coffee-forum.net
Promoting coffee discussion.

Main
Date: 21 Sep 2006 23:51:11
From:
Subject: Bottled water hardness question...
Hi There - I am new to this group.

I tried reading up on how to calculate water hardness based on the
label on a bottle of water (using a long post from "Jim"), but couldn't
hack through the technical sides of the document.

I was wondering if anyone could help to tell me if the following
composition is a great vs decent vs poor choice for the "scaling" and
"taste" factors for my espresso machine (Vetrano by Quick Mill).

The water is called AO and is from Quebec. Here is what is on the
label:
PPM
Ca: 17
Cl: 2
HCO3: 98
K: 1
Mg: 4
Na: 12
SO4: 6
As, Cu, NO3, Pb, Zn: 0

Thanks - any help is most appreciated!





 
Date: 25 Sep 2006 22:14:45
From:
Subject: Re: Bottled water hardness question...
Oops!

I was logged in as my roommate in that last post... It is from me!

Sorry about the confusion...



 
Date: 25 Sep 2006 17:55:45
From:
Subject: Re: Bottled water hardness question...
Hi Jack -

Thanks for your suggestion. I took it upon myself to re-read Jim's long
water hardness FAQ, and I think I figured out how to calculate the
hardness:

"to get hardness multiply the calcium by 2.5, the magnesium by 4.2, and
add the two"... which plugging in my numbers results in 59.3 mg/l CaCO3
equivalents.

Which, apparently, divided by 17.2 results in 3.4 grains. Seems OK...
have I made a mistake?

Cheers!

Jack Denver wrote:
> Roughly speaking the total hardness would be the Ca + the HCO3 (bicarbonate)
> plus the Mg, around 120 PPM total, which is a little hard for espresso
> water. Since most of the hardness is bicarbonate ("temporary") , you could
> get rid of it by boiling the water before use and letting it settle, then
> decanting. If you do this inside the boiler, it will precipitate in there
> and lead to scaling. From a taste POV such a water is probably good but not
> the best thing for your machine. You could cut it 50/50 with distilled or
> RO water and have a good compromise between taste and scaling.
>
>
> <dmhost@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1158907871.830988.95990@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> > Hi There - I am new to this group.
> >
> > I tried reading up on how to calculate water hardness based on the
> > label on a bottle of water (using a long post from "Jim"), but couldn't
> > hack through the technical sides of the document.
> >
> > I was wondering if anyone could help to tell me if the following
> > composition is a great vs decent vs poor choice for the "scaling" and
> > "taste" factors for my espresso machine (Vetrano by Quick Mill).
> >
> > The water is called AO and is from Quebec. Here is what is on the
> > label:
> > PPM
> > Ca: 17
> > Cl: 2
> > HCO3: 98
> > K: 1
> > Mg: 4
> > Na: 12
> > SO4: 6
> > As, Cu, NO3, Pb, Zn: 0
> >
> > Thanks - any help is most appreciated!
> >



 
Date: 25 Sep 2006 13:22:45
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Bottled water hardness question...
Roughly speaking the total hardness would be the Ca + the HCO3 (bicarbonate)
plus the Mg, around 120 PPM total, which is a little hard for espresso
water. Since most of the hardness is bicarbonate ("temporary") , you could
get rid of it by boiling the water before use and letting it settle, then
decanting. If you do this inside the boiler, it will precipitate in there
and lead to scaling. From a taste POV such a water is probably good but not
the best thing for your machine. You could cut it 50/50 with distilled or
RO water and have a good compromise between taste and scaling.


<dmhost@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1158907871.830988.95990@h48g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> Hi There - I am new to this group.
>
> I tried reading up on how to calculate water hardness based on the
> label on a bottle of water (using a long post from "Jim"), but couldn't
> hack through the technical sides of the document.
>
> I was wondering if anyone could help to tell me if the following
> composition is a great vs decent vs poor choice for the "scaling" and
> "taste" factors for my espresso machine (Vetrano by Quick Mill).
>
> The water is called AO and is from Quebec. Here is what is on the
> label:
> PPM
> Ca: 17
> Cl: 2
> HCO3: 98
> K: 1
> Mg: 4
> Na: 12
> SO4: 6
> As, Cu, NO3, Pb, Zn: 0
>
> Thanks - any help is most appreciated!
>




 
Date: 23 Sep 2006 23:22:37
From:
Subject: Re: Bottled water hardness question...
Thanks for your response -

I am not plumbing in the machine because I don't have that freedom in
my current living arrangement - therefore, I have the luxury of
deciding on which 5 gallon bottles to use for the machine.

Thanks!



 
Date: 23 Sep 2006 18:33:31
From:
Subject: Re: Bottled water hardness question...

dmhost@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi There - I am new to this group.
>
> I tried reading up on how to calculate water hardness based on the
> label on a bottle of water (using a long post from "Jim"), but couldn't
> hack through the technical sides of the document.
>
> I was wondering if anyone could help to tell me if the following
> composition is a great vs decent vs poor choice for the "scaling" and
> "taste" factors for my espresso machine (Vetrano by Quick Mill).
>
> The water is called AO and is from Quebec. Here is what is on the
> label:
> PPM
> Ca: 17
> Cl: 2
> HCO3: 98
> K: 1
> Mg: 4
> Na: 12
> SO4: 6
> As, Cu, NO3, Pb, Zn: 0
>
> Thanks - any help is most appreciated!

I've got a Vetrano too and plumbed it in with the water softening and
filter kit from Chris' Coffee. I can't help you with the mineral
content list of your bottled water but the filter kit Chris sells comes
with water hardness test strips and they're very easy to use. I'd
imagine a pharmacy or hardware store would carry test strips and I'd
find out from Chris' what an acceptable water hardness rating would be
for the Vetrano before softening or switching to a softer bottled water
would be advisable. Good luck.