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Date: 11 Apr 2007 06:40:40
From: shane
Subject: Black Gold on PBS
The documentary film "Black Gold" was broadcast on my local PBS
affiliate. I am not sure if it has gone USA wide or not. The film is
about the global coffee consumption and how coffee production affects
farmers in Ethiopia and the farmers trying to get a fair price for
their coffee.

Odd how it often happens that you hear something and than hear the
same thing again in a short time. Black Gold mentions Peace Coffee, a
roaster in Minneapolis. A new burrito restaraunt opened last week
near me, they have an espresso machine and buy their coffee from Peace
Coffee. The espresso machine looked interesting, I cannot recall what
the name was La-something. It was not a La Marzocco. It has E-61
groups and cool looking buttons that were lit up with a soft blue
glow. One of the employees was telling me about Peace Coffee,
evidently they deliver all of their coffee by bicycle. Cool idea,
bicycle delivery of Fair trade coffee, but is their coffee any
good?

I videotaped the movie and I will have to watch it again, as I
probably missed a few things.

Shane





 
Date: 12 Apr 2007 10:20:41
From: shane
Subject: Re: Black Gold on PBS
I just did a search, I think the machine in question is a Laranzato.
The pictures on the Laranzato web site look like what I remember.

Shane


On Apr 12, 9:11 am, "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com > wrote:
> On Apr 11, 7:21 pm, "Jasonian" <jason.hae...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > The espresso machine looked interesting, I cannot recall what> the name was La-something. It was not a La Marzocco. It has E-61
> > > groups and cool looking buttons that were lit up with a soft blue
> > > glow.
>
> > La San Marco? La Cimbali? La Pavoni?
>
> It was not La Cimbali or La Pavoni. The nameplate was all one word
> with a capital L. It was late at night, the lights were dimmed and it
> was behing a bar.
> The design of the exterior of the machine was stainless, with blue
> lights. I'll take a closer look next time I go.
>
> Shane




 
Date: 12 Apr 2007 07:11:37
From: shane
Subject: Re: Black Gold on PBS
On Apr 11, 7:21 pm, "Jasonian" <jason.hae...@gmail.com > wrote:
> The espresso machine looked interesting, I cannot recall what> the name was La-something. It was not a La Marzocco. It has E-61
> > groups and cool looking buttons that were lit up with a soft blue
> > glow.
>
> La San Marco? La Cimbali? La Pavoni?

It was not La Cimbali or La Pavoni. The nameplate was all one word
with a capital L. It was late at night, the lights were dimmed and it
was behing a bar.
The design of the exterior of the machine was stainless, with blue
lights. I'll take a closer look next time I go.

Shane



 
Date: 11 Apr 2007 17:21:21
From: Jasonian
Subject: Re: Black Gold on PBS
The espresso machine looked interesting, I cannot recall what
> the name was La-something. It was not a La Marzocco. It has E-61
> groups and cool looking buttons that were lit up with a soft blue
> glow.
La San Marco? La Cimbali? La Pavoni?



 
Date: 11 Apr 2007 23:15:13
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Black Gold on PBS
On 11 Apr 2007 06:40:40 -0700, "shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote:

>The documentary film "Black Gold" was broadcast on my local PBS
>affiliate. I am not sure if it has gone USA wide or not. The film is
>about the global coffee consumption and how coffee production affects
>farmers in Ethiopia and the farmers trying to get a fair price for
>their coffee.

Local broadcast schedules are here:
http://itvs.org/search/broadcast.htm?showID=1168 . (This Saturday at
9pm in Los Angeles). Be prepared for a lot of very real human misery.

I was on a panel discussion of it at a screening in Beverly Hills two
weeks ago. Since the panel also included Ted Lingle, Tim Castle and
Ric Rhinehart, we were able to give the audience a pretty full picture
of the many efforts going on to help the farmers, in addition to the
Fair Trade promoted by the film.

If you blink, you will miss the farmer explaining that the Ethiopian
government dictates which plot of land he must farm on, which
hamstrings his ability to be more productive. The film makers give the
Ethiopian government a free pass, while focusing their angst on
Western institutions.

The film also uses some misdirection to imply the WTO is also at
fault, which is irrelevant in the case of coffee, since coffee trade
is not subject to WTO treaties.

For those who have attended SCAA conferences and barista competitions,
you will see some familiar faces.

Marshall


 
Date: 11 Apr 2007 10:19:09
From: Zeek!
Subject: Re: Black Gold on PBS
On 11 Apr 2007 06:40:40 -0700, "shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote:

>The documentary film "Black Gold" was broadcast on my local PBS
>affiliate. I am not sure if it has gone USA wide or not. The film is
>about the global coffee consumption and how coffee production affects
>farmers in Ethiopia and the farmers trying to get a fair price for
>their coffee.
>
>Odd how it often happens that you hear something and than hear the
>same thing again in a short time. Black Gold mentions Peace Coffee, a
>roaster in Minneapolis. A new burrito restaraunt opened last week
>near me, they have an espresso machine and buy their coffee from Peace
>Coffee. The espresso machine looked interesting, I cannot recall what
>the name was La-something. It was not a La Marzocco. It has E-61
>groups and cool looking buttons that were lit up with a soft blue
>glow. One of the employees was telling me about Peace Coffee,
>evidently they deliver all of their coffee by bicycle. Cool idea,
>bicycle delivery of Fair trade coffee, but is their coffee any
>good?
>
>I videotaped the movie and I will have to watch it again, as I
>probably missed a few things.
>
>Shane

Saw the preview ad for it last night while watching China Blue. I
remember seeing beans roasting on a flat pan over a fire. Should be
interesting. My next chance to see it is Sunday at 3 am in Nashville.
That's an odd time.

http://www.pbs.org/independentlens/blackgold/