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Date: 15 May 2007 13:30:03
From: bernie
Subject: And then a pastry question
The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school
and did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured
out the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
Bernie (this is the fun part today)




 
Date: 16 May 2007 14:44:11
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On May 15, 3:30 pm, bernie <bdig...@zianet.com > wrote:
> The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
> Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
> and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
> makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
> travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
> sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
> asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
> our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
> comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
> small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
> I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
> know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school
> and did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured
> out the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
> Bernie (this is the fun part today)

Greek or Turkish pastry. Haven't stayed in Greece more than a couple
weeks, but believe they're about the same.



 
Date: 16 May 2007 11:32:34
From: AQ
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On May 15, 3:30 pm, bernie <bdig...@zianet.com > wrote:
> The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
> Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
> and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
> makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
> travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
> sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
> asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
> our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
> comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
> small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
> I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
> know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school
> and did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured
> out the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
> Bernie (this is the fun part today)


People can't resist a good brownie!



  
Date: 16 May 2007 20:31:15
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On 16 May 2007 11:32:34 -0700, AQ <quesada.arturo@gmail.com > wrote:

>People can't resist a good brownie!

So true!

Marshall


 
Date: 16 May 2007 12:12:07
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
I love pastry. I dream about donuts and cinnamon rolls the nights before we
take our two weekly trips to the Daylite Donut shop. I prefer glazed donuts
[not cake] or twists, never sugar coated. I also love their cream cheese
rolls and chocolate nut rolls. Blueberry scones are good, and cranberry-nut
muffins. Pound cake always seemed made for hot tea. I've never tasted a
crumpet. Apricot turnovers are also great. Apricot, prune, or poppy seed
kolaches are delicious. As you can see, I am not hard to please as long as
it is fresh.

"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:464a0a3b$1@nntp.zianet.com...
> We currently have extra-large muffins, small bear-claws, doughnuts,
> croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?




 
Date: 16 May 2007 10:00:59
From: AG
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
Hi Bernie,

I'd consider adding savory type pastries. You do not need a talented
baker to produce inexpensive yet attractive pastries based on puff pastry
dough (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puff_pastry). The dough is available
(frozen) in 5"x5" squares and takes 30-40 minures from freezer to eating.
See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourekas as examples of things
popular in some parts of eastern Europe and the ME.

AG


In article <464a0a3b$1@nntp.zianet.com >, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote:

> The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
> Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
> and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
> makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
> travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
> sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
> asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
> our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
> comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
> small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
> I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
> know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school
> and did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured
> out the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
> Bernie (this is the fun part today)


  
Date: 16 May 2007 12:09:18
From: bernie
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
AG wrote:
> Hi Bernie,
>
> I'd consider adding savory type pastries. You do not need a talented
> baker to produce inexpensive yet attractive pastries based on puff pastry
> dough (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puff_pastry). The dough is available
> (frozen) in 5"x5" squares and takes 30-40 minures from freezer to eating.
> See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourekas as examples of things
> popular in some parts of eastern Europe and the ME.
>
> AG
>
>
> In article <464a0a3b$1@nntp.zianet.com>, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote:
>
>
>>The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
>>Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
>>and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
>>makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
>>travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
>>sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
>>asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
>>our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
>>comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
>>small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
>>What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
>>I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
>>know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school
>>and did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured
>>out the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
>>Bernie (this is the fun part today)

I met with the woman who will be doing the baking this morning and
she brought in samples of the "scratch" pastries she does. Very good to
me. She also suggested that some of the items not presented but which
I'm interested in having would do well to be made with the puff pastry.
Now I'm hungry.
Bernie


   
Date: 17 May 2007 09:06:01
From: AG
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
In article <464b48cd@nntp.zianet.com >, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote:


> I met with the woman who will be doing the baking this morning and
> she brought in samples of the "scratch" pastries she does. Very good to
> me. She also suggested that some of the items not presented but which
> I'm interested in having would do well to be made with the puff pastry.
> Now I'm hungry.

Bernie,

I hope I will not spoil this for you but the label on the box of 5x5 puff
pastry squares says that each one is 250 calories sans filling.

AG


   
Date: 16 May 2007 20:34:16
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Wed, 16 May 2007 12:09:18 -0600, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote:

>Now I'm hungry.


ah, the perils of bakery product development!


:)


--barry "watch out for the ongoing QC, too!"


