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Date: 28 May 2007 08:15:27
From:
Subject: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
Some of you may have made your own Coffee Bean Coolers using the
vacuum/5 gallon bucket method w/drilled out stainless bowl insert.
One of the problems I have encountered in making these is that the
hose that goes from the cooler to the vacuum tends to collapse, if not
melt, from the high heat of the beans it is trying to cool. I have
found an easy solution to this and am passing it along to those here
that have problem now.

All you need to do is purchase hot water tubing that is the same
outside diameter as the inside diameter of your vacuum hose. Cut
about the same length and insert it into the vacuum hose. Drill a
couple of rivet holes through the now vacuum/hot water hose combo
(where it goes into the cooler). Rivet the holes (maybe after putting
a bit of silicone rubber on outside of the hot water tube before you
fully insert it into the vacuum hose ... this will seal that end
well). Riveting that area will prevent any slippage of that hose
inside of the vacuum hose.

That has taken care of any problem I have had with the heat issue.

Len
=====================
http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com





 
Date: 29 May 2007 16:46:21
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On May 29, 6:58 pm, "Brent" <m...@privacy.net > wrote:
> what weight of beans are we talking?
>
> When I use our Rosto I dump the beans into a colander, and vacuum from
> underneath the colander - takes about a minute to get the beans to ambient
> temps on about 120 grams
>
> Brent
>
>
>
> >> > or you could use metal hose.
>
> >> Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
> >> top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
> >> enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.
>
> > Having the vacuum sucking the air from the cooler is handier for me,
> > at least, in that it also sucks all the chaff off the beans and right
> > into the vacuum. Lot less mess.
>
> > Len
> > =======================
> >http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

5 lbs. of beans

Len

============
http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com



  
Date: 30 May 2007 12:03:00
From: Brent
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
>> what weight of beans are we talking?
>>
>> Brent
>
> 5 lbs. of beans
>
> Len
>

Len, see my other post - that could be a way of doing it. Here in NZ you can
get aluminium ducting which has a better heat rating :)

Brent




 
Date: 30 May 2007 10:56:40
From: Brent
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
Have a look at bathroom ventilation.

Inline fan for a shower is going to handle heat and moisture, both of which
will be present...

I saw a friends setup where he takes the beans from the cooling tray and
dumps them in a box that has a mesh bottom, and an extractor fan underneath,
he reckons it works brilliantly, and he only has to wait a minute or so from
the end of the roast to transfer the beans (after the smoke has stopped, and
he doesn't need the afterburner - yep a commercial setup, but the concept is
the same)

Brent

> Some of you may have made your own Coffee Bean Coolers using the
> vacuum/5 gallon bucket method w/drilled out stainless bowl insert.
> One of the problems I have encountered in making these is that the
> hose that goes from the cooler to the vacuum tends to collapse, if not
> melt, from the high heat of the beans it is trying to cool. I have
> found an easy solution to this and am passing it along to those here
> that have problem now.
>
> All you need to do is purchase hot water tubing that is the same
> outside diameter as the inside diameter of your vacuum hose. Cut
> about the same length and insert it into the vacuum hose. Drill a
> couple of rivet holes through the now vacuum/hot water hose combo
> (where it goes into the cooler). Rivet the holes (maybe after putting
> a bit of silicone rubber on outside of the hot water tube before you
> fully insert it into the vacuum hose ... this will seal that end
> well). Riveting that area will prevent any slippage of that hose
> inside of the vacuum hose.
>
> That has taken care of any problem I have had with the heat issue.
>
> Len
> =====================
> http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com
>




  
Date: 30 May 2007 03:43:20
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On Wed, 30 May 2007 10:56:40 +1200, "Brent" <me@privacy.net > wrote:

>I saw a friends setup where he takes the beans from the cooling tray and
>dumps them in a box that has a mesh bottom, and an extractor fan underneath,
>he reckons it works brilliantly,

i made a wee one of that type out of a muffin fan, mesh fan guard, and
a coffee can, along with bits of metal to give it form. works great
for cooling sample roasts.



 
Date: 29 May 2007 15:52:11
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On May 29, 5:27 pm, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com > wrote:
> On May 29, 4:06 pm, Fraser <Fra...@server1.example.com> wrote:
>
> > On 2007-05-29, Barry Jarrett <b...@rileys-coffee.com> wrote:
>
> > > or you could use metal hose.
>
> > Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
> > top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
> > enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.
>
> Try looking at woodworking shops they have various vacuum adapters
> used for dust collection. You could always hook up a 4 inch dust
> collector hose to the bottom of the thing. I would think a 4 inch
> hose would move enough air to dissipate any heat created enough to not
> melt a plastic hose, if not, 4 inch metal ducting is easy to find.
>
> How many beans are you cooling?
>
> Shane

5 lbs. at a time. The hot water hose addition I recommend costs only
about $5 cost, within most anyones budget.

