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Date: 10 Dec 2006 11:24:02
From: bernie
Subject: Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
From today's Neew Yalk Times.
Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
2 dried pasilla chiles
1 six inch white corn tortilla
3 tablespoons unsalted butter
1 1/2 Cups chopped white onion
4 large cloves garlic
2 1/2 cups chicken stock
1/4 cup heavy cream
kosher salt
1 teaspoon ligh-brown sugar
3 tablespoons medium roast coffee beans finely ground
1 tablespoon cocoa powder
1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
1 2lb beef tenderloin roast, cut from the large end,
trimmed and tied at 1/2inch intervals with kitchen twine
Kosher salt and black pepper
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
3/4lb shitake musrooms, stemmed and quartered
sprigs of watercress

1. Seed, stem and cut the chilies into pieces. Tear the tortilla
into pieces. Set both aside, In a saucepan, melt 1 tablespoon butter
over medium-high heat. Add the onion and garlic and saute until
translucent, about 3 minutes. Add the chiles and tortilla and cook over
medium heat, stirring, until softened. Pour in the stock, bring to a
boil and then simmer, partly covered, for 10 minutes. Ina blender, puree
the hot mixture until smooth. Pour sthrough a fine sieve set over a
saucepan, pressing on the solids. Discard the solids. Whisk in dthe
cream, 1 teaspoon salt and the brown surgar. Season to taste.

2. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees. In a bowl, whisk together the
coffee, cocoa and cinnamon. pat the beef tdry and rub with 2 teaspoons
salt and 1 teaspoon pepper: then rub with oil. Sprinkle the coffee
mixture over a sheet of wax paper and coat the beef in it. Place the
beef on a rack set in a roasting pan and let stand at room temperature
for 30 minutes.

3. Roast the beef for 10 minutes; then lower the temperature to 250
and cook for an hour more, or until the meat reaches 130 degrees. Let
stand, loosely covered with foil, for 10 minutes. (the meat will
continue to cook, reaching about 135 degrees.)

4. Bring the broth to a boil and simmer until just thick enough to
coat the back of a spoon. Cover and keep warm.

5. In a large skillet, melt the remaining butter over medium-high
heat. Add the mushrooms and sute until golden. Season with salt and pepper.

6. Remove the twine and cut the beef into 1/2inch thick slices. Spoon
just enough broth to cover the bottoms of 4 to 6 shallow, wide soup
bowls. Add 2 to 3 slices of beef, spoon more broth over the beef if
desired and top with mushrooms and watercress. Serves 4 to 6.

Which coffee? Which wine?
Bernie




 
Date: 24 Dec 2006 13:42:22
From: John LaBella
Subject: Re: Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
In article <457c50c3@nntp.zianet.com >, bdigman@zianet.com says...
> From today's Neew Yalk Times.
> Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
> 2 dried pasilla chiles
> 1 six inch white corn tortilla
> 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
> 1 1/2 Cups chopped white onion
> 4 large cloves garlic
> 2 1/2 cups chicken stock
> 1/4 cup heavy cream
> kosher salt
> 1 teaspoon ligh-brown sugar
> 3 tablespoons medium roast coffee beans finely ground
> 1 tablespoon cocoa powder
> 1/8 teaspoon ground cinnamon
> 1 2lb beef tenderloin roast, cut from the large end,
> trimmed and tied at 1/2inch intervals with kitchen twine
> Kosher salt and black pepper
> 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
> 3/4lb shitake musrooms, stemmed and quartered
> sprigs of watercress
>
As you aren't really drinking it ... maybe a use for some of that Viet
you have around. But on reflection of don't cook with what you wouldn't
drink.... You will want something that meld with the flavours -
chocolaty hint of spice and rich.

Can't see a wine mentioned in the recipe ... twine is...

But looking at the contents you will want something Massive in taste
nothing light a good Cab or Merlot ... but then again what do you like?
If your prefernce is for a "fruity (said with a scottish accent) wine"
then go for it. After all no matter what I say or what experts (X=unkown
quantity Spurt=drip under pressure) You are the one eating and or
drinking it.



 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 16:06:45
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
On Sun, 10 Dec 2006 11:24:02 -0700, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote:


>Which coffee? Which wine?
>Bernie


If you're really wanting to prepare beef with coffee, I submit:

SHORT RIBS BRAISED IN COFFEE ANCHO CHILE SAUCE
Chef Robert Del Grande of Cafe Annie, in Houston, serves a fillet of
beef with a coffee chile sauce — we think the flavor combination also
works well with the succulence of short ribs. We recommend serving
these ribs over soft polenta.

