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Date: 01 Feb 2007 00:23:48
From: SnizbutsDad
Subject: Espresso shot volumes
I've got a commercial gaggia single group espresso machine at home
which makes great coffee, but I'm confused about the size of an
espresso shot. If I use the double basket in the portafilter with two
measures of coffee from my grinder doser, properly tamped, the shot
starts like Schomers dark brown crema but then the shot runs clear
into one commercial espresso shot glass. If I stop the coffee when
instinct tells me it's ready, it would be a ristretto I think. Am I
doing something wrong?

thanks.





 
Date: 01 Feb 2007 19:32:46
From: Danny
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
SnizbutsDad wrote:
> I've got a commercial gaggia single group espresso machine at home
> which makes great coffee, but I'm confused about the size of an
> espresso shot. If I use the double basket in the portafilter with two
> measures of coffee from my grinder doser, properly tamped, the shot
> starts like Schomers dark brown crema but then the shot runs clear
> into one commercial espresso shot glass. If I stop the coffee when
> instinct tells me it's ready, it would be a ristretto I think. Am I
> doing something wrong?
>
> thanks.
>

Ensure you are using enough coffee - fill the double basket/pf level
to the top, then tamp. You should get 1.5 - 2fl oz. in 20-30 seconds
before the stream lightens significantly. Ensure also that your
coffee is reasonably fresh. Ensure everything is hot - machine, pf
etc. and keep it hot.

--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



 
Date: 01 Feb 2007 07:12:38
From: ramboorider@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
On Feb 1, 9:43 am, "Ronald" <R...@Usenet.only > wrote:

> Shot volume is a cultural thing. In Italy a normal shot is 1/3 of a tazzina.
> A ristretto is less, some 1/4 cup. Even a lungo hardly reaches 1/2 cup.

What's a tazzina? And do you mean 1/4 CUP less or 1/4 ounce?

FWIW (and I realize that's not much), I tend to stop the pour at 1.5
oz when I'm drinking a straight shot - at that point the pour has
lightened up but hasn't started blonding yet. I'm not sure if this is
the volume thought of as a ristretto or not, but it seems to be where
I get the best taste in a shot. The pour usually takes 20-25 seconds.
When I'm making a milk drink, I generally let the pour go to 2 oz or
even slightly more. It's generally just started blonding when I stop
the pour. This is usually closer to 30 seconds.

-Ray



  
Date: 01 Feb 2007 13:24:41
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
A tazzina is a "little cup" - those little demistasse espresso cups that
Italians use, often with the logo of the bean supplier. There is no exact
standard but typically they'd be around 3 oz. to the rim. Also I'd point
out that the normal Italian shot is a single. So 1 oz. single, 3/4 oz.
ristretto as per the original post. A double would be twice that - 1.5 to
2 oz. So you are on the same page.






<ramboorider@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1170342758.513782.47830@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> On Feb 1, 9:43 am, "Ronald" <R...@Usenet.only> wrote:
>
>> Shot volume is a cultural thing. In Italy a normal shot is 1/3 of a
>> tazzina.
>> A ristretto is less, some 1/4 cup. Even a lungo hardly reaches 1/2 cup.
>
> What's a tazzina? And do you mean 1/4 CUP less or 1/4 ounce?
>
> FWIW (and I realize that's not much), I tend to stop the pour at 1.5
> oz when I'm drinking a straight shot - at that point the pour has
> lightened up but hasn't started blonding yet. I'm not sure if this is
> the volume thought of as a ristretto or not, but it seems to be where
> I get the best taste in a shot. The pour usually takes 20-25 seconds.
> When I'm making a milk drink, I generally let the pour go to 2 oz or
> even slightly more. It's generally just started blonding when I stop
> the pour. This is usually closer to 30 seconds.
>
> -Ray
>




