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Date: 13 Apr 2007 18:14:09
From: bernie
Subject: Coffee to Iraq Questions
One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq in
June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has become
a friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience of
the best way to send coffee to this guy. Actually, I'd be sending it to
the unit I suppose. I don't know how they do it now, but when I was in
you didn't send anything like coffee to troops as the mess hall wouldn't
accomodate you. Anybody know how it works these days? Has anybody heard
of sending coffee to a specific unit and how best to get it done? He
said he had no idea since he didn't even know where they were headed.
Thanks.
Bernie (totally bummed with this news)




 
Date: 15 Apr 2007 13:07:57
From: JoeP
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
On Apr 13, 6:40 pm, "Craig Andrews" <alt.cof...@deletethis.rogers.com >
wrote:
> "Marshall" <mrf...@ihatespamearthlink.net> wrote in message
>
> news:gj9023t7l55tjg6remmmmjo533oj9ujkab@4ax.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > On 13 Apr 2007 17:29:46 -0700, "JoeP" <j...@internet-realty.com> wrote:
>
> >>We organized a similar program (Adopt a soldier) at
> >>www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
> >>It's pretty easy you can use normal USPS mail, I prefer flat rate
> >>priority boxes. You can fir 4-5 lbs roasted coffee in them. You will
> >>need to fill out a special form because its most likely a military FPO
> >>address. Its similar to a customs form. But try to stay in contact
> >>with him or his family, if you know his unit you can call the base and
> >>let them know you have a care package to send him. They will usually
> >>give you the Address for those types of packages, but it's much easier
> >>if you have his email address or if his family is in contact with him,
> >>so you can just use USPS.
>
> >>I hope it works out, the troops really like getting coffee,
>
> >>Joe
> >>www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
> >>"freinds getting together splitting bags of coffee"
>
> > At last year's SCAA Conference in Charlotte there was a military
> > contingent that had been trained by the Barista Guild and supplied in
> > Iraq by SCAA. They called their cafe "Black Java" and got a standing
> > ovation from the crowd.
>
> > Marshall
>
> Thanks Joe & Marshall, wait.., I meant, GIJoe! {;-D
> As always & ever vigilant, & on Guard For Thee,
> Cheers,
> Craigo.- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

hahahha......yeah Craig I never heard that growing up. Yo! Joe! :-D

Joe
www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
"freinds getting together splitting bags of coffee"



 
Date: 15 Apr 2007 01:22:13
From: CSME9
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions

"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:46201cc3$1@nntp.zianet.com...
> One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq in
> June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has become
> a friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience of
> the best way to send coffee to this guy. Actually, I'd be sending it to
> the unit I suppose. I don't know how they do it now, but when I was in
> you didn't send anything like coffee to troops as the mess hall wouldn't
> accomodate you. Anybody know how it works these days? Has anybody heard
> of sending coffee to a specific unit and how best to get it done? He
> said he had no idea since he didn't even know where they were headed.
> Thanks.
> Bernie (totally bummed with this news)

Bernie,

Having served 3 combat tours in Iraq myself, i recommend to keep it simple
and small. A velox 2-4 cup electric espresso brewer will work great and is
only 7 inches tall 3 3/8 diameter. No doubt whole beans are better requires
more equipment and space but in this case you may want to send ground coffee
(hard to say that word) . Wait for friend to arrive at final unit
destination and send you his address. USPS is best way to send to the APO,
at the APO it is transported via military or civilian contracted fleet to
Iraq.

Usually arrives within 8-12 day's from mailing date, trust me he will really
appreciate the coffee.

Will




 
Date: 14 Apr 2007 16:33:29
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
On Apr 14, 6:27 pm, "Robert Harmon" <r_h_har...@hotmail.com > wrote:
>
> I'm still looking for the smallest serviceable grinder. Anyone have
> suggestions? He's assigned to a armored division this rotation but is
> in supply, so he'll be on post most of the time. Room is less of a
> problem than electricity & he's got a small 120 v 60Hz generator as a
> backup.
>

Mine was new $30 not long ago. KVX1 and times change. So do prices.
Offhand I'd flip it for $27 (including shipping) and it's as new, or
the same condition/ship Capresso model 560.01 $60 (the latter's lower
compartment is modified into a doser chute, which can be retrofitted
back). On a layout I'd do both together for $80 (including shipping)
-- and start researching for a replacement infinately adjustable,
(maybe if 50+ stops), with an open PF doser chute.

Beats taking apart the Capresso to see if it can be filed for for its
last two finest adjustments stops, opening an infinite range between,
where I find it most useful. Which could turn into more work than
just going after the "golden" grinder.

Problem's I'm not setup for this, though, selling stuff across the
internet. Just suggestions on items/pricing for a couple not-the-
greatest-grinders ever marketed. Krup's flatplate burrs and Infinity
is entry conical (Infinity being among the ranks of serviceable
according to some).

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B000EVLUYU/ref=sr_1_olp_6/002-8850701-8976849?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1176591500&sr=1-6

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_ss_k/102-5520803-4921709?url=search-alias%3Dgarden&field-keywords=capresso+grinder&Go.x=0&Go.y=0&Go=Go



 
Date: 14 Apr 2007 15:27:33
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
Just remembered an earlier post about Marshall's having the 10 cup
Bialetti Venus S/S moka pot for $20. I went in, they had one left, &
now it & the air popper are going into the kid's goodies bag.

I'm still looking for the smallest serviceable grinder. Anyone have
suggestions? He's assigned to a armored division this rotation but is
in supply, so he'll be on post most of the time. Room is less of a
problem than electricity & he's got a small 120 v 60Hz generator as a
backup.

Robert


On Apr 13, 9:31 pm, "Robert Harmon" <r_h_har...@Zhotmail.com > wrote:
> A young man I've been very fond of since his birth was rotated home about
> six months ago. He's just received official notification that his unit is
> rotating back to Iraq in a couple of months. Everyone is putting together
> care packages for him & I was thinking of green beans, small roaster &
> espresso machine. Because even the smallest pump machines are too big for
> his space allotment I'm considering a moka pot and air popper & a regular
> shipment of SM's beans. Does anyone have an opinion about the stove top vs.
> electric moka pots based on repetitive use by multiple people (young 1st
> Lt's are thought more highly of if they can offer fresh coffee to the CO &
> Top)? If you're going to advise against the moka pot then come up with a
> valid alternative.
> --
> Robert (Been there, done that, got the T-shirt; I know how good it feels to
> have a piece of home!) Harmonwww.tinyurl.com/mb4uj- My coffee pageswww.tinyurl.com/2tnv87- Guidelines for newbies.www.tinyurl.com/37gwfr- I may have stuff available for sale here.
>
> "bernie" <bdig...@zianet.com> wrote in message
>
> news:46201cc3$1@nntp.zianet.com...
>
> > One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq in
> > June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has become a
> > friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience of the
> > best way to send coffee to this guy. Actually, I'd be sending it to the
> > unit I suppose. I don't know how they do it now, but when I was in you
> > didn't send anything like coffee to troops as the mess hall wouldn't
> > accomodate you. Anybody know how it works these days? Has anybody heard of
> > sending coffee to a specific unit and how best to get it done? He said he
> > had no idea since he didn't even know where they were headed. Thanks.
> > Bernie (totally bummed with this news)




 
Date: 14 Apr 2007 08:01:12
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
On Apr 13, 10:31 pm, "Robert Harmon" <r_h_har...@Zhotmail.com > wrote:
> A young man I've been very fond of since his birth was rotated home about
> six months ago. He's just received official notification that his unit is
> rotating back to Iraq in a couple of months. Everyone is putting together
> care packages for him & I was thinking of green beans, small roaster &
> espresso machine. Because even the smallest pump machines are too big for
> his space allotment I'm considering a moka pot and air popper & a regular
> shipment of SM's beans. Does anyone have an opinion about the stove top vs.
> electric moka pots based on repetitive use by multiple people (young 1st
> Lt's are thought more highly of if they can offer fresh coffee to the CO &
> Top)? If you're going to advise against the moka pot then come up with a
> valid alternative.

Considerate, but its business not pleasure towing the line. He might
turn around and store a "works" elsewhere if the makeup's too
elaborate. Guys carrying a bunch of "weird crap" can be negatively
perceived - depending on position and leeway given. Keep it simple.
No popper. Keep the roasted beans shipped on the lighter side of
poundage weight. Make up for it with a better non-electric mokapot.
Not bright colors nor if possible shinny (dull metal, and it might be
mistaken for camaflagged vintage percolator). At European 2 oz.
incremements, make that the biggest individual unit available. Get a
quality thermos to keep it hot. (A small toothbrush-sized battery
milk frother in case he gets lucky and catches a goat). Three
civilian accruements, he just might slide . . . enlisted standpoint
is, what doesn't blend into a picklejar at a moment's notice, may
stand out for a boot-in-arse sequence of chained commands.



