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Date: 30 Sep 2006 12:26:41
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Fire hazard
A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived, I
noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?






 
Date: 02 Oct 2006 15:15:03
From: Brent
Subject: Re: Fire hazard
Like all these gadgets, used for their purpose, they are great, when you
don't need one, or it interferes they are a pain.

Spent two hours removing breakers from a bunch of circuit boards so they
could run overloaded...

Brent

>A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
>clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
>causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
>GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived,
>I noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
>questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
>And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?
>




 
Date: 01 Oct 2006 01:20:30
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Fire hazard

Robert Harmon wrote:

>
> I leave my Cimbali on 24/7 & I'll do the same for the Bunn after I restore
> it.

Wow. you must have / will have quite the electric bill.

and why restore a bunnn?



 
Date: 01 Oct 2006 01:18:56
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Fire hazard
A gfi would not have helped with the radio. -- 2 wire plug -- fully
insulated.

Don't obsess!

chill.

Dave
Harry Moos wrote:
> A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
> clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
> causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
> GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived, I
> noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
> questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
> And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?



 
Date: 30 Sep 2006 18:02:15
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Fire hazard
GFCI's priily prevent shocks from current leaks. A newer device, the arc
fault interrupter, prevents fires from arcing (frayed) wiring. I suppose to
be doubly safe you could install an AFI in the breaker box and a GCFI at the
outlet.

Current US codes require all potentially wet locations to have GFCI's, again
priily to prevent shock. This would include bathrooms, kitchens,
basements, garages, outdoor outlets, etc. Fridges should not be GFCI
protected so that they don't trip off and spoil your food.




"Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net > wrote in message
news:FvGdnZVip95ZNYPYnZ2dnUVZ_tidnZ2d@news.ruraltel.net...
>A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
>clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
>causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
>GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived,
>I noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
>questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
>And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?
>




 
Date: 30 Sep 2006 18:55:40
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Fire hazard
On Sat, 30 Sep 2006 12:26:41 -0500, "Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net >
wrote:

>A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
>clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
>causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
>GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived, I
>noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
>questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
>And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?

My espresso machine is on a GFI. My first indication that its boiler
was leaking was when it tripped the GFI. Yup. They work.

shall


 
Date: 30 Sep 2006 12:21:22
From: Ken Fox
Subject: Re: Fire hazard
"Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net > wrote in message
news:FvGdnZVip95ZNYPYