> You can only use Google's viewer in a browser window with this one.
>> Most of the full view books can be downloaded as PDF, but for some
>> reason it doesn't give that option for this one.
>>
>> http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC01724889&id=Y5tXt7aoLNoC&printsec=titlepage&as_brr=1
>> or
>> http://tinyurl.com/oc
>>
>> Matthew
>>
>
> I haven't looked today, but I bought mine from the SCAA bookstore., become
> a member & save more. {:-)
> Craig.




   
Date: 08 Oct 2006 01:53:50
From: Alan
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:aaydnfeIaehui7XYnZ2dnUVZ_rCdnZ2d@comcast.com...
> Someone else posted it a long time ago -
>
> it's the 1935 edition and it's 70 megs :
>
> http://www.coffeewisdom.com/all_about_coffee/all_about_coffee.pdf

I thought it interesting that as exhaustive a study as it appears to be, not
a single mention of espresso was made . . .




    
Date: 08 Oct 2006 00:16:44
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
As of 1935 there probably wasn't a single espresso machine in all of the US
or maybe one at Cafffe Reggio in Greenwich Village (of course any "espresso"
machine would have been what we would call a giant steam toy - 1 or 2 bar
pressure and no crema). It just wasn't on the radar. Probably not one
American in a thousand (other than immigrants) had been to Italy. It was
nothing like the "global village" we live in today.




"Alan" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:OSYVg.9846$vJ2.6438@newssvr12.news.prodigy.com...
>
> "Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net> wrote in message
> news:aaydnfeIaehui7XYnZ2dnUVZ_rCdnZ2d@comcast.com...
>> Someone else posted it a long time ago -
>>
>> it's the 1935 edition and it's 70 megs :
>>
>> http://www.coffeewisdom.com/all_about_coffee/all_about_coffee.pdf
>
> I thought it interesting that as exhaustive a study as it appears to be,
> not a single mention of espresso was made . . .
>




     
Date: 08 Oct 2006 05:56:31
From: Alan
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:K9KdnecoUJgw5rXYnZ2dnUVZ_tSdnZ2d@comcast.com...
> As of 1935 there probably wasn't a single espresso machine in all of the
> US or maybe one at Cafffe Reggio in Greenwich Village (of course any
> "espresso" machine would have been what we would call a giant steam toy -
> 1 or 2 bar pressure and no crema). It just wasn't on the radar. Probably
> not one American in a thousand (other than immigrants) had been to Italy.
> It was nothing like the "global village" we live in today.

Well yes, but considering that the author did not limit himself to the US,
and wrote over 100 pages of minutely detailed descriptions of preparation
of coffee in Algeria, Egypt, Rumania, Uganda, UK, France, Germany, Turkey,
etc, etc, one would have to call his 4- paragraph description of coffee
preparation in Italy (which indicated that coffee was prepared there "in the
French fashion") a rather glaring omission. Espresso was certainly "on the
radar" in Italy in 1935. That's why I said that exahustive a study as the
book *appears* to be, it was more than odd that expresso was not mentioned.
I will say, however, that in spite of his having inexplicably given espresso
very short shrift, the rest of the book is amazingly detailed especially in
the areas of the botany and chemistry of coffee, as well as its cultivation.
Definitely bookked . .




      
Date: 08 Oct 2006 08:57:25
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
It's true he has very little to say about Italy - maybe 1/2 of 1 column vs 5
pages on France . What you have to understand is that in those days he would
not have been expected to personally visit each country - "research" would
have consisted of going to a library and reading up on the subject - maybe
his Italian sources were thin. Of course the Italians would have said that
the French cafes were in "the Italian fashion" rather than vice versa.

Believe it or not, when he says "rapid filtering machines" he really is
referring to (the old style low pressure) espresso machines, so he does
mention it (though considering the detail he devotes to . "Espresso" was not
yet an English word so if he had used it most readers would not have known
what he was talking about. He mentions (even pictures) those "rapid
filtering machines in his chapter on "Apparatus" (p.618), mentioning
Bezzera, Pavoni, Victoria Arduino, etc. He could have explained a little
better (given the space he devotes to other subjects) how it is that these
machines produce "1,440 cups per hour" (24 cups a minute) given the level
of colorful detail he devotes to obscure methods of preparation in the
France section. I'll admit that the work is uneven.

What this shows you though is that the current dominance of Italy on the
worldwide commercial coffee scene (both in terms of export of roasted coffee
and machines) , which we take for granted was by no means a sure thing.
Predicting the future is very hard. It would have been as hard to predict
for Ukers as it would have been 30 years ago to predict that Australia would
outstrip France as a source of wine or that Korea would be opening car
factories in America and not vice versa.



"Alan" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:jq0Wg.12155$6S3.11072@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
>
>
> Well yes, but considering that the author did not limit himself to the US,
> and wrote over 100 pages of minutely detailed descriptions of preparation
> of coffee in Algeria, Egypt, Rumania, Uganda, UK, France, Germany, Turkey,
> etc, etc, one would have to call his 4- paragraph description of coffee
> preparation in Italy (which indicated that coffee was prepared there "in
> the French fashion") a rather glaring omission. Espresso was certainly
> "on the radar" in Italy in 1935. That's why I said that exahustive a study
> as the book *appears* to be, it was more than odd that expresso was not
> mentioned.
> I will say, however, that in spite of his having inexplicably given
> espresso very short shrift, the rest of the book is amazingly detailed
> especially in the areas of the botany and chemistry of coffee, as well as
> its cultivation.
> Definitely bookked . .
>




      
Date: 07 Oct 2006 23:10:47
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books

"Alan" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:jq0Wg.12155$6S3.11072@newssvr25.news.prodigy.net...
<snip/ >
> Definitely bookked . .
>
>
if you back up a level you can download it with a right-click




   
Date: 07 Oct 2006 19:28:05
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
YEs, I downloaded it a long time ago when someone posted it on the
Coffeegeek forums.
Craig.

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:aaydnfeIaehui7XYnZ2dnUVZ_rCdnZ2d@comcast.com...
> Someone else posted it a long time ago -
>
> it's the 1935 edition and it's 70 megs :
>
> http://www.coffeewisdom.com/all_about_coffee/all_about_coffee.pdf
>
> Google is supposed to let you have the full text of anything out of
> copyright and the Ukers they have is from 1922, which is old enough to
> be in the public domain - anything before 1923 is public domain at
> this point. When Congress passed the "Disney Company Protection Act of
> 1998", anthing older than 75 years at that point had already passed
> into the public domain and Congress did not revive the copyright
> (legally questionable if they could have even if they wanted to).
> Luckily Steamboat Willie (and thus the character of Mickey Mouse) was
> released in 1928 and now is protected (in the US) for a full century
> until 2028 (at which time Congress might decide to extend the
> copyright laws some more). The Constitution says that copyrights are
> for a "limited time" but leaves it up to Congress to say what that is
> and so far the courts have refused to intervene. Someone once asked
> Jack Valenti, the head of the MPAA how long he thought a "limited
> time" should be and he replied to effect that one day before the end
> of the world would be suitable.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> "Craig Andrews" <alt.coffee@deletethis.rogers.com> wrote in message
> news:4onc11Ff8tr3U1@individual.net...
>>
>> <mandtprice@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:1160149041.084138.21750@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>>>I haven't dropped by Google Books since it first 'opened' so I
>>>thought
>>> I'd poke around and see if they had anymore content than last time.
>>> I
>>> typed in coffee with the "Full view books" radio button selected and
>>> was surprised to see the oft mentioned Ukers text appear. I haven't
>>> been able to get my hands on a hardcopy of this despite keeping my
>>> eyes
>>> open for it whenever I'm in a library as it comes very recommended.
>>>
>>> You can only use Google's viewer in a browser window with this one.
>>> Most of the full view books can be downloaded as PDF, but for some
>>> reason it doesn't give that option for this one.
>>>
>>> http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC01724889&id=Y5tXt7aoLNoC&printsec=titlepage&as_brr=1
>>> or
>>> http://tinyurl.com/oc
>>>
>>> Matthew
>>>
>>
>> I haven't looked today, but I bought mine from the SCAA bookstore.,
>> become a member & save more. {:-)
>> Craig.
>
>



   
Date: 07 Oct 2006 16:31:18
From: notbob
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
On 2006-10-07, Jack Denver <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote:

> copyrights are for a "limited time" but leaves it up to Congress to say what
> that is and so far the courts have refused to intervene. Someone once asked
> Jack Valenti, the head of the MPAA how long he thought a "limited time"
> should be and he replied to effect that one day before the end of the world
> would be suitable.

