coffee-forum.net
Promoting coffee discussion.

Main
Date: 24 Dec 2006 10:26:57
From: Kyle
Subject: Coffee Beer Recommendation
Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
the perfect beer for coffee lovers.





 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 09:22:08
From: Kyle
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

Ed Needham wrote:
> KY Breakfast is only sold bottled as far as I know. ...and only available
> for a couple months when it does arrive. Founders has increased the volume,
> but it will be next year before it is ready.
> Ipswitch is a good stout. Thick and chewy. Yum.

I'll definitely keep my eyes out for KY Breakfast. The store where I
found Breakfast Stout also had founders Black Rye, and their Scotch
Ale. They all sound good.



  
Date: 29 Dec 2006 18:42:03
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
I'm particularly fond of bourbon stouts and porters. KY Breakfast pushes
just about all my buttons and is best served in a brandy snifter. I like
the Hommel stemware for this one.
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"Kyle" <kylejj64@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:1167412928.628687.34620@a3g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>
> Ed Needham wrote:
>> KY Breakfast is only sold bottled as far as I know. ...and only
>> available
>> for a couple months when it does arrive. Founders has increased the
>> volume,
>> but it will be next year before it is ready.
>> Ipswitch is a good stout. Thick and chewy. Yum.
>
> I'll definitely keep my eyes out for KY Breakfast. The store where I
> found Breakfast Stout also had founders Black Rye, and their Scotch
> Ale. They all sound good.
>




 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 09:19:28
From: Kyle
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

Roque wrote:

> Had a look at the lists. Surprised to find my "local" as number 1 and
> number 4 in the USA among beer bars. I frequently have a beer (with a
> sausage purchased next door and taken in) at the Toronado. Knew it was
> a great list, but never thought it ranked that highly on a national
> scale.

I've been to the Toronado. The cool thing was, they had Sierra
Nevada's Pale Bock (one of my favorite non-stout beers), which has
become a true rarity since SN stopped bottling it in '99 or so.

Further up Haight, I've had some good pints (of Stout of Circumstance
and Proving Ground Pale) at the Magnolia.



 
Date: 28 Dec 2006 10:23:27
From: Kyle
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

Ed Needham wrote:
> I hate to give up one of my favorite 'fishin holes', but Founders makes a
> seasonal beer called Founders Kentucky Breakfast, that's very close to the
> Breakfast stout but aged a year in bourbon barrels. OMG...
> Founders, Bells and Rogue can do no wrong in my book. I'm a bit spoiled
> since I live two blocks from RichO's/New Albanian Brewery and have easy
> access to just about any brew I would want from all over the world.
> http://www.newalbanian.com/
> Ratebeer.com and beeradvocate both rated RichO's as one of the top 3 and top
> 19 (respectively) best places to find and drink great beers.
> http://www.ratebeer.com/ratebeerbest/table.asp?title=Best+Beer+Bars+in+the+United+States&file=bars_usa_places.csv
>
> http://beeradvocate.com/acbw/2006/places

Rogue's Shakespeare Stout was my favorite non-imperial stout before I
discovered Mercury Brewing's Ipswich Stout (which is even earthier and
more robust). Rogue's imperial stout and Mogul Ale are also favorites
of mine. Bell's Expedition Stout, Eccentric Ale, and Two-Hearted Ale
are fine brews. I wish I could try more of the Bell's brews, but
they're not sold anywhere near where I live (MA.). Fortunately I now
have access to some of the Founders brews. Is the Kentucky Breakfast
bottled?

If you're ever in MA., be sure to find some Ipswich Oatmeal Stout.



  
Date: 28 Dec 2006 19:21:49
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
KY Breakfast is only sold bottled as far as I know. ...and only available
for a couple months when it does arrive. Founders has increased the volume,
but it will be next year before it is ready.
Ipswitch is a good stout. Thick and chewy. Yum.
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"Kyle" <kylejj64@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:1167330207.118916.167560@48g2000cwx.googlegroups.com...
>
> Rogue's Shakespeare Stout was my favorite non-imperial stout before I
> discovered Mercury Brewing's Ipswich Stout (which is even earthier and
> more robust). Rogue's imperial stout and Mogul Ale are also favorites
> of mine. Bell's Expedition Stout, Eccentric Ale, and Two-Hearted Ale
> are fine brews. I wish I could try more of the Bell's brews, but
> they're not sold anywhere near where I live (MA.). Fortunately I now
> have access to some of the Founders brews. Is the Kentucky Breakfast
> bottled?
>
> If you're ever in MA., be sure to find some Ipswich Oatmeal Stout.
>




 
Date: 27 Dec 2006 12:57:30
From: shane
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
Slightly off topic, but my favorite beer at the Brewhouse, which once
did an Espresso stout, is called "Big Boat Oatmeal Stout". Luckily the
Oatmeal stout is popular and one of their regular brews.

Shane

Kyle wrote:
> shane wrote:
> > I am probably over simplifying history a tad, but before the Industrial
> > revolution and machines that could kill you if you were not careful,
> > didn't a lot of people drink during the day? With bad water
> > purification, beer was the only thing safe to drink. Hence breakfast
> > stout. Coffee came along and gave people a beveage that help the
> > Europeans become more productive and then take over much of the rest of
> > the world. The current business office structure was even descended
> > from coffeehouses.
>
> There were times when low-strength alcoholic beverages were used in the
> way that we use water (or juice or coffee, etc.) today. There are
> Trappist monasteries where low-strength beers are made for the monks'
> daily consumption -- in contrast to Trappist breweries' commercially
> available beers, which are on the potent side. In the case of Founders
> Breakfast Stout, the "breakfast" most likely refers to the beer's oat
> and coffee (common breakfast items) components. Its grist comprises
> oats as well as barley malt. Oats are good in beer because they add a
> beautiful, smooth texture (as well as flavor and aroma, if enough are
> used, as in Ipswich Oatmeal Stout).



 
Date: 27 Dec 2006 11:55:47
From: Kyle
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

Ed Needham wrote:
> Founders Breakfast Stout is incredible.

I'm delighted that someone else in here as tried and enjoyed it. I
only first encountered Founders' brews recently. Many of them look
very interesting, but I had to go for the strong coffee stout first.



  
Date: 28 Dec 2006 01:06:57
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
I hate to give up one of my favorite 'fishin holes', but Founders makes a
seasonal beer called Founders Kentucky Breakfast, that's very close to the
Breakfast stout but aged a year in bourbon barrels. OMG...
Founders, Bells and Rogue can do no wrong in my book. I'm a bit spoiled
since I live two blocks from RichO's/New Albanian Brewery and have easy
access to just about any brew I would want from all over the world.
http://www.newalbanian.com/
Ratebeer.com and beeradvocate both rated RichO's as one of the top 3 and top
19 (respectively) best places to find and drink great beers.
http://www.ratebeer.com/ratebeerbest/table.asp?title=Best+Beer+Bars+in+the+United+States&file=bars_usa_places.csv

http://beeradvocate.com/acbw/2006/places
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"Kyle" <kylejj64@yahoo.com > wrote in message
news:1167249347.021829.126440@73g2000cwn.googlegroups.com...
>
> Ed Needham wrote:
>> Founders Breakfast Stout is incredible.
>
> I'm delighted that someone else in here as tried and enjoyed it. I
> only first encountered Founders' brews recently. Many of them look
> very interesting, but I had to go for the strong coffee stout first.
>




   
Date: 28 Dec 2006 13:07:42
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
On Thu, 28 Dec 2006 01:06:57 -0500, "Ed Needham"
<ed@NOSPAMhomeroaster.com > wrote:

>I hate to give up one of my favorite 'fishin holes', but Founders makes a
>seasonal beer called Founders Kentucky Breakfast, that's very close to the
>Breakfast stout but aged a year in bourbon barrels. OMG...
>Founders, Bells and Rogue can do no wrong in my book. I'm a bit spoiled
>since I live two blocks from RichO's/New Albanian Brewery and have easy
>access to just about any brew I would want from all over the world.
>http://www.newalbanian.com/
>Ratebeer.com and beeradvocate both rated RichO's as one of the top 3 and top
>19 (respectively) best places to find and drink great beers.
>http://www.ratebeer.com/ratebeerbest/table.asp?title=Best+Beer+Bars+in+the+United+States&file=bars_usa_places.csv
>
>http://beeradvocate.com/acbw/2006/places


Had a look at the lists. Surprised to find my "local" as number 1 and
number 4 in the USA among beer bars. I frequently have a beer (with a
sausage purchased next door and taken in) at the Toronado. Knew it was
a great list, but never thought it ranked that highly on a national
scale.

And, the sausages are fantastic.






_______________________________________
Please Note: If you find a posting or message from me
offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate.


 
Date: 27 Dec 2006 11:53:42
From: Kyle
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

shane wrote:
> I am probably over simplifying history a tad, but before the Industrial
> revolution and machines that could kill you if you were not careful,
> didn't a lot of people drink during the day? With bad water
> purification, beer was the only thing safe to drink. Hence breakfast
> stout. Coffee came along and gave people a beveage that help the
> Europeans become more productive and then take over much of the rest of
> the world. The current business office structure was even descended
> from coffeehouses.

There were times when low-strength alcoholic beverages were used in the
way that we use water (or juice or coffee, etc.) today. There are
Trappist monasteries where low-strength beers are made for the monks'
daily consumption -- in contrast to Trappist breweries' commercially
available beers, which are on the potent side. In the case of Founders
Breakfast Stout, the "breakfast" most likely refers to the beer's oat
and coffee (common breakfast items) components. Its grist comprises
oats as well as barley malt. Oats are good in beer because they add a
beautiful, smooth texture (as well as flavor and aroma, if enough are
used, as in Ipswich Oatmeal Stout).



 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 22:12:54
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

shane wrote:
> I am probably over simplifying history a tad, but before the Industrial
> revolution and machines that could kill you if you were not careful,
> didn't a lot of people drink during the day? With bad water
> purification, beer was the only thing safe to drink. Hence breakfast
> stout. Coffee came along and gave people a beveage that help the
> Europeans become more productive and then take over much of the rest of
> the world. The current business office structure was even descended
> from coffeehouses.

Except for the British, whose bane it was to carry a legacy for gin
into the Industrial Revolution aways after near epidemic proportions
prior. Just because water wasn't safe to drink neither stopped people
from drinking it, more or less than should wine or beer readily avail
itself. When people became sick, largely for drinking fecal water
waste, they instead blamed visiting notables from a providence of the
stars, not the water. Coffee was in a class by itself, neither
addictive nor a depressant, without religiosity, but congenial,
club-like and social. Like Starbucks -- although not without instances
of consternation aroused from a governing guidance concerned with an
effect coffee imposed on society. The business office structure is how
shipping trade barters were conducted, insomuch a selfsame source
coffee arose from, into social awareness, as a commodity the Dutch
introduced to the Continent for subsequent trade. In but one such
structure, being a coffeehouse to conduct trading affairs of a
profitable nature, as distinctly seen apart from other coffeehouses,
where different matters were disposed -- in manner and interest
entirely suited an ambience coffeehouses freely lent themselves. The
business office structure as a coffeehouse, where equities came to be
traded is allied to the Old World -- whereas Wall Street's significance
bordered upon a wall to conveniently seperate the adjacent pigs from
tramping grounds reserved beneath an oak tree -- where New World
traders congregated to a business apart from their Continental
counterparts, apart as a capitalist persuasion allied to coffeehouses.
I rather suspect they all sat around dranking beer and ale beneath that
tree. As British colonies, the New World savannahs, and aways farther
north were considered immoderately climatic, enough that King George of
England provided extraordinary pay incentives to colonial
representatives by way of compensation in the order of foreign services.



 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 15:41:36
From: DaveW
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
Lagunita's Cappuccino Stout is pretty damn good for a coffee beer. In
fact all their beers are great and worth a try if you are into beer.



 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 14:44:55
From: shane
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
I am probably over simplifying history a tad, but before the Industrial
revolution and machines that could kill you if you were not careful,
didn't a lot of people drink during the day? With bad water
purification, beer was the only thing safe to drink. Hence breakfast
stout. Coffee came along and gave people a beveage that help the
Europeans become more productive and then take over much of the rest of
the world. The current business office structure was even descended
from coffeehouses.

Shane


Ed Needham wrote:
> Founders Breakfast Stout is incredible.
> --
> *********************
> Ed Needham=AE
> "to absurdity and beyond!"
> http://www.homeroaster.com
> (include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
> *********************
>
> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
> news:12p311bhm0jt7b1@corp.supernews.com...
> > Somehow "8.3% alcohol" and "BREAKFAST stout" don't seem to go together.
> > I'll give it a try if I can find it, but probably NOT for breakfast!
> >
> > Kyle wrote:
> <SNIP> Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
> >> gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
> >> 8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
> >> the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
> >> flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
> >> the perfect beer for coffee lovers.
> >>



  
Date: 27 Dec 2006 14:27:53
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
Most of the beer was brewed quickly and consumed quickly, so the alcohol
content of the 'daily beer' was not usually very high.
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote in message
news:1167173095.573703.310310@n51g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
I am probably over simplifying history a tad, but before the Industrial
revolution and machines that could kill you if you were not careful,
didn't a lot of people drink during the day? With bad water
purification, beer was the only thing safe to drink. Hence breakfast
stout. Coffee came along and gave people a beveage that help the
Europeans become more productive and then take over much of the rest of
the world. The current business office structure was even descended
from coffeehouses.

Shane




 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 12:21:05
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
Somehow "8.3% alcohol" and "BREAKFAST stout" don't seem to go together.
I'll give it a try if I can find it, but probably NOT for breakfast!

Kyle wrote:

> Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
> surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
> coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
> come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
> opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
> light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
> overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
> in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
> Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
> flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
> coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
> gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
> 8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
> the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
> flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
> the perfect beer for coffee lovers.
>


  
Date:
From:
Subject:


 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 06:19:22
From: shane
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
The local brewpub I frequent once made a batch of espresso stout. I
thought it was good, but they haven't made it since. I don't think
enough people liked it.

Shane


Kyle wrote:
> Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
> surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
> coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
> come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
> opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
> light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
> overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
> in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
> Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
> flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
> coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
> gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
> 8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
> the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
> flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
> the perfect beer for coffee lovers.



 
Date: 25 Dec 2006 12:24:08
From: Kyle
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

T-Bag wrote:
> Kyle wrote:
> > Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
> > surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
> > coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
> > come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
> > opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
> > light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
> > overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
> > in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
> > Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
> > flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
> > coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
> > gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
> > 8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
> > the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
> > flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
> > the perfect beer for coffee lovers.
>
> Personally... the Chocolate Coffee Stout I brew every winter is my
> favorite.. :-)
>
> I start with the Milk Stout kit from northernbrewer.com, and add a few
> bars of dark chocolate, and about 16-24 oz of brewed espresso after the
> boil... very nice...
>
> You really do need a heavier stout with higher malt content in my
> opinion to blend the coffee and chocolate together in my opinion.. to
> many of the commercial attempts at a coffee stout wimp out on the malt
> content and result in a thin tasting feeble attempt that tries to
> please the masses.
>
> Another option I dont mind every now and then is to add a single shot
> of espresso to any old stout.. right in the glass... but the more
> subtle effect of adding 16oz to the 5 gallon brew jug is the preferred
> option...
>
> Left Hand brewing makes an outstanding Milk Stout by the way. Try one
> of those if you ever get a chance.. one of my favorites.

I've had that; it's pretty good. I've also tried Left Hand's imperial
stout. It's tasty, slightly vanilla extract-tasting, but a bit
light-colored and bodied for an imperial stout.

Mercury Brewing's Ipswich Oatmeal Stout has a lot of chocolate and
coffee tastes which are derived purely from malt. It's the richest,
most robust oatmeal stout ever. Another brew that I think most coffee
lovers would be into.



 
Date: 25 Dec 2006 11:14:39
From: T-Bag
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation

Kyle wrote:
> Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
> surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
> coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
> come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
> opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
> light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
> overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
> in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
> Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
> flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
> coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
> gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
> 8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
> the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
> flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
> the perfect beer for coffee lovers.

Personally... the Chocolate Coffee Stout I brew every winter is my
favorite.. :-)

I start with the Milk Stout kit from northernbrewer.com, and add a few
bars of dark chocolate, and about 16-24 oz of brewed espresso after the
boil... very nice...

You really do need a heavier stout with higher malt content in my
opinion to blend the coffee and chocolate together in my opinion.. to
many of the commercial attempts at a coffee stout wimp out on the malt
content and result in a thin tasting feeble attempt that tries to
please the masses.

Another option I dont mind every now and then is to add a single shot
of espresso to any old stout.. right in the glass... but the more
subtle effect of adding 16oz to the 5 gallon brew jug is the preferred
option...

Left Hand brewing makes an outstanding Milk Stout by the way. Try one
of those if you ever get a chance.. one of my favorites.

Tony B.



 
Date: 25 Dec 2006 05:51:18
From: JKevorkian
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
On 24 Dec 2006 10:26:57 -0800, "Kyle" <kylejj64@yahoo.com > wrote:

>Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
>surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
>coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
>come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
>opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
>light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
>overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
>in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
>Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
>flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
>coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
>gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
>8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
>the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
>flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
>the perfect beer for coffee lovers.

Does Drew Carey know about this?
He shoulda patented Buzz Beer when he had the chance.


 
Date: 24 Dec 2006 19:10:48
From: mattw
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
If you are ever in GA, try to get your hand on some Terrapin Wake N'
Bake. Great stout. They got together with the local roaster to make
up a blend specifically for the coffee. One of my favorite beers of
all time.

/mw

Kyle wrote:
> Brewers have been attempting to meld coffee and beer for decades -- no
> surprise, since darker (more roasted) barley can resemble dark-roasted
> coffee quite a lot. But in my opinion, most of these efforts haven't
> come out too well. Redhook Brewing's Coffee Stout failed, in my
> opinion, because it wasn't stouty enough; it was too thin-bodied and
> light-colored, and the coffee tastes, while pleasant enough,
> overwhelmed the malt. Dogfish Head's Chicory Stout fails, to my taste,
> in a similar way; it's just too damned light-bodied and mild. Z
> Street's Mocha Java Stout is a step in the right direction; the stout
> flavors are good, and it's overall a pleasant enough drink *except* the
> coffee isn't roasted enough. Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
> gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
> 8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
> the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
> flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
> the perfect beer for coffee lovers.



 
Date: 24 Dec 2006 13:05:59
From: North Sullivan
Subject: Re: Coffee Beer Recommendation
On 24 Dec 2006 10:26:57 -0800, "Kyle" <kylejj64@yahoo.com > wrote:
> Founders Breakfast Stout, however, really
>gets everything thing right. It's got a powerful, rich malt base, and
>8.3% ABV, so it's robust enough (almost an imperial stout) to support
>the heavy additions of coffee anf dark chocolate with which the brew is
>flavored. It's fantastic stuff, and it gets better as it warms. It's
>the perfect beer for coffee lovers.

I'll be keeping my eye open for this one; haven't seen it in local
stores yet. Founders Brewing has a "beer locator" page for finding
its product, but it isn't operational yet.

North Sullivan