    
Date: 16 May 2007 14:09:54
From:
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Wed, 16 May 2007 20:34:16 GMT, Barry Jarrett
<barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:

>On Wed, 16 May 2007 12:09:18 -0600, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote:
>
> >Now I'm hungry.
>
>
>ah, the perils of bakery product development!
>
>
>:)
>
>
>--barry "watch out for the ongoing QC, too!"

This thread has me drooling. I keep thinking I'll have a suggestion
for Bernie, but I get caught up imagining tastes and lose my mind. I
live far from a bakery and remember the Paris and Florence pastries
and just day dream and wish for lunch. hahaha Thanks Bernie. I bet
bakery development is a great job:).

If you want a taste tester, Bernie, I volunteer.

aloha,
Cea
roast beans to kona to email
farmers of Pure Kona


  
Date: 16 May 2007 18:02:59
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Wed, 16 May 2007 10:00:59 -0700, dot@dot.dot (AG) wrote:

>Hi Bernie,
>
>I'd consider adding savory type pastries. You do not need a talented
>baker to produce inexpensive yet attractive pastries based on puff pastry
>dough (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Puff_pastry). The dough is available
>(frozen) in 5"x5" squares and takes 30-40 minures from freezer to eating.
>See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bourekas as examples of things
>popular in some parts of eastern Europe and the ME.
>
>AG

I'm going to go out on a limb here, but I doubt the bureks 'n' latte
craze has hit New Mexico yet.

Also the local health department might not be cool with storing meat
in an unrefrigerated pastry case. :-)

Marshall "cappas 'n' empanadas a possibility"


   
Date: 17 May 2007 09:03:26
From: AG
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
In article <jjhm43dsodqrnfe0qj9qn61b3f7g4vfrdr@4ax.com >, Marshall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:


> I'm going to go out on a limb here, but I doubt the bureks 'n' latte
> craze has hit New Mexico yet.
>
> Also the local health department might not be cool with storing meat
> in an unrefrigerated pastry case. :-)
>

Marshall,

I'm not sure where you got the idea of meat. The most common filling is
cheese based and I do not recall any health department objecting to
storage of cheese danish in unrefrigerated cases. The main difference
between these and the classic turnover is that they are salty, not sweet.

AG


    
Date: 17 May 2007 17:52:29
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Thu, 17 May 2007 09:03:26 -0700, dot@dot.dot (AG) wrote:

>In article <jjhm43dsodqrnfe0qj9qn61b3f7g4vfrdr@4ax.com>, Marshall
><mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net> wrote:
>
>
>> I'm going to go out on a limb here, but I doubt the bureks 'n' latte
>> craze has hit New Mexico yet.
>>
>> Also the local health department might not be cool with storing meat
>> in an unrefrigerated pastry case. :-)
>>
>
>Marshall,
>
>I'm not sure where you got the idea of meat. The most common filling is
>cheese based and I do not recall any health department objecting to
>storage of cheese danish in unrefrigerated cases. The main difference
>between these and the classic turnover is that they are salty, not sweet.
>
>AG

I used to get meat bureks all the time at a long-gone "Yugoslavian"
restaurant in the Fairfax districts. So, I normally associate savory
pastries with meat pies. But, you are right, they could be cheese.

Marshall


   
Date: 17 May 2007 01:19:56
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question


 
Date: 16 May 2007 11:13:13
From: Steve Ackman
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
In <464a0a3b$1@nntp.zianet.com >, on Tue, 15 May 2007 13:30:03 -0600,
bernie wrote:

> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
> I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
> know pastry.

I rarely eat anything with coffee, but when I do, it
needs to be something not sickly sweet, so scones if
anything at all.



 
Date: 15 May 2007 16:44:26
From: Ross Wentworth
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
+1 for chocolate biscotti

I agree with the pound cake suggestion, though my preference is lemon.

Here's an idea that may be stupid. See if she (the pastry chef) would
be interested in doing something unusual from another country each week.
Some kind of regional thing. This could set you apart from all the
other "coffee shops serving donuts" (no insult intended). Let me know
when it's Hungarian Sour Cherry Cake week. :)

I agree about scones. Rock hard biscuits do not appeal to me.

bernie wrote:
> The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
> Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
> and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
> makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
> travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
> sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
> asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
> our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
> comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
> small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
> I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
> know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school
> and did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured
> out the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
> Bernie (this is the fun part today)


  
Date: 10 Jun 2007 16:14:38
From: Joe Loewenstein
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
Me, I like a nice rye roll with raisins and walnuts. Those of us obliged to
watch our cholesterol like to find something moist and sweet that's not full
of butterfat.