 
Date: 14 Apr 2007 12:33:41
From: The Other Funk
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
Finding the keyboard operational
bernie entered:

> One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq
> in June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has
> become a friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any
> experience of the best way to send coffee to this guy. Actually, I'd
> be sending it to the unit I suppose. I don't know how they do it now,
> but when I was in you didn't send anything like coffee to troops as
> the mess hall wouldn't accomodate you. Anybody know how it works
> these days? Has anybody heard of sending coffee to a specific unit
> and how best to get it done? He said he had no idea since he didn't
> even know where they were headed. Thanks.
> Bernie (totally bummed with this news)
We haven't done it yet but there is a project called " anysoldier.com" (or
sailor/airman/marine/ coastguardsman) for sending packages to troops.
As stated on the site;
All APO/FPO ZIP Codes have a "B" restriction which states that the custom
form 2976-A is required for all mail weighing 16 ounces or more. In
addition, mailers must properly complete required customs documentation when
mailing any potentially dutiable mail addressed to an APO/FPO regardless of
weight.
God speed to your customer.
Bob


--
--
Coffee worth staying up for - NY Times
www.moondoggiecoffee.com



 
Date: 14 Apr 2007 02:47:20
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
On Fri, 13 Apr 2007 18:14:09 -0600, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote:

> One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq in
>June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has become
>a friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience of
>the best way to send coffee to this guy. Actually, I'd be sending it to
>the unit I suppose. I don't know how they do it now, but when I was in
>you didn't send anything like coffee to troops as the mess hall wouldn't
>accomodate you. Anybody know how it works these days? Has anybody heard
>of sending coffee to a specific unit and how best to get it done? He
>said he had no idea since he didn't even know where they were headed.

send it to his APO address. piece of cake.

there are several units out there which have cafes/coffeebars set up.
the one we supplied for awhile was with the illinois battalion support
detachment (or something like that); they were ING from springfield.


 
Date: 14 Apr 2007 02:31:21
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
A young man I've been very fond of since his birth was rotated home about
six months ago. He's just received official notification that his unit is
rotating back to Iraq in a couple of months. Everyone is putting together
care packages for him & I was thinking of green beans, small roaster &
espresso machine. Because even the smallest pump machines are too big for
his space allotment I'm considering a moka pot and air popper & a regular
shipment of SM's beans. Does anyone have an opinion about the stove top vs.
electric moka pots based on repetitive use by multiple people (young 1st
Lt's are thought more highly of if they can offer fresh coffee to the CO &
Top)? If you're going to advise against the moka pot then come up with a
valid alternative.
--
Robert (Been there, done that, got the T-shirt; I know how good it feels to
have a piece of home!) Harmon
www.tinyurl.com/mb4uj - My coffee pages
www.tinyurl.com/2tnv87 - Guidelines for newbies.
www.tinyurl.com/37gwfr - I may have stuff available for sale here.

"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:46201cc3$1@nntp.zianet.com...
> One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq in
> June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has become a
> friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience of the
> best way to send coffee to this guy. Actually, I'd be sending it to the
> unit I suppose. I don't know how they do it now, but when I was in you
> didn't send anything like coffee to troops as the mess hall wouldn't
> accomodate you. Anybody know how it works these days? Has anybody heard of
> sending coffee to a specific unit and how best to get it done? He said he
> had no idea since he didn't even know where they were headed. Thanks.
> Bernie (totally bummed with this news)




  
Date: 14 Apr 2007 11:08:06
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com > wrote:

>A young man I've been very fond of since his birth was rotated home about
>six months ago. He's just received official notification that his unit is
>rotating back to Iraq in a couple of months. Everyone is putting together
>care packages for him & I was thinking of green beans, small roaster &
>espresso machine.
>
Give him an AeroPress and send regular shipments of roasted coffee.
Easy to use, easy to pack, fast, only needs a source of hot water, and
makes a great cup of coffee.

Randy "Keep it stupid, Simple.. or something like that" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com




 
Date: 13 Apr 2007 22:27:26
From: Steve Ackman
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
In <46201cc3$1@nntp.zianet.com >, on Fri, 13 Apr 2007 18:14:09 -0600,
bernie wrote:
> One of our regular customers is being mobilized to be sent to Iraq in
> June. He is a police officer here and we see him often and he has become
> a friend to the staff. I'm wondering if anybody has any experience of
> the best way to send coffee to this guy.

USPS Priority. I don't recall whether flat rate
works or not... we always sent more at a time than
would fit in a flat rate box.

> Actually, I'd be sending it to the unit I suppose.

I'm pretty sure you need an actual person to ship it
to; no shipping to "the unit" allowed.

> I don't know how they do it now, but when I was in
> you didn't send anything like coffee to troops as the mess hall wouldn't
> accomodate you. Anybody know how it works these days? Has anybody heard
> of sending coffee to a specific unit and how best to get it done? He
> said he had no idea since he didn't even know where they were headed.

As soon as he gets there, have him e-mail you his
address.


 
Date: 13 Apr 2007 17:29:46
From: JoeP
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
We organized a similar program (Adopt a soldier) at www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
It's pretty easy you can use normal USPS mail, I prefer flat rate
priority boxes. You can fir 4-5 lbs roasted coffee in them. You will
need to fill out a special form because its most likely a military FPO
address. Its similar to a customs form. But try to stay in contact
with him or his family, if you know his unit you can call the base and
let them know you have a care package to send him. They will usually
give you the Address for those types of packages, but it's much easier
if you have his email address or if his family is in contact with him,
so you can just use USPS.


I hope it works out, the troops really like getting coffee,

Joe
www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
"freinds getting together splitting bags of coffee"




  
Date: 14 Apr 2007 01:02:28
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions
On 13 Apr 2007 17:29:46 -0700, "JoeP" <joe@internet-realty.com > wrote:

>We organized a similar program (Adopt a soldier) at www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
>It's pretty easy you can use normal USPS mail, I prefer flat rate
>priority boxes. You can fir 4-5 lbs roasted coffee in them. You will
>need to fill out a special form because its most likely a military FPO
>address. Its similar to a customs form. But try to stay in contact
>with him or his family, if you know his unit you can call the base and
>let them know you have a care package to send him. They will usually
>give you the Address for those types of packages, but it's much easier
>if you have his email address or if his family is in contact with him,
>so you can just use USPS.
>
>
>I hope it works out, the troops really like getting coffee,
>
>Joe
>www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
>"freinds getting together splitting bags of coffee"

At last year's SCAA Conference in Charlotte there was a military
contingent that had been trained by the Barista Guild and supplied in
Iraq by SCAA. They called their cafe "Black Java" and got a standing
ovation from the crowd.

Marshall


   
Date: 13 Apr 2007 21:40:50
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: Coffee to Iraq Questions

"Marshall" <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote in message
news:gj9023t7l55tjg6remmmmjo533oj9ujkab@4ax.com...
> On 13 Apr 2007 17:29:46 -0700, "JoeP" <joe@internet-realty.com> wrote:
>
>>We organized a similar program (Adopt a soldier) at
>>www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
>>It's pretty easy you can use normal USPS mail, I prefer flat rate
>>priority boxes. You can fir 4-5 lbs roasted coffee in them. You will
>>need to fill out a special form because its most likely a military FPO
>>address. Its similar to a customs form. But try to stay in contact
>>with him or his family, if you know his unit you can call the base and
>>let them know you have a care package to send him. They will usually
>>give you the Address for those types of packages, but it's much easier
>>if you have his email address or if his family is in contact with him,
>>so you can just use USPS.
>>
>>
>>I hope it works out, the troops really like getting coffee,
>>
>>Joe
>>www.greencoffeebuyingclub.com
>>"freinds getting together splitting bags of coffee"
>
> At last year's SCAA Conference in Charlotte there was a military
> contingent that had been trained by the Barista Guild and supplied in
> Iraq by SCAA. They called their cafe "Black Java" and got a standing
> ovation from the crowd.
>
> Marshall

Thanks Joe & Marshall, wait.., I meant, GIJoe! {;-D
As always & ever vigilant, & on Guard For Thee,
Cheers,
Craigo.