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Date: 05 Jan 2007 22:38:42
From: mattw
Subject: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
I have sold my Expobar Pulser (and am probably going to get a small
commercial machine and/or a lever machine to replace it) and need to
ship it from GA to TX. Just wondering what people think would be the
best way to package it. My thought was one box with foam, then wrap
that box in bubble wrap and put it in a second box.

Any other input from successful cross-country trips?

/mw





 
Date: 08 Jan 2007 12:56:44
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
"mattw" <matthewgwells@gmail.com > wrote in news:1168065522.863457.33480
@i15g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

> I have sold my Expobar Pulser (and am probably going to get a small
> commercial machine and/or a lever machine to replace it) and need to
> ship it from GA to TX. Just wondering what people think would be the
> best way to package it. My thought was one box with foam, then wrap
> that box in bubble wrap and put it in a second box.
>
> Any other input from successful cross-country trips?
>
> /mw
>
>
Howdy Matt!

I've used Navis to pack commercial machines for shipping. Their 'foam in
place' service is terrific. http://www.gonavis.com/

Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
--
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r
Remove "Z" to reply via email.


 
Date: 06 Jan 2007 09:13:07
From: Felix
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
mattw writes:
> My thought was one box with foam, then wrap that
> box in bubble wrap and put it in a second box.
>
> Any other input from successful cross-country trips?

It depends on what you mean by "foam," but it sounds promising. My most
challenging shipment was a pair of Krohn-Hite amplifiers from MA to CA
for subsequent surface shipment to NZ. There were three boxes, two for
the amplifiers and one for the rack mounts and vacuum tubes. All three
were wrapped as you described so they fit snugly in their outer boxes.
Between buying the material, trimming and filling boxes, wrapping ...
it took me about a day to pack that shipment.

I think each amplifier weighed more than your Pulser, and your shipment
isn't going as far. The outer layer of padding can be styrofoam peanuts
if you pack them down the sides, overfill slightly, and let the package
rest two days (one day upside-down) so they'll settle and compress.
This is a good application for this material, because there's no danger
of load shifting.

Lots of ways to skin this cat ... the bottom padding can be crumpled
newspaper, another underrated packing material. To make the newspaper
easier to handle, you can pack it into tubular paper/plastic bags.

Of course, the padding inside the inner box is just as important, if
not more so. The bagging trick might also work in here, though this
time the filler is styrofoam peanuts and the goal is to prevent load
shifting. Scraps of bubble wrap, an old sweater ... whatever it takes
to turn that box into a somewhat fragile, but well-formed solid that
just needs some padding to survive rolling down a flight of stairs.

Custom molded foam and bubble wrap would earn you style points, but try
converting them to cash ...


Felix



  
Date: 06 Jan 2007 20:04:32
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
On 6 Jan 2007 09:13:07 -0800, "Felix" <felixyen@hotmail.com > wrote:

>... and bubble wrap would earn you style points, but try
>converting them to cash ...


you'd definitely get maddie-points, though.

when she unwrapped her first xmas gift this year, she didn't make it
past the bubble wrap. "POPPING BUBBLES! POPPING BUBBLES! OH, THANK
YOU MOM-MOM! I LOVE POPPING BUBBLES!"


--barry "yeah, about that loud, too"



 
Date: 06 Jan 2007 05:33:23
From: stefano65
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping

Make sure you drain the boiler and the heating exchanger first,
the do as suggested above, the only thing i will add to it is to put
the machine in a bag (trash bag) so no loosen matter might go init or
out of it













mattw wrote:
> I have sold my Expobar Pulser (and am probably going to get a small
> commercial machine and/or a lever machine to replace it) and need to
> ship it from GA to TX. Just wondering what people think would be the
> best way to package it. My thought was one box with foam, then wrap
> that box in bubble wrap and put it in a second box.
>
> Any other input from successful cross-country trips?
>
> /mw



  
Date: 06 Jan 2007 10:47:42
From: Ken Fox
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
"stefano65" <espressocare@msn.com > wrote in message
news:1168090403.473285.171380@s80g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> Make sure you drain the boiler and the heating exchanger first,

this is really essential, especially at this time of year. If the machine
has freeze damage, it will quickly become no more than a heavyweight
doorstop. If you don't know how to drain almost all the water out of the
machine, make sure you find out how and do it before you package it up.
There is presumably a drain plug at or near the bottom of the boiler. As
for the heat exchanger, I'm not exactly sure how you would drain that on an
e-61, but I'm sure there are a lot of people here who could tell you how.

ken




   
Date: 07 Jan 2007 23:58:18
From: Cordo
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
Kristi over at coffeegeek has a number of posts on putting antifreeze in
machines mailed during winter time.

C

"Ken Fox" <morceaudemerde@snipThisPleaseHotmail.com > wrote in message
news:50a5lvF1fek87U1@mid.individual.net...
> "stefano65" <espressocare@msn.com> wrote in message
> news:1168090403.473285.171380@s80g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>
>> Make sure you drain the boiler and the heating exchanger first,
>
> this is really essential, especially at this time of year. If the machine
> has freeze damage, it will quickly become no more than a heavyweight
> doorstop. If you don't know how to drain almost all the water out of the
> machine, make sure you find out how and do it before you package it up.
> There is presumably a drain plug at or near the bottom of the boiler. As
> for the heat exchanger, I'm not exactly sure how you would drain that on
> an e-61, but I'm sure there are a lot of people here who could tell you
> how.
>
> ken
>
>




 
Date: 06 Jan 2007 01:26:55
From: Jasonian
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping

I- >Ian wrote:
> On 5 Jan 2007 22:38:42 -0800, "mattw" <matthewgwells@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >I have sold my Expobar Pulser (and am probably going to get a small
> >commercial machine and/or a lever machine to replace it) and need to
> >ship it from GA to TX. Just wondering what people think would be the
> >best way to package it. My thought was one box with foam, then wrap
> >that box in bubble wrap and put it in a second box.
> >
> >Any other input from successful cross-country trips?
> >
> >/mw
>
> The major shippers all have guidelines on line.
>
> Wrap the machine in two layers of 1" bubble wrap and place it in a
> double wall box. Addinng 3-4 inches of foam and an outer double wall
> box will pretty much guarantee safe arrival.
I sure hope so.



 
Date: 05 Jan 2007 22:49:47
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: Best way to package an Espresso Machine for shipping
On 5 Jan 2007 22:38:42 -0800, "mattw" <matthewgwells@gmail.com > wrote:

>I have sold my Expobar Pulser (and am probably going to get a small
>commercial machine and/or a lever machine to replace it) and need to
>ship it from GA to TX. Just wondering what people think would be the
>best way to package it. My thought was one box with foam, then wrap
>that box in bubble wrap and put it in a second box.
>
>Any other input from successful cross-country trips?
>
>/mw

The major shippers all have guidelines on line.

Wrap the machine in two layers of 1" bubble wrap and place it in a
double wall box. Addinng 3-4 inches of foam and an outer double wall
box will pretty much guarantee safe arrival.