As I understand it, the original copyright laws were for a period of
15 yrs from origination. The last I heard, it was for 75 yrs after
the originator dies. The real goal is to get copyrighted material
changed to an use license, the idea being no end to corporate
ownership, ever. You're just renting. This is going to become
insufferable when technology advances require the use of these
"license" applications to survive in a new high tech environment
(online banking, taxes, etc).

Quite frankly, I'm starting to get fed up with the whole trend.
Despite being a lifelong technofreak, I'm starting to see how I might
finally just pack it in and become an r-word luddite.

nb



    
Date: 07 Oct 2006 17:58:24
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books
The basic term is now the life of the author plus 70 years, so for example
if Sir Paul remains in good shape, some of the early Beatles songs may
remain under copyright for 120 years or more. George and Ira Gershwin songs
from the '20s will remain copyrighted until 2053, 70 years after Ira's death
and again almost 130 years after they were written.

Since corporations have indefinite life, another system is used for
corporately created works. A work made "for hire" has copyright protection
for the term of 95 years from the date of "publication", or 120 years from
the date of creation, whichever term lapses first. So Disney can sell DVD's
of this year's cartoon hits until 2101 (that is if Congress doesn't decide
to lenghten the period further). It seems to me that Congress has fairly
balanced the interests of the public and copyright owners (taking into
account the relative amounts of campaign contributions the average citizen
gives vs. the amount contributed by Disney).


www.dml.indiana.edu/pdf/dml-copyright-duration-report.pdf



The shame of it is that the framers could have shortcut this all if they had
just said "20 years" or somesuch - they would have been shocked to hear that
130 years is a "limited time". I haven't looked at the Federalist Papers or
anything, but if I had to guess, some of the framers probably thought "10
years" and others thought "20" and since they couldn't agree they left it at
"limited time" and moved on. Big mistake.

Note that in the case of patents, which do not have as rich a lobby behind
them (except for the drug industry where there have been a number of legal
shenanigans) the duration (though slightly increased over the years) still
remains at 20 years.





"notbob" <notbob@nothome.com > wrote in message
news:htWdnVJGZJI7gbXYnZ2dnUVZ_tGdnZ2d@comcast.com...
> On 2006-10-07, Jack Denver <nunuvyer@netscape.net> wrote:
>
>> copyrights are for a "limited time" but leaves it up to Congress to say
>> what
>> that is and so far the courts have refused to intervene. Someone once
>> asked
>> Jack Valenti, the head of the MPAA how long he thought a "limited time"
>> should be and he replied to effect that one day before the end of the
>> world
>> would be suitable.
>
> As I understand it, the original copyright laws were for a period of
> 15 yrs from origination. The last I heard, it was for 75 yrs after
> the originator dies. The real goal is to get copyrighted material
> changed to an use license, the idea being no end to corporate
> ownership, ever. You're just renting. This is going to become
> insufferable when technology advances require the use of these
> "license" applications to survive in a new high tech environment
> (online banking, taxes, etc).
>
> Quite frankly, I'm starting to get fed up with the whole trend.
> Despite being a lifelong technofreak, I'm starting to see how I might
> finally just pack it in and become an r-word luddite.
>
> nb
>




  
Date: 06 Oct 2006 11:49:12
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: All About Coffee by Ukers on Google Books

"Craig Andrews" <alt.coffee@deletethis.rogers.com > wrote in message
news:4onc11Ff8tr3U1@individual.net...
>
> <mandtprice@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1160149041.084138.21750@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
>>I haven't dropped by Google Books since it first 'opened' so I thought
>> I'd poke around and see if they had anymore content than last time.
>> I
>> typed in coffee with the "Full view books" radio button selected and
>> was surprised to see the oft mentioned Ukers text appear. I haven't
>> been able to get my hands on a hardcopy of this despite keeping my
>> eyes
>> open for it whenever I'm in a library as it comes very recommended.
>>
>> You can only use Google's viewer in a browser window with this one.
>> Most of the full view books can be downloaded as PDF, but for some
>> reason it doesn't give that option for this one.
>>
>> http://books.google.com/books?vid=OCLC01724889&id=Y5tXt7aoLNoC&printsec=titlepage&as_brr=1
>> or
>> http://tinyurl.com/oc
>>
>> Matthew
>>
>
> I haven't looked today, but I bought mine from the SCAA bookstore.,
> become a member & save more. {:-)
> Craig.

$110 non-member Retail price, $85 member price.
http://scaa.org/shop/products_catalog.asp
Craig.