That said, one of the joys of a trip to Seattle is doughnuts at Top Pot, where
the espresso is top-tier. Not sure if this would appeal to a proper
pastry-chef -- not sure that the raisin rolls would either.

Also, proper German fruit kuchens (muerbeteig): rhubarb, various stone fruits.
Again, not so low-fat, but lower than the usual bakery muffin. (And these
can also be done with an oil-based dough: not as lovely as with butter, but
can be advertised as low-fat.)

One other things. I know of a baker who used to operate in Athens, OH, who
did a fantastic turn on a chocolate croissant. He'd put a ribbon of very good
chocolate into regular pointy-ended yeast rolls (maybe done with sourdough or
a biga). Amazingly good when warm: the chocolate sang a bit more when not
emerging from something as buttery as pate feuilletee. As with the rye rolls,
it all depends on whether your baker has an enthusiasm for yeast.






  
Date: 19 May 2007 17:47:47
From: L Littlehale
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
I realize its not the purest of traditional pastries, but there is =
something special about croissants with bakery cheese and strawberry =
filling. Raspberry and chocolate are acceptable substitutes ;).
Danish are good with the same fillings, even though they don't have the =
crunch of the puff paste.

"Ross Wentworth" <rossz@sonic.net > wrote in message =
news:464a45fb$0$14078$742ec2ed@news.sonic.net...


 
Date: 15 May 2007 15:00:25
From: Cordovero
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?

1. Truly fresh croissant.
2. Cinnamon something that's not too sweet (no icing!). A cinammon twist,
e.g.
3. If nothing else, some basic pound cake: either chocolate or standard.
4. Homemade chocolate biscotti.

Cordo




  
Date: 16 May 2007 01:22:54
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Tue, 15 May 2007 15:00:25 -0700, "Cordovero"
<cordoveroremovexxx@yahooxxx.com > wrote:

>> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
>
>1. Truly fresh croissant.

I'll even go with a slightly stale croissant, as long as its a REAL
croissant. Flaky and buttery with crunch. If you can slice it into a
sandwich, it ain't a croissant.

Marshall


   
Date: 19 May 2007 17:31:58
From: L Littlehale
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
The appeal of scones is the way they compliment warm beverages. They are =
lower fat than other pastry and not as sweet. This makes them seem more =
of a meal than a snack. Lower fat content and baking soda levening make =
them easier to digest as well.



"Marshall" <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote in message =
news:k3nk43lsljm473a3kpg5jh0pulr2e9feq4@4ax.com...


    
Date: 20 May 2007 20:27:03
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Sat, 19 May 2007 17:31:58 -0400, "L Littlehale"
<llittlehale@carolina.rr.com > wrote:

>The appeal of scones is the way they compliment warm beverages. They are lower fat than other pastry and not as sweet. This makes them seem more of a meal than a snack. Lower fat content and baking soda levening make them easier to digest as well.
>
>


and the clotted cream & strawberry jam help, too!



    
Date: 20 May 2007 01:54:56
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Sat, 19 May 2007 17:31:58 -0400, "L Littlehale"
<llittlehale@carolina.rr.com > wrote:

>The appeal of scones is the way they compliment warm beverages. They are lower fat than other pastry and not as sweet. This makes them seem more of a meal than a snack. Lower fat content and baking soda levening make them easier to digest as well.

Depends how much clotted cream and jam you put on them!

Marshall


     
Date: 20 May 2007 20:27:52
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Sun, 20 May 2007 01:54:56 GMT, Marshall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

>On Sat, 19 May 2007 17:31:58 -0400, "L Littlehale"
><llittlehale@carolina.rr.com> wrote:
>
>>The appeal of scones is the way they compliment warm beverages. They are lower fat than other pastry and not as sweet. This makes them seem more of a meal than a snack. Lower fat content and baking soda levening make them easier to digest as well.
>
>Depends how much clotted cream and jam you put on them!

dammit! see what happens when i don't read all the replies before
responding?

;)


--barry "mmmm... clotted cream..."



   
Date: 16 May 2007 02:38:47
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Wed, 16 May 2007 01:22:54 GMT, Marshall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

>On Tue, 15 May 2007 15:00:25 -0700, "Cordovero"
><cordoveroremovexxx@yahooxxx.com> wrote:
>
>>> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
>>
>>1. Truly fresh croissant.
>
>I'll even go with a slightly stale croissant, as long as its a REAL
>croissant. Flaky and buttery with crunch. If you can slice it into a
>sandwich, it ain't a croissant.
>

mmmmmmmmmmm.... croissant & espresso.

