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Date: 06 Nov 2006 01:50:43
From: Edwin Hurwitz
Subject: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
I have a Silvia that is about 5 or 6 years old and it's need of an
overhaul. Pressure is no longer what it used to be and it leaks while
warming up. I live in Colorado and would like to get it overhauled
locally, but if there is a place that is really worth the shipping, I
would go that route.

Are there updates that can be performed while overhauling?

TIA
Edwin




 
Date: 06 Nov 2006 09:18:56
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
A complete overhaul runs about $80 to $150 -- parts AND labor
included.

NOT everyone has the time, tools or interest to do it themselves.

Dave
877 286 2833

151.5



 
Date: 06 Nov 2006 08:16:19
From: Omniryx@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
I'm sure that dave does good work but, unless you are completely
without mechanical aptitude, there is no reason to pay someone else to
do this simple job for you. In less time than it will take you to box
up Miss Silvie, ship her off to Unca Dave, unpack her after Unca Dave
ships her back, and set her up again, you can do the work yourself.


daveb wrote:
> Yes, there is. Send it to me.
> I work on about 5 silvias a week.
> Installing 'pid' controllers on new and old silvias alike, If there
> are problems a firm quote is given before any repairs. All parts are
> stocked. I am also factory authorized by Saeco USA and Gaggia. Many
> references available.
>
> Call anytime 877 286 2833
> Dave
> www.hitechespresso.com



 
Date: 06 Nov 2006 16:13:56
From: Geoff Gatell
Subject: Re: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
Edwin

Although this might not be of much use to you in Colorado you might be able
to get some useful info from espressotec Vancouver,BCon the web. They sell
and service many makes of machines and are very good.

Geoff

"Edwin Hurwitz" <edwin@indra.com > wrote in message
news:edwin-0A99A7.01504306112006@news.indra.com...
>I have a Silvia that is about 5 or 6 years old and it's need of an
> overhaul. Pressure is no longer what it used to be and it leaks while
> warming up. I live in Colorado and would like to get it overhauled
> locally, but if there is a place that is really worth the shipping, I
> would go that route.
>
> Are there updates that can be performed while overhauling?
>
> TIA
> Edwin




 
Date: 06 Nov 2006 07:16:37
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
Edwin Hurwitz <edwin@indra.com > wrote:

>I have a Silvia that is about 5 or 6 years old and it's need of an
>overhaul. Pressure is no longer what it used to be and it leaks while
>warming up. I live in Colorado and would like to get it overhauled
>locally, but if there is a place that is really worth the shipping, I
>would go that route.
>
Are you handy with tools at all? Do you know someone who is? Even a
complete disassembly is not all that difficult if you have or can use
(from memory):
-open end wrenches
-flare nut wrenches
-hex wrenches
(all metric)
-adjustable open end wrench is also helpful
-screwdrivers
-needle nose pliers
-steel wool or scotchbright pad

With those tools you can rebuild the steam/hot water valve (which is
probably where the leak is from, but you weren't specific),replace the
brewhead gasket, and remove and clean the 3-way valve.

an afternoon of labor and about $30 in parts can do it. If you can't,
find a friend who has done some automotive work like rebuilding a
carburetor (remember those?) or similar. it really isn't difficult for
the handy folk. I think the hardest job (and one that doesn't have to
be done) is removing the switches from the front panel because their
retention tabs are quite stiff.

As for updates, I don't think so with the machine of your age, with
the exception of adding PID temp control if you were so inclined.
Machines that are over about 6.5 years old could use a new boiler if
they still have the old, bolted-in heating element, but most of these
have long ago leaked and needed replacing..


With the shipping and labor cost saved by a DIY project you could pay
for a PID kit!


>Are there updates that can be performed while overhauling?
>

Randy "" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com




  
Date: 06 Nov 2006 08:55:22
From: Edwin Hurwitz
Subject: Re: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
Thanks Randy! I have actually worked on it myself. Shortly after I got
it, I replaced the boiler as it had the problem you described below.
I've also replaced the steam wand and disassembled and cleaned the 3-way
valve. I suppose that I all really need, then, are the O rings and
gaskets. However, I am not sure I want to spend the time, as I am a self
employed musician and have a lot of work backed up already. An afternoon
rebuilding my Silvia sounds like a lot of fun, but it also sounds like
an excellent opportunity for procrastination!

I'm not that interested in a PID, except for the geek factor, as I am
quite happy with my coffee.

Edwin

In article <pmjuk2lffnftc5qdv95suqtu17fjj1jkea@4ax.com >,
Randy G. <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com > wrote:

> Edwin Hurwitz <edwin@indra.com> wrote:
>
> >I have a Silvia that is about 5 or 6 years old and it's need of an
> >overhaul. Pressure is no longer what it used to be and it leaks while
> >warming up. I live in Colorado and would like to get it overhauled
> >locally, but if there is a place that is really worth the shipping, I
> >would go that route.
> >
> Are you handy with tools at all? Do you know someone who is? Even a
> complete disassembly is not all that difficult if you have or can use
> (from memory):
> -open end wrenches
> -flare nut wrenches
> -hex wrenches
> (all metric)
> -adjustable open end wrench is also helpful
> -screwdrivers
> -needle nose pliers
> -steel wool or scotchbright pad
>
> With those tools you can rebuild the steam/hot water valve (which is
> probably where the leak is from, but you weren't specific),replace the
> brewhead gasket, and remove and clean the 3-way valve.
>
> an afternoon of labor and about $30 in parts can do it. If you can't,
> find a friend who has done some automotive work like rebuilding a
> carburetor (remember those?) or similar. it really isn't difficult for
> the handy folk. I think the hardest job (and one that doesn't have to
> be done) is removing the switches from the front panel because their
> retention tabs are quite stiff.
>
> As for updates, I don't think so with the machine of your age, with
> the exception of adding PID temp control if you were so inclined.
> Machines that are over about 6.5 years old could use a new boiler if
> they still have the old, bolted-in heating element, but most of these
> have long ago leaked and needed replacing..
>
>
> With the shipping and labor cost saved by a DIY project you could pay
> for a PID kit!
>
>
> >Are there updates that can be performed while overhauling?
> >
>
> Randy "" G.
> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>
>


 
Date: 06 Nov 2006 04:56:59
From: daveb
Subject: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
Yes, there is. Send it to me.
I work on about 5 silvias a week.
Installing 'pid' controllers on new and old silvias alike, If there
are problems a firm quote is given before any repairs. All parts are
stocked. I am also factory authorized by Saeco USA and Gaggia. Many
references available.

Call anytime 877 286 2833
Dave
www.hitechespresso.com



Edwin Hurwitz wrote:
> I have a Silvia that is about 5 or 6 years old and it's need of an
> overhaul. Pressure is no longer what it used to be and it leaks while
> warming up. I live in Colorado and would like to get it overhauled
> locally, but if there is a place that is really worth the shipping, I
> would go that route.
>
> Are there updates that can be performed while overhauling?
>
> TIA
> Edwin



 
Date: 06 Nov 2006 09:28:56
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: Best place for Silvia overhaul?
There's really not all that much to do; it's the labour that's the killer.
Replacing ALL the rubber involves 1 x boiler o-ring, 1 x group gasket, 1 x
steam washer, 3 x steam o-rings, 2 x solenoid o-rings. About 20 minutes and
$30.00 parts total. Cleaning up the accumulated scale & coffee crud BEFORE
you replace the rubber can take a couple of hours.


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au