Its not just about melting the hose that is the issue. The very high
heat of the beans softens most vacuum hoses, and with the suction
created by putting the beans in the stainless bowl you get instant
collapse of the hose. The hot water hose reinforcement remedies that
at minimal work and cost.

Len
================
http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com



 
Date: 29 May 2007 15:47:49
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On May 29, 5:06 pm, Fraser <Fra...@server1.example.com > wrote:
> On 2007-05-29, Barry Jarrett <b...@rileys-coffee.com> wrote:
>
> > or you could use metal hose.
>
> Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
> top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
> enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.

Having the vacuum sucking the air from the cooler is handier for me,
at least, in that it also sucks all the chaff off the beans and right
into the vacuum. Lot less mess.

Len
=======================
http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com



  
Date: 30 May 2007 10:58:08
From: Brent
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
what weight of beans are we talking?

When I use our Rosto I dump the beans into a colander, and vacuum from
underneath the colander - takes about a minute to get the beans to ambient
temps on about 120 grams

Brent

>> > or you could use metal hose.
>>
>> Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
>> top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
>> enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.
>
> Having the vacuum sucking the air from the cooler is handier for me,
> at least, in that it also sucks all the chaff off the beans and right
> into the vacuum. Lot less mess.
>
> Len
> =======================
> http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com
>




 
Date: 29 May 2007 14:27:21
From: shane
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On May 29, 4:06 pm, Fraser <Fra...@server1.example.com > wrote:
> On 2007-05-29, Barry Jarrett <b...@rileys-coffee.com> wrote:
>
> > or you could use metal hose.
>
> Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
> top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
> enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.

Try looking at woodworking shops they have various vacuum adapters
used for dust collection. You could always hook up a 4 inch dust
collector hose to the bottom of the thing. I would think a 4 inch
hose would move enough air to dissipate any heat created enough to not
melt a plastic hose, if not, 4 inch metal ducting is easy to find.

How many beans are you cooling?

Shane



 
Date: 29 May 2007 12:29:51
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On May 29, 1:28 pm, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net > wrote:
> what kind of hot water tubing are you talking about? Vac hose is usually 1
> 1/4 inches - I'm not familiar with water tubing that is anywhere near that
> big.
>
...snip...
> > Len
> > =====================
> >http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

I purchase the stuff at Lowes. The vacuums I use are the Shop vacs.
The tubing is black reinforced rubber like material used for hot water
(radiator type hose I believe, like the kind you find in cars). It is
located in the water hose department.

Len

=========================
http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com




 
Date: 29 May 2007 13:28:10
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
what kind of hot water tubing are you talking about? Vac hose is usually 1
1/4 inches - I'm not familiar with water tubing that is anywhere near that
big.


<admin@coffeeroastersclub.com > wrote in message
news:1180365326.967926.207120@o5g2000hsb.googlegroups.com...
> Some of you may have made your own Coffee Bean Coolers using the
> vacuum/5 gallon bucket method w/drilled out stainless bowl insert.
> One of the problems I have encountered in making these is that the
> hose that goes from the cooler to the vacuum tends to collapse, if not
> melt, from the high heat of the beans it is trying to cool. I have
> found an easy solution to this and am passing it along to those here
> that have problem now.
>
> All you need to do is purchase hot water tubing that is the same
> outside diameter as the inside diameter of your vacuum hose. Cut
> about the same length and insert it into the vacuum hose. Drill a
> couple of rivet holes through the now vacuum/hot water hose combo
> (where it goes into the cooler). Rivet the holes (maybe after putting
> a bit of silicone rubber on outside of the hot water tube before you
> fully insert it into the vacuum hose ... this will seal that end
> well). Riveting that area will prevent any slippage of that hose
> inside of the vacuum hose.
>
> That has taken care of any problem I have had with the heat issue.
>
> Len
> =====================
> http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com
>




 
Date: 29 May 2007 02:59:19
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue

or you could use metal hose.



  
Date: 30 May 2007 09:06:16
From: Fraser
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On 2007-05-29, Barry Jarrett <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:
>
> or you could use metal hose.
>
Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.


   
Date: 30 May 2007 03:41:27
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
On 30 May 2007 09:06:16 +1200, Fraser <Fraser@server1.example.com >
wrote:

>Why not have it blow, rather than suck? You would need a mesh over the
>top that's fine enough to stop the beans blowing out, but coarse
>enough for any remaining chaff to blow off.


really really messy.

i guess if you're roasting outside that's not an issue, though.



  
Date: 29 May 2007 06:15:26
From: Bill (Adopt)
Subject: Re: Coffee Bean Cooler Hose Issue
In article <ro5n53572ngbor6a4l6hc1bsd5keq2ohlj@4ax.com >,
Barry Jarrett <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:

> or you could use metal hose.

..or the Chef's favourite milk pan... ;'))

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