:)




    
Date: 15 May 2007 22:31:03
From: Cordovero
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
You know, it's interesting. When I grew up in Philly and its suburbs, my
mom would sometimes take me out for coffee and pastry. In those days, the
coffee was pretty bad (compared to what we make on this group) but it wasn't
hard to find a fresh brioche (a real one, almost no sweetness, mostly
butter) or good croissant. Nowadays there are cafes everywhere, and the
coffee is up and down, but I've found most have horrendously bad pastries
[heck, even the biscotti are bad]. I have found that whenever I stray from
a slice of pound cake, I'm usually very sorry I did.

C

"Barry Jarrett" <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote in message
news:cmrk431om28bfd34mfgbm5bbnh5laf1t30@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 16 May 2007 01:22:54 GMT, Marshall
> <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net> wrote:
>
> >On Tue, 15 May 2007 15:00:25 -0700, "Cordovero"
> ><cordoveroremovexxx@yahooxxx.com> wrote:
> >
> >>> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your
> >>> coffee?
> >>
> >>1. Truly fresh croissant.
> >
> >I'll even go with a slightly stale croissant, as long as its a REAL
> >croissant. Flaky and buttery with crunch. If you can slice it into a
> >sandwich, it ain't a croissant.
> >
>
> mmmmmmmmmmm.... croissant & espresso.
>
> :)
>
>




     
Date: 16 May 2007 19:47:53
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
On Tue, 15 May 2007 22:31:03 -0700, "Cordovero"
<cordoveroremovexxx@yahooxxx.com > wrote:

>You know, it's interesting. When I grew up in Philly and its suburbs, my
>mom would sometimes take me out for coffee and pastry. In those days, the
>coffee was pretty bad (compared to what we make on this group) but it wasn't
>hard to find a fresh brioche (a real one, almost no sweetness, mostly
>butter) or good croissant. Nowadays there are cafes everywhere, and the
>coffee is up and down, but I've found most have horrendously bad pastries
>[heck, even the biscotti are bad]. I have found that whenever I stray from
>a slice of pound cake, I'm usually very sorry I did.

I got started on the espresso & croissant during a trip to France,
where we'd pop into a cafe in Bayeux each morning.

We've got a Breadsmith down the street from our house, and we stop in
every week to get bread to make paninis at the store, and I pick up a
croissant or two. They're not the greatest I've ever had, but
certainly decent enough to enjoy with espresso.

A couple of years ago, we tried to go with frozen croissants, but
could never work out a satisfactory thaw regimen.... Forget about
asking June to make them fresh, I might as well ask her to grow coffee
trees out back!



   
Date: 15 May 2007 19:25:18
From: Cordovero
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
I once went to one of the "Jitters" (small cafe chain, a few stores) in
Vegas, and I could see the person in the back taking a croissant out of a
frozen Sara Lee's box, and sticking it in the microwave, after I ordered a
croissant to go with my (undrinkable) cappa.

C

"Marshall" <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote in message
news:k3nk43lsljm473a3kpg5jh0pulr2e9feq4@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 15 May 2007 15:00:25 -0700, "Cordovero"
> <cordoveroremovexxx@yahooxxx.com> wrote:
>
>>> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
>>
>>1. Truly fresh croissant.
>
> I'll even go with a slightly stale croissant, as long as its a REAL
> croissant. Flaky and buttery with crunch. If you can slice it into a
> sandwich, it ain't a croissant.
>
> Marshall




 
Date: 15 May 2007 17:26:31
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: And then a pastry question
Biscotti - gotta have biscotti w/ coffee.



"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:464a0a3b$1@nntp.zianet.com...
> The new space we have leased is coming together for a bakery commissary.
> Currently we use an in-town bakery that has changed hands several times
> and is getting ready to change again. So we think having our own bakery
> makes sense since we found a baker who has an existing bakery but is
> travelling 80 miles one-way to access her family's equipment. She will
> sub-contract the space for her needs and we will buy from her. She is
> asking what we would like to have on a daily basis. I believe currently
> our supplier is doing a large batch and freezing since his baker only
> comes in once or twice a week. We currently have extra-large muffins,
> small bear-claws, doughnuts, croissants and they do our focaccia bread.
> What sort of pastry and baked goods do you like to buy with your coffee?
> I'm not a big pastry eater so I'm looking around for folks who really do
> know pastry. By the way, the baker is a graduate of a culinary school and
> did the two-year pastry chef program also. I've never quite figured out
> the attraction of scones, but they seem to be high on the list.
> Bernie (this is the fun part today)
>