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Date: 02 Oct 2006 09:52:17
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Coffee choice for espresso
Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the time, or
do you change frequently? Since each different choice of coffee often means
changing the grind/tamp ritual, it would be more practical to stay with one
choice. I find that I waste more coffee changing about because of this
necessary experimentation. However, I do enjoy the variety of flavors that
it produces.






 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 19:09:58
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso

Stewart wrote:
> Flasherly wrote:
>
> > In a conventional, or Italian sense espresso is blended with perhaps at
> > least three choice selections.
> Hersey or Nestle
> > Guatamalan concoctions I prepare
>
> mmm sounds like a charbucks high fat, $ drink

Nope - roundabout mulling over somebody awhile back ragging on acidic
factors light roasts. Did a double-taste and he's right, although I'd
qualify the green as acidic to tongue-taste moreso than stomach
(settles nicely, that). Next batch, I'll spend a nickel or two more
(at the cheapest bean origin website in existence) for some of their
medium to undercharred vagaries. $4US lb., excluding Hawaiian, and
even an itemized "poorman's blend".



 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 18:36:03
From: Stewart
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso


> Harry Moos wrote:
> > Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the time, or
> > do you change frequently?

Flasherly wrote:

> In a conventional, or Italian sense espresso is blended with perhaps at
> least three choice selections.
Hersey or Nestle
> Guatamalan concoctions I prepare



mmm sounds like a charbucks high fat, $ drink


Stewart



 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 18:07:24
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso

Harry Moos wrote:
> Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the time, or
> do you change frequently? Since each different choice of coffee often means
> changing the grind/tamp ritual, it would be more practical to stay with one
> choice. I find that I waste more coffee changing about because of this
> necessary experimentation.

In a conventional, or Italian sense espresso is blended with perhaps at
least three choice selections. But, accounting some discrepancy
between Northern and Southern Mediterranian climes, such selections
will possess a strong likelihood within regional consistency, so to
regard for any incessant "fiddling about" as what may come reasonably
to be expected meddlesome and apart from an ennui of sanctioned
practises. A potentional analogy hence follows: As would be to
serving a glass of Hersey or Nestle tradeked chocolate milk, were
root of carob indeed proffered for chocolate's namesake to Cronus at
the gates of Chaos (Cronus has particularly abhorrent habits and eats
his children when displeased).

Personally, I should consider espresso as properly not within
standards, such as I understand slightly greenly-tinted, acidic
Guatamalan concoctions I prepare, noted characteristically of volcanic
extraction. Such especially succinct flavours are given, if at all, to
be the diminutive of as much as a quarter allowance within what overall
affecters are apt to construe a proper espresso blend from odds
competent roasts qualify. Blending, as such, I may, or then again not,
ever come to understanding, and rather expect to be preoccupied by an
indigeneous quality culivations singularly form for awhile or more.



  
Date: 03 Oct 2006 01:48:25
From: Alan
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso

"Flasherly" wrote
> In a conventional, or Italian sense espresso is blended with perhaps at
> least three choice selections. But, accounting some discrepancy
> between Northern and Southern Mediterranian climes, such selections
> will possess a strong likelihood within regional consistency, so to
> regard for any incessant "fiddling about" as what may come reasonably
> to be expected meddlesome and apart from an ennui of sanctioned
> practises. A potentional analogy hence follows: As would be to
> serving a glass of Hersey or Nestle tradeked chocolate milk, were
> root of carob indeed proffered for chocolate's namesake to Cronus at
> the gates of Chaos (Cronus has particularly abhorrent habits and eats
> his children when displeased).
>
> Personally, I should consider espresso as properly not within
> standards, such as I understand slightly greenly-tinted, acidic
> Guatamalan concoctions I prepare, noted characteristically of volcanic
> extraction. Such especially succinct flavours are given, if at all, to
> be the diminutive of as much as a quarter allowance within what overall
> affecters are apt to construe a proper espresso blend from odds
> competent roasts qualify. Blending, as such, I may, or then again not,
> ever come to understanding, and rather expect to be preoccupied by an
> indigeneous quality culivations singularly form for awhile or more.

Let me guess --- Flasherley's not a native English speaker?




   
Date: 03 Oct 2006 06:35:15
From: Ian Smith
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso
On Tue, 03 Oct, Alan <in_flagrante@hotmail.com > wrote:
>
> "Flasherly" wrote

The usual sort of stuff.

> Let me guess --- Flasherley's not a native English speaker?

