coffee-forum.net
Promoting coffee discussion.

Main
Date: 15 Aug 2007 10:37:38
From: Lucygrace
Subject: Definition of Superauto
Hi guys,
I'm still in my learning phase here, so could someone kindly explain to
me the definition of a superauto machine vs. a traditional machine?
I'd really appreciate it. Oh and thanks for all the knowledge I've
already picked up while reading this newsgroup.

I'm working in a coffee shop using a Nuevo Simonelli and espresso
roasted by Cafe D'Arte, which has a wonderfully pleasant chocolate
undertone to it.

Thanks,
LG





 
Date: 20 Aug 2007 12:28:31
From: lockjaw
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
in the espresso machine
> repair shop. But your 6 year run with constant use is pretty good. Of
> course, your claim has no credibility w/o a make and model number and
> some research to see if your experience is more than a fluke.
>
> > Have a good day.
>
> Why thank you! You do the same!
>
> R "time for some moka pot coffee" TF

I fix supers, hundreds of 'em and with reasonable care they can go 6
years or more. Or they can be ruined in 3 months -- just like any
machine. and FWIW, I do not sell supers, OK?

and BTW, the boneyard is not an indicator of quality. how many
machines came in and went OUT of that shop repaired?


dave
877 286 2833



 
Date: 20 Aug 2007 01:23:48
From: lockjaw
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto


This ng is the home of the super-auto haters. ( supers are not my
thing but they can do a very good job)

FWIW, Owning one and being happy w/ it is no sin!

good for you -- and enjoy!

Dave
www.hitechespresso.com



 
Date: 15 Aug 2007 21:08:43
From: lockjaw
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto

> LG

A superauto makes espresso or whatever with the push of one button.

Many would say this is NOT the best way! -- due to the lack of
control.

Dave
Saeco / Gaggia service center SE

www.hitechespresso.com



  
Date: 15 Aug 2007 22:37:21
From: Lucygrace
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
lockjaw wrote:
>> LG
>
> A superauto makes espresso or whatever with the push of one button.
>
> Many would say this is NOT the best way! -- due to the lack of
> control.
>
> Dave
> Saeco / Gaggia service center SE
>
> www.hitechespresso.com
>
Thanks guys! Thinking this is not the way I want to go when I can
finally afford a decent machine.

LG <--- thinks tamping is fun :)



 
Date: 15 Aug 2007 12:29:23
From: Ogre
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
Lucygrace wrote:
> Hi guys,
> I'm still in my learning phase here, so could someone kindly explain to
> me the definition of a superauto machine vs. a traditional machine?
> I'd really appreciate it. Oh and thanks for all the knowledge I've
> already picked up while reading this newsgroup.
>
> I'm working in a coffee shop using a Nuevo Simonelli and espresso
> roasted by Cafe D'Arte, which has a wonderfully pleasant chocolate
> undertone to it.

One button to go from beans and water to espresso. I love my superauto.
I don't have the time nor the patience to learn to pull a god shot
from a fancy Italian marvel of coffee engineering. Besides, my
superauto produces such good shots that I don't feel I'm missing anything.

My morning routine is this:

1. Alarm goes off, hit snooze.
2. Repeat step one 1 a half dozen times.
3. Go into kitchen and turn on superauto.
4. Go to restroom while superauto warms up.
5. Press "flush" button on superauto to do a quick cleaning.
6. Feed cats while machine flushes.
7. Put cup under spout and press "shot" button.

Warm up time is about one minute. Flush time is about 15 seconds.
These two steps are only required when turning the machine on. After
that, it's about 30 seconds to make a shot unless it needs more beans,
water, or needs to have the grounds receptacle dumped. The quality of
the beans makes all the difference in the world.

I have a Jura-Capresso E8 and am very happy with the machine.

--
Ogre


  
Date: 15 Aug 2007 22:57:32
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
When I stumbled upon alt.coffee some number of years ago I thought I
wanted a superauto. After researching the issue some I determined that
a superauto would not give me the kind of control I wanted. Moreover,
the superautos are very complicated and the home machines are made of
plastic with lots of plastic gears and low production microelectronics.
So I ended up with an all metal Silvia and later upgraded to an all
metal Andreja. Not trouble free but maintenance can be performed by
mere mortals with simple hand tools. I recall a visit to am espresso
machine repair shop that was littered with the disassembled carcasses of
consumer level superautos. I don't know what brands, I don't know what
models, but it did not look promising that those machines would ever be
making espresso again.

R "and both of my cars have clutch pedals" TF

Ogre wrote:
> Lucygrace wrote:
>> Hi guys,
>> I'm still in my learning phase here, so could someone kindly explain
>> to me the definition of a superauto machine vs. a traditional machine?
>> I'd really appreciate it. Oh and thanks for all the knowledge I've
>> already picked up while reading this newsgroup.
>>
>> I'm working in a coffee shop using a Nuevo Simonelli and espresso
>> roasted by Cafe D'Arte, which has a wonderfully pleasant chocolate
>> undertone to it.
>
> One button to go from beans and water to espresso. I love my superauto.
> I don't have the time nor the patience to learn to pull a god shot from
> a fancy Italian marvel of coffee engineering. Besides, my superauto
> produces such good shots that I don't feel I'm missing anything.
>
> My morning routine is this:
>
> 1. Alarm goes off, hit snooze.
> 2. Repeat step one 1 a half dozen times.
> 3. Go into kitchen and turn on superauto.
> 4. Go to restroom while superauto warms up.
> 5. Press "flush" button on superauto to do a quick cleaning.
> 6. Feed cats while machine flushes.
> 7. Put cup under spout and press "shot" button.
>
> Warm up time is about one minute. Flush time is about 15 seconds. These
> two steps are only required when turning the machine on. After that,
> it's about 30 seconds to make a shot unless it needs more beans, water,
> or needs to have the grounds receptacle dumped. The quality of the
> beans makes all the difference in the world.
>
> I have a Jura-Capresso E8 and am very happy with the machine.
>


   
Date: 17 Aug 2007 12:47:01
From: S.D.
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 22:57:32 -0400, Moka Java wrote:

> Moreover, the super autos are very complicated and the home machines are mad

Let me clarify - I am not a die hard coffee roasting hobbyist. Even
though I am aware of what's involved with roasting, being a purist or
coffee snob never interested me (not intended at the reader). Aside
from being a home gourmet cook; my hobby's are out doors.

That said, I have to disagree with your assessment and assumption of
super autos, their parts, and such. I've owned one for over six years
now and originally spent $1000 for it. It's used every day, morning and
evening providing me multiple quality shots, and provides guests a
number of premium coffee drinks, just requiring a bit more attention.

Only ONE problem in SIX YEAR - sent the machine in - they immediately
sent me a temp replacement until my machine was evaluated. Once the
selling vendor deemed decided the part wasn't worth replacement, they
sent me a new MACHINE, plus return shipping for their temp machine; all
without question.
Oh, it was purchased from an online vendor. Futhermore, since my
purchase some friends have purchased similar machines; with one
purchasing the same machine - NO problems for three years.

--
SD:)
"Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them.(A.E.)"
My disclaimer: I can say, but can't make you see...(S.D.)


    
Date: 18 Aug 2007 08:19:16
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
That's great, glad you like your results and have had good service from
your machine. Any reason you didn't mention the make and model of that
beauty?

The memory of the superauto graveyard still haunts me. I wake up nights
. . .

R "the horror, the horror!" TF

S.D. wrote:
> On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 22:57:32 -0400, Moka Java wrote:
>
>> Moreover, the super autos are very complicated and the home machines are mad
>
> Let me clarify - I am not a die hard coffee roasting hobbyist. Even
> though I am aware of what's involved with roasting, being a purist or
> coffee snob never interested me (not intended at the reader). Aside
> from being a home gourmet cook; my hobby's are out doors.
>
> That said, I have to disagree with your assessment and assumption of
> super autos, their parts, and such. I've owned one for over six years
> now and originally spent $1000 for it. It's used every day, morning and
> evening providing me multiple quality shots, and provides guests a
> number of premium coffee drinks, just requiring a bit more attention.
>
> Only ONE problem in SIX YEAR - sent the machine in - they immediately
> sent me a temp replacement until my machine was evaluated. Once the
> selling vendor deemed decided the part wasn't worth replacement, they
> sent me a new MACHINE, plus return shipping for their temp machine; all
> without question.
> Oh, it was purchased from an online vendor. Futhermore, since my
> purchase some friends have purchased similar machines; with one
> purchasing the same machine - NO problems for three years.
>


     
Date: 19 Aug 2007 18:09:40
From: S.D.
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 08:19:16 -0400, Moka Java wrote:

> Any reason you didn't mention the make and model of that
> beauty?

Not into promoting my choices in NG's. If the OP is interested, I have
no problem sharing. Suffice to say, I know 4 buyers/users aside from
myself; all are happy. I even know a two that have spent considerably
more on custom home superautos installs, and they're happy; course those
are under two year old purchases.

Have a good day.
--
SD:)
"Intellectuals solve problems; geniuses prevent them.(A.E.)"
My disclaimer: I can say, but can't make you see...(S.D.)


      
Date: 20 Aug 2007 06:50:39
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
S.D. wrote:
> On Sat, 18 Aug 2007 08:19:16 -0400, Moka Java wrote:
>
>> Any reason you didn't mention the make and model of that
>> beauty?
>
> Not into promoting my choices in NG's. If the OP is interested, I have
> no problem sharing.

Huh? Did you read the original post and her later comment? The OP is a
professional barrista who said in a later post that she likes tamping.

Suffice to say, I know 4 buyers/users aside from
> myself; all are happy. I even know a two that have spent considerably
> more on custom home superautos installs, and they're happy; course those
> are under two year old purchases.
>

I don't hate superatuos, just not my choice. They're great if you or a
spouse don't want to deal with espresso mess or you have the need/desire
for a machine that anyone can use with little instruction and don't mind
a hunking piece of plastic in your kitchen.

As it happens I have a friend who wants a superauto. I am loath to
recommend one to him because of what I saw in the espresso machine
repair shop. But your 6 year run with constant use is pretty good. Of
course, your claim has no credibility w/o a make and model number and
some research to see if your experience is more than a fluke.

> Have a good day.

Why thank you! You do the same!

R "time for some moka pot coffee" TF


   
Date: 16 Aug 2007 09:13:40
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
What's amazing in a way is that the home superautos sell in roughly the
same price range as what a mid level conventional machine + grinder would
cost you despite all the automation and electronics. But there are no free
lunches - as you point out, one way that they can make the "price point" of
the home supers is by substituting lots of plastic for metal, not just in
the casing of the machine but in the moving parts. Also, the size of the
boiler (if any - some are thermoblock), quality of grinder burrs, etc. on
the home superautos compares to those found on the low end of regular
machines (e.g. Saeco, not surprising since Saeco makes the guts of most home
supers however labeled).


"Moka Java" <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com > wrote in message
news:5ihspbF3o5e55U1@mid.individual.net...
> When I stumbled upon alt.coffee some number of years ago I thought I
> wanted a superauto. After researching the issue some I determined that a
> superauto would not give me the kind of control I wanted. Moreover, the
> superautos are very complicated and the home machines are made of plastic
> with lots of plastic gears and low production microelectronics. So I ended
> up with an all metal Silvia and later upgraded to an all metal Andreja.
> Not trouble free but maintenance can be performed by mere mortals with
> simple hand tools. I recall a visit to am espresso machine repair shop
> that was littered with the disassembled carcasses of consumer level
> superautos. I don't know what brands, I don't know what models, but it
> did not look promising that those machines would ever be making espresso
> again.
>
> R "and both of my cars have clutch pedals" TF
>
> Ogre wrote:
>> Lucygrace wrote:
>>> Hi guys,
>>> I'm still in my learning phase here, so could someone kindly explain to
>>> me the definition of a superauto machine vs. a traditional machine?
>>> I'd really appreciate it. Oh and thanks for all the knowledge I've
>>> already picked up while reading this newsgroup.
>>>
>>> I'm working in a coffee shop using a Nuevo Simonelli and espresso
>>> roasted by Cafe D'Arte, which has a wonderfully pleasant chocolate
>>> undertone to it.
>>
>> One button to go from beans and water to espresso. I love my superauto.
>> I don't have the time nor the patience to learn to pull a god shot from a
>> fancy Italian marvel of coffee engineering. Besides, my superauto
>> produces such good shots that I don't feel I'm missing anything.
>>
>> My morning routine is this:
>>
>> 1. Alarm goes off, hit snooze.
>> 2. Repeat step one 1 a half dozen times.
>> 3. Go into kitchen and turn on superauto.
>> 4. Go to restroom while superauto warms up.
>> 5. Press "flush" button on superauto to do a quick cleaning.
>> 6. Feed cats while machine flushes.
>> 7. Put cup under spout and press "shot" button.
>>
>> Warm up time is about one minute. Flush time is about 15 seconds. These
>> two steps are only required when turning the machine on. After that,
>> it's about 30 seconds to make a shot unless it needs more beans, water,
>> or needs to have the grounds receptacle dumped. The quality of the beans
>> makes all the difference in the world.
>>
>> I have a Jura-Capresso E8 and am very happy with the machine.
>>




 
Date: 15 Aug 2007 11:00:28
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
Superautos are "push button" machines - you pour beans in and the machine
grinds them, dispenses them into the internal basket , pulls the shot and
ejects the spend grounds into an internal waste bin. Superautos are the
ones without portafilters (the handle thing). They are very convenient but
the quality is usually not quite as good as a traditional machine.

Conventional portafilter machines that stop the shot after a certain amount
is dispensed (single or double) are called "automatics".


"Lucygrace" <lucygrace@bellsouth.net > wrote in message
news:CgEwi.1127$EK3.571@fe107.usenetserver.com...
> Hi guys,
> I'm still in my learning phase here, so could someone kindly explain to me
> the definition of a superauto machine vs. a traditional machine?
> I'd really appreciate it. Oh and thanks for all the knowledge I've already
> picked up while reading this newsgroup.
>
> I'm working in a coffee shop using a Nuevo Simonelli and espresso roasted
> by Cafe D'Arte, which has a wonderfully pleasant chocolate undertone to
> it.
>
> Thanks,
> LG
>




  
Date: 15 Aug 2007 12:31:10
From: Ken Blake
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 11:00:28 -0400, "Jack Denver"
<nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote:

> Superautos are "push button" machines - you pour beans in and the machine
> grinds them, dispenses them into the internal basket , pulls the shot and
> ejects the spend grounds into an internal waste bin. Superautos are the
> ones without portafilters (the handle thing). They are very convenient but
> the quality is usually not quite as good as a traditional machine.
>
> Conventional portafilter machines that stop the shot after a certain amount
> is dispensed (single or double) are called "automatics".


Is there any degradation of quality in a regular automatic over a
manual machine? Based on your description I wouldn't expect so.

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup


   
Date: 15 Aug 2007 17:14:23
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 12:31:10 -0700, Ken Blake
<kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain > wrote:

>
>Is there any degradation of quality in a regular automatic over a
>manual machine? Based on your description I wouldn't expect so.

"automatic" vs "semi-automatic" (push on/ push off)
or
"automatic" vs "manual" (lever)??

not usually, in the former; sometimes, in the latter.



   
Date: 15 Aug 2007 15:34:54
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
No.

"Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain > wrote in message
news:e2l6c3l2kgapj6o58k20iikupca7d4sjfb@4ax.com...
> On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 11:00:28 -0400, "Jack Denver"
> <nunuvyer@netscape.net> wrote:
>
>> Superautos are "push button" machines - you pour beans in and the machine
>> grinds them, dispenses them into the internal basket , pulls the shot and
>> ejects the spend grounds into an internal waste bin. Superautos are the
>> ones without portafilters (the handle thing). They are very convenient
>> but
>> the quality is usually not quite as good as a traditional machine.
>>
>> Conventional portafilter machines that stop the shot after a certain
>> amount
>> is dispensed (single or double) are called "automatics".
>
>
> Is there any degradation of quality in a regular automatic over a
> manual machine? Based on your description I wouldn't expect so.
>
> --
> Ken Blake
> Please Reply to the Newsgroup




    
Date: 15 Aug 2007 14:46:40
From: Ken Blake
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto
On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 15:34:54 -0400, "Jack Denver"
<nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote:

> No.


Thanks.


> "Ken Blake" <kblake@this.is.an.invalid.domain> wrote in message
> news:e2l6c3l2kgapj6o58k20iikupca7d4sjfb@4ax.com...
> > On Wed, 15 Aug 2007 11:00:28 -0400, "Jack Denver"
> > <nunuvyer@netscape.net> wrote:
> >
> >> Superautos are "push button" machines - you pour beans in and the machine
> >> grinds them, dispenses them into the internal basket , pulls the shot and
> >> ejects the spend grounds into an internal waste bin. Superautos are the
> >> ones without portafilters (the handle thing). They are very convenient
> >> but
> >> the quality is usually not quite as good as a traditional machine.
> >>
> >> Conventional portafilter machines that stop the shot after a certain
> >> amount
> >> is dispensed (single or double) are called "automatics".
> >
> >
> > Is there any degradation of quality in a regular automatic over a
> > manual machine? Based on your description I wouldn't expect so.
> >
> > --
> > Ken Blake
> > Please Reply to the Newsgroup
>

--
Ken Blake
Please Reply to the Newsgroup


 
Date: 15 Aug 2007 10:46:49
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: Definition of Superauto

"Lucygrace" <lucygrace@bellsouth.net > wrote in message
news:CgEwi.1127$EK3.571@fe107.usenetserver.com...
> Hi guys,
> I'm still in my learning phase here, so could someone kindly explain to me
> the definition of a superauto machine vs. a traditional machine?
> I'd really appreciate it. Oh and thanks for all the knowledge I've already
> picked up while reading this newsgroup.
>
> I'm working in a coffee shop using a Nuevo Simonelli and espresso roasted
> by Cafe D'Arte, which has a wonderfully pleasant chocolate undertone to
> it.
>
> Thanks,
> LG
>

Google's your friend.
Craig.