Active time: 40 min Start to finish: 4 1/2 hr

4 dried ancho chiles, stemmed, seeded, and ribs discarded
2 cups boiling-hot water
1 medium onion, quartered
3 garlic cloves, coarsely chopped
2 tablespoons finely chopped canned chipotle chiles in adobo plus 2
teaspoons adobo sauce
2 tablespoons pure maple syrup
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
3 teaspoons salt
6 lb beef short ribs
1 teaspoon black pepper
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1/2 cup brewed coffee

Preheat oven to 350°F.

Soak ancho chiles in boiling-hot water until softened, about 20
minutes, then drain in a colander set over a bowl. Taste soaking
liquid: It will be a little bitter, but if unpleasantly so, discard
it; otherwise, reserve for braising. Transfer ancho chiles to a
blender and purée with onion, garlic, chipotles with sauce, maple
syrup, lime juice, and 1 teaspoon salt.

Pat ribs dry and sprinkle with pepper and remaining 2 teaspoons salt.
Heat oil in a 12-inch heavy skillet over moderately high heat until
hot but not smoking, then brown ribs in 3 batches, turning
occasionally, about 5 minutes per batch. Transfer as browned to a
roasting pan just large enough to hold ribs in 1 layer.

Carefully add chile purée to fat remaining in skillet (use caution,
since it will splatter and steam) and cook over moderately low heat,
stirring frequently, 5 minutes. Add reserved chile soaking liquid (or
1 1/2 cups water) and coffee and bring to a boil, then pour over ribs
(liquid should come about halfway up sides of meat).

And for Bernie's wine questions: Beer. Lots of it. For the coffee, use
the coffee-est coffee you have. A nice San Salvador or Colombia is
perfect.

Trust me, I've tried a bunch of them: this is the best coffee&beef
recipe you'll find. I've found that if I want to cook with coffee,
ancho chile is the perfect foil.

Of course you'll have to eat sprouts, brown rice and tofu for a week
as penance.

Seems I did not reference the source on this one, although credit is
in the text.







_______________________________________
Please Note: If you find a posting or message from me
offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate.


 
Date: 10 Dec 2006 18:46:50
From: Bertie Doe
Subject: Re: Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef

"bernie" wrote in message
> From today's Neew Yalk Times.
> Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
> 2 dried pasilla chiles
> 1 six inch white corn tortilla
> 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
> 1 1/2 Cups chopped white onion
> 4 large cloves garlic
> 2 1/2 cups chicken stock
> 1/4 cup heavy cream
> kosher salt

This has got me puzzled, which have unsalted butter, then add kosher salt.
What is meant by kosher salt? Do they mean kosher as in real? i.e. No salt
substitute?

> Which coffee? Which wine?
> Bernie

That's easy ....... kosher coffee and wine, no substitutes on this group!!

Bertie




  
Date: 10 Dec 2006 13:20:49
From: DougW
Subject: Re: Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
Bertie Doe wrote:

> This has got me puzzled, which have unsalted butter, then add kosher
> salt. What is meant by kosher salt? Do they mean kosher as in real?
> i.e. No salt substitute?

It's just regular (non iodized) salt but with larger crystals. Kosher
salt isn't "Kosher" it is just used in the salting and soaking process
for making meats Kosher by removing traces of blood.

--
DougW




  
Date: 10 Dec 2006 13:56:43
From: Alice Faber
Subject: Re: Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
In article <4u330uF16dk42U1@mid.individual.net >,
"Bertie Doe" <montebrasite4@ntl.com > wrote:

> "bernie" wrote in message
> > From today's Neew Yalk Times.
> > Coffee-Roasted Fillet of Beef
> > 2 dried pasilla chiles
> > 1 six inch white corn tortilla
> > 3 tablespoons unsalted butter
> > 1 1/2 Cups chopped white onion
> > 4 large cloves garlic
> > 2 1/2 cups chicken stock
> > 1/4 cup heavy cream
> > kosher salt
>
> This has got me puzzled, which have unsalted butter, then add kosher salt.
> What is meant by kosher salt? Do they mean kosher as in real? i.e. No salt
> substitute?
>

Kosher salt is a coarser salt than regular table salt.

--
AF
"Non Sequitur U has a really, really lousy debate team."
--artyw raises the bar on rec.sport.baseball