Consensus last time seemed to be that he thinks it's clever. If you
push, he'll be along to tell you how he ks essay papers by phd
students in creative english, or something.

regards, Ian SMith
--


    
Date: 03 Oct 2006 10:56:21
From: Alan
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso

"Ian Smith" <ian@astounding.org.uk > wrote in message
news:slrnei4153.933.ian@acheron.smithnet...
> On Tue, 03 Oct, Alan <in_flagrante@hotmail.com> wrote:
>>
>> "Flasherly" wrote
>
> The usual sort of stuff.
>
>> Let me guess --- Flasherley's not a native English speaker?
>
> Consensus last time seemed to be that he thinks it's clever. If you
> push, he'll be along to tell you how he ks essay papers by phd
> students in creative english, or something.
>
> regards, Ian SMith

I think his trick is to subject a poorly written Albanian original to a
machine translation into English . . .

--- Alan




 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 19:13:40
From: hermit
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso

I stick with two varieties for the most part - Sweetias Monkey
Blend and Dolce from Vivace. I recently tried some Zambian and it was
very tasty. I would like to know what other varieties folks use when
their specific blend runs out. I think half the fun and challenge of
espresso is adjusting grind - tamp should remain the same.

Rich

On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 09:52:17 -0500, "Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net >
wrote:

>Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the time, or
>do you change frequently? Since each different choice of coffee often means
>changing the grind/tamp ritual, it would be more practical to stay with one
>choice. I find that I waste more coffee changing about because of this
>necessary experimentation. However, I do enjoy the variety of flavors that
>it produces.
>


 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 18:47:01
From: Ian Smith
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso
On Mon, 2 Oct 2006, Harry Moos <harrym@ruraltel.net > wrote:

> Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the
> time, or do you change frequently?

About 80% of my consumption is nearly teh same. I like the
straightforward cleanish taste of columbian for my day-to-day coffee,
so take my suppliers advice of what's the current good columbian he
has. I occasionally roast it a bit darker than usual on a whim.

About 20% of my consumption is something different - each time I
purchase a couple of big bags of my 'staple', I buy a small bag or two
of something different just to try out. As you note, if you buy a
little of something it can take a highish proportion of your purchase
to get everything tuned - and I'd add not only teh mechanics of grind,
tamp, tenperature etc., but also the mouth. I'd probably be rubbish
at cupping - it takes me a few cups to get round to appreciating a
particular blend or bean, and only rarely do I think 'wow, great
coffee' at first taste (even when it seems mechanically to have been
teh right grind, tamp, temp, pour etc).

regards, Ian SMith
--


  
Date: 02 Oct 2006 22:21:55
From: Ken Wilson
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso
"Ian Smith"
>
>> Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the
>> time, or do you change frequently?
>
> About 80% of my consumption is nearly teh same. I like the
> straightforward cleanish taste of columbian for my day-to-day coffee,
> so take my suppliers advice of what's the current good columbian he
> has. I occasionally roast it a bit darker than usual on a whim.
>
> About 20% of my consumption is something different - each time I
> purchase a couple of big bags of my 'staple', I buy a small bag or two
> of something different just to try out. As you note, if you buy a
> little of something it can take a highish proportion of your purchase
> to get everything tuned - and I'd add not only teh mechanics of grind,
> tamp, tenperature etc., but also the mouth. I'd probably be rubbish
> at cupping - it takes me a few cups to get round to appreciating a
> particular blend or bean, and only rarely do I think 'wow, great
> coffee' at first taste (even when it seems mechanically to have been
> teh right grind, tamp, temp, pour etc).

Same as him - but i can type "the" but not "becuase".

and i have moved from colombian (the coffee coffee) to peru at work
(mildish, background coffee ) and PNG at home (gutsy waker upperer)



>
> regards, Ian SMith
> --
>


 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 18:20:14
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Coffee choice for espresso
On Mon, 2 Oct 2006 09:52:17 -0500, "Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net >
wrote:

>Do most of you use the same variety/blend for espresso most of the time, or
>do you change frequently? Since each different choice of coffee often means
>changing the grind/tamp ritual, it would be more practical to stay with one
>choice. I find that I waste more coffee changing about because of this
>necessary experimentation. However, I do enjoy the variety of flavors that
>it produces.

I rotate through 6 "regular" favorites with less frequent visits to
other blends I like. When I try something new, I wait until I have
settled on what I think is its best grind and temperature on my home
setup and record it on my computer. The next time I buy that blend, I
look it up, and if I don't hit the sweet spot immediately, I usually
do within two or three shots. Sometimes I decide I was wrong in my
initial conclusion (or the roaster changes the blend), and I change my
notes.

This saves me a lot of frustration (and wasted coffee). I would get
bored very quickly, if I drank the same one or two blends all the
time.

shall