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Date: 03 Sep 2007 16:19:36
From: Ken Blake
Subject: Coffee Filters
Several years ago, someone told me that drip coffee makers that use
the flat-bottomed "Mr. Coffee" type filters were superior to those
that use cone-shaped filters.

Is that true?

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup




 
Date: 04 Sep 2007 11:58:43
From: lockjaw
Subject: Re: Coffee Filters
On Sep 3, 9:25 pm, "Ed Needham"

>. . . . . Years ago, my wife (now ex) liked to use a Bunn coffeemaker. Bunn has a
> flat bottomed filter.

Reason enuf for divorce, Ed.


dave



 
Date: 03 Sep 2007 21:25:12
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Coffee Filters
Who told you that? I prefer the cone shaped filters like Chemex or Melitta.
For me, the taste is significantly better. I would think it's because of
better extraction. It's hard to bore a hole with the water stream through
the coffee in a cone filter.
Years ago, my wife (now ex) liked to use a Bunn coffeemaker. Bunn has a
flat bottomed filter. I retrofitted it with a #6 Melitta filter, which
interestingly, fit perfectly on top of the Bunn carafe, and the coffee
improved significantly.
--
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
*********************

"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain > wrote in message
news:gg5pd3d313428nb4phmve03dtgr97t79jf@4ax.com...
> Several years ago, someone told me that drip coffee makers that use
> the flat-bottomed "Mr. Coffee" type filters were superior to those
> that use cone-shaped filters.
>
> Is that true?
>
> --
> Ken Blake
> Please Reply to the Newsgroup




  
Date: 04 Sep 2007 16:09:21
From: *alan*
Subject: Re: Coffee Filters

"Ed Needham" <ed@NOSPAMhomeroaster.com > wrote in message
news:YpmdneMyZIavLkHbnZ2dnUVZ_jidnZ2d@insightbb.com...
> Who told you that? I prefer the cone shaped filters like Chemex or
> Melitta. For me, the taste is significantly better. I would think it's
> because of better extraction. It's hard to bore a hole with the water
> stream through the coffee in a cone filter.


Can you explain what you mean by "boring a hole with the water stream
therough the coffee" and why, assuming the composition and thickness of the
filter papers to be identical, a cone-shaped filter is going to produce
results differing from that of a flat-bottomed filter. I'm having a hard
time grasping the the physics of this concept. Thanks.

--alan



   
Date: 04 Sep 2007 19:42:05
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Coffee Filters
Some of the automatic coffeemakers slowly dribble the water out of a hole or
sprayhead and instead of evenly distributing the water over the thin layer
of coffee, it dribbles down and makes a little hole through the coffee and
pretty much misses the coffee as it goes through the filter. Some
coffeemakers heat and pour the water fast enough to actually float the
coffee, which I'm sure makes for better extraction and solves the boring
dribble problem.

Without really giving this 'flat vs. cone' phenomenon a whole lot of
thought, I can think of several reasons why I think it makes better coffee
(my subjective experience -AKA Hillbilly science).

-a flat bottomed filter spreads the coffee so it is much thinner than what
you would find with a cone filter. The water only has to percolate through
maybe a half inch of coffee at most before exiting the filter into the pot.
A cone filter concentrates the grinds so that the water must percolate
through two or more inches of grinds to get to the tip of the cone and drip
into the pot.

-I've heard that the best solvent for extracting something is itself. If
that is true, then coffee would extract coffee better than just hot water.
If the coffee has to percolate through a thicker layer of coffee, picking up
coffee oils and extracting as it goes through other grounds, the extraction
might be more effective than just a hot water extraction.

-With a cone filter, there is little chance of water finding it's way out of
the filter without hitting coffee. Not so with a flat bottomed filter.
Unless the spray pattern is variable, it is likely that the water will bore
a hole through the grinds and fail to extract much of the coffee goodness.
--
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
*********************


"*alan*" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:GAlDi.5541$z_5.5376@nlpi069.nbdc.sbc.com...
> Can you explain what you mean by "boring a hole with the water stream
> therough the coffee" and why, assuming the composition and thickness of
> the filter papers to be identical, a cone-shaped filter is going to
> produce results differing from that of a flat-bottomed filter. I'm having
> a hard time grasping the the physics of this concept. Thanks.
>
> --alan




  
Date: 03 Sep 2007 21:01:27
From: Ken Blake
Subject: Re: Coffee Filters
On Mon, 3 Sep 2007 21:25:12 -0400, "Ed Needham"
<ed@NOSPAMhomeroaster.com > wrote:

> Who told you that?


A friend, who said he read it somewhere. Nobody with any claim to
being an expert, which is why I asked here.


> I prefer the cone shaped filters like Chemex or Melitta.
> For me, the taste is significantly better. I would think it's because of
> better extraction. It's hard to bore a hole with the water stream through
> the coffee in a cone filter.
> Years ago, my wife (now ex) liked to use a Bunn coffeemaker. Bunn has a
> flat bottomed filter. I retrofitted it with a #6 Melitta filter, which
> interestingly, fit perfectly on top of the Bunn carafe, and the coffee
> improved significantly.


Thanks very much.



> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
> news:gg5pd3d313428nb4phmve03dtgr97t79jf@4ax.com...
> > Several years ago, someone told me that drip coffee makers that use
> > the flat-bottomed "Mr. Coffee" type filters were superior to those
> > that use cone-shaped filters.
> >
> > Is that true?
> >
> > --
> > Ken Blake
> > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
>

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup