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Date: 24 Dec 2006 17:42:59
From:
Subject: Coffee tastes green: iRoast
Hi all

Just wondering if anyone else has come across this issue with the
iRoast. No matter how I roast I get a bitter green tasting coffee,
even if I roast well into the 2nd crack. The interesting thing is that
I had to get a replacement chaff lid, and it didn't fit quite right.
More air circulated through and the temp was significantly lower,
although I did not check the number. With this scenario I got great
tasting coffee. Once in awhile a baked batch, but not too often.

So what's the problem, you might ask? This iRoast went kablooey and I
purchased a new iRoast2. Now I am back to the original issue with
green tasting coffee. The taste does go away a bit (but not
completely) after resting, but I'm not always that proactive with my
roasting.

Any advice? What am I doing wrong, if anything, and what can I try
differently? I roast anywhere from 138 to 146 grams per batch on the
preset 2 with the iRoast2.

Thanks
Ruth





 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 18:47:49
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee tastes green: iRoast

wootiegirl@gmail.com wrote:
> Thanks everyone for the input. I am going to roast tonight and will
> post results in a few days. The coffee finishes as sharply "bitter,"
> almost chemical. It doesn't taste stalled or baked - it is more
> tolerable than that. I'm familiar enough with identifying a stalled
> roast, even by the smell of the roasted beans. I think it's what one
> poster said as the outside roasting while the inside does not, but it
> seems that if a roast progresses well into the 2nd crack this taste
> would be eliminated and it isn't. I even wondered if it was my coffee
> maker until I started getting the good batches with the modified iRoast
> before it crashed.


I have that with a few varietals of beans. Lately, my Ethiopian
Yirgacheffe has been one of them. A bitterness that's hard to roast
out. I've gone with a gentle ramp to the last stage with a long finish
at about 420F and 450F to get the fold or inside of the bean close to
the same colour as the outside and still there's a touch of bitterness.
It's less with a darker roast but it's still there. It might be the
bean. Which beans are you getting bitterness from?



 
Date: 26 Dec 2006 15:00:40
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee tastes green: iRoast
Thanks everyone for the input. I am going to roast tonight and will
post results in a few days. The coffee finishes as sharply "bitter,"
almost chemical. It doesn't taste stalled or baked - it is more
tolerable than that. I'm familiar enough with identifying a stalled
roast, even by the smell of the roasted beans. I think it's what one
poster said as the outside roasting while the inside does not, but it
seems that if a roast progresses well into the 2nd crack this taste
would be eliminated and it isn't. I even wondered if it was my coffee
maker until I started getting the good batches with the modified iRoast
before it crashed.

mrgnomer@hotmail.com wrote:
> By tasting green do you mean like straw or under roasted? What's the
> level of the roast? Light, medium, dark?
>
> You can get straw tasting roasts by stalling the roast. The temp in
> the bean should be going up consistently to get it to fully crack. If
> it levels off for too long before the end of a full 1st crack you bake
> it rather than roast it and it ends up tasting a lot like straw.
>
> A fluid bed is sensitive to voltage as well. I've read about issues
> with drop in voltage supply affecting the output of the heating element
> which could also lead to under roasting/stalling. If you're under
> roasting checking the voltage output of your plug might help find the
> cause.
>
> Roasting in smaller batches could help and finishing higher. I don't
> have a profile with my iRoast2 that doesn't finish lower than 425F and
> that's for light roasts. Medium roasts I finish at 450F.



 
Date: 25 Dec 2006 18:14:24
From:
Subject: Re: Coffee tastes green: iRoast
By tasting green do you mean like straw or under roasted? What's the
level of the roast? Light, medium, dark?

You can get straw tasting roasts by stalling the roast. The temp in
the bean should be going up consistently to get it to fully crack. If
it levels off for too long before the end of a full 1st crack you bake
it rather than roast it and it ends up tasting a lot like straw.

A fluid bed is sensitive to voltage as well. I've read about issues
with drop in voltage supply affecting the output of the heating element
which could also lead to under roasting/stalling. If you're under
roasting checking the voltage output of your plug might help find the
cause.

Roasting in smaller batches could help and finishing higher. I don't
have a profile with my iRoast2 that doesn't finish lower than 425F and
that's for light roasts. Medium roasts I finish at 450F.