 
Date: 01 Feb 2007 01:41:41
From: SnizbutsDad
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
On Feb 1, 9:07 am, "Jasonian" <jason.hae...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Feb 1, 2:23 am, "SnizbutsDad" <p...@rockfaith.net> wrote:
>
> > I've got a commercial gaggia single group espresso machine at home
> > which makes great coffee, but I'm confused about the size of an
> > espresso shot. If I use the double basket in the portafilter with two
> > measures of coffee from my grinder doser, properly tamped, the shot
> > starts like Schomers dark brown crema but then the shot runs clear
> > into one commercial espresso shot glass. If I stop the coffee when
> > instinct tells me it's ready, it would be a ristretto I think. Am I
> > doing something wrong?
>
> > thanks.
>
> First of all, you haven't told us how much volume the resulting "shot"
> is.
>
> Second, how fresh is the coffee you're using?
>
> Stop it when instinct tells you to. Ignore everything else. If it
> pulls a smaller volume in the same time, coarsen the grind a bit. If
> it's running quickly, and quickly running blond, you might have some
> errors in your barista skills, or the coffee could just be old enough
> to be considered compost.

Okay, the double shot runs clear around the time it reaches the line
on a single shot glass. I'm using very fresh coffee, I roast my own
using a Genesis roaster, and I try very hard using Schomers technique
to fill and tamp the portafilter correctly. I've noticed that the top
of the puck is indented after the shot is pulled, maybe my sprinkler
mesh needs replacing?



  
Date: 01 Feb 2007 10:20:09
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
Set up about six shot glasses and catch the first part of the pull, say the
first five seconds, then move in the next shot glass for the second five
seconds and so on till you've pulled a 30 second shot. Taste all and see
where the sweet spot begins and ends.
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"SnizbutsDad"
wrote in message
news:1170322901.047155.120660@h3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
<SNIP >
> Okay, the double shot runs clear around the time it reaches the line
> on a single shot glass. I'm using very fresh coffee, I roast my own
> using a Genesis roaster, and I try very hard using Schomers technique
> to fill and tamp the portafilter correctly. I've noticed that the top
> of the puck is indented after the shot is pulled, maybe my sprinkler
> mesh needs replacing?
>




   
Date: 01 Feb 2007 11:42:57
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
Ed Needham wrote:

> Set up about six shot glasses and catch the first part of the pull, say the
> first five seconds, then move in the next shot glass for the second five
> seconds and so on till you've pulled a 30 second shot. Taste all and see
> where the sweet spot begins and ends.

Lurker butts in:

So common sense, I love it! Yet I never thought of it. I'll give it a try.

I honestly don't know if I'm building good or bad habits. But I know
what I like to drink.

I didn't know what a "tazzina" was either, but apparently I use one
every day. I guess my instincts/tastes have been about right. My
entire process:

Turn on the Gaggia Classic. Fill the tazzina twice, 3/4 full with milk,
and dump it into the SS pitcher. Grind two measures of beans in my
Gaggia MDF. After it's cycled on and off at least once, I'll run the
water through the portafilter into the tazzina at couple of times,
dumping the hot water into my mug. This preheats both the tazzina that
I use in place of two shot glasses, and my mug.

After the machine has been on 5 to ten minutes, I dump the water from my
mug and put a few drops of sugar free hazelnut syrup in the bottom
(yeah, I know, but that's what I like). I take the portafilter off,
wipe it out, fill it with the coffee and tamp.

I go roughly 2/3 to 3/4 of the way up the tazzina for two measures of
coffee into my Gaggia Classic. I arrived at the cup level by eyeballing
how far two shot glasses filled it. I don't bother with two clear shot
glasses, I just fill the small cup, it centers nicely under the split
portafilter. I suppose I can't see how much crema I have, but there's
no shortage with the Gaggia Classic and fresh roasted beans, so I don't
obsess over the details. It usually takes 15 to 20 seconds to fill the
cup, and there's lots of crema. I dump the espresso in the mug, leaving
the inverted tazzina on top while I steam the milk.

I aim for as much microfoam as I can get. It just tastes sweeter than
if I blindly steam the milk. I aim for a final temperature of 150
degrees. I swirl the mug with the espresso while I pour in the foamed
milk, and top with a very light dusting of very finely grated dark
chocolate. Not so much chocolate that the foam instantly breaks down,
just a tiny bit of dust, enough to see and smell. It's odd that a
bitter tasting chocolate makes the drink taste sweeter, but it does.
It's the nose or the aroma of the chocolate.

I often wonder if a more educated palate would enjoy what I drink or
call it swill! Friends and family compliment me, but who knows. I can
tell you that if I try ordering what I make at a Starbucks (or similar),
it never comes out right. It always has FAR too much syrup, too much
steamed milk (not enough foam), and not enough espresso. Yet at
Starbucks, it still has a burnt taste, even over the massive amount of
syrup!


  
Date: 01 Feb 2007 15:43:53
From: Ronald
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes


"SnizbutsDad" <paul@rockfaith.net > wrote in message
news:1170322901.047155.120660@h3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> On Feb 1, 9:07 am, "Jasonian" <jason.hae...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Feb 1, 2:23 am, "SnizbutsDad" <p...@rockfaith.net> wrote:
>>
>> > I've got a commercial gaggia single group espresso machine at home
>> > which makes great coffee, but I'm confused about the size of an
>> > espresso shot. If I use the double basket in the portafilter with two
>> > measures of coffee from my grinder doser, properly tamped, the shot
>> > starts like Schomers dark brown crema but then the shot runs clear
>> > into one commercial espresso shot glass. If I stop the coffee when
>> > instinct tells me it's ready, it would be a ristretto I think. Am I
>> > doing something wrong?
>>
>> > thanks.
>>
>> First of all, you haven't told us how much volume the resulting "shot"
>> is.
>>
>> Second, how fresh is the coffee you're using?
>>
>> Stop it when instinct tells you to. Ignore everything else. If it
>> pulls a smaller volume in the same time, coarsen the grind a bit. If
>> it's running quickly, and quickly running blond, you might have some
>> errors in your barista skills, or the coffee could just be old enough
>> to be considered compost.
>
> Okay, the double shot runs clear around the time it reaches the line
> on a single shot glass. I'm using very fresh coffee, I roast my own
> using a Genesis roaster, and I try very hard using Schomers technique
> to fill and tamp the portafilter correctly. I've noticed that the top
> of the puck is indented after the shot is pulled, maybe my sprinkler
> mesh needs replacing?
>

Tamping never solves any problems if the grind is even.
Shot volume is a cultural thing. In Italy a normal shot is 1/3 of a tazzina.
A ristretto is less, some 1/4 cup. Even a lungo hardly reaches 1/2 cup.

So grind finer or put some more coffee in the pf.

Ronald



 
Date: 01 Feb 2007 01:07:40
From: Jasonian
Subject: Re: Espresso shot volumes
On Feb 1, 2:23 am, "SnizbutsDad" <p...@rockfaith.net > wrote:
> I've got a commercial gaggia single group espresso machine at home
> which makes great coffee, but I'm confused about the size of an
> espresso shot. If I use the double basket in the portafilter with two
> measures of coffee from my grinder doser, properly tamped, the shot
> starts like Schomers dark brown crema but then the shot runs clear
> into one commercial espresso shot glass. If I stop the coffee when
> instinct tells me it's ready, it would be a ristretto I think. Am I
> doing something wrong?
>
> thanks.

First of all, you haven't told us how much volume the resulting "shot"
is.

Second, how fresh is the coffee you're using?

Stop it when instinct tells you to. Ignore everything else. If it
pulls a smaller volume in the same time, coarsen the grind a bit. If
it's running quickly, and quickly running blond, you might have some
errors in your barista skills, or the coffee could just be old enough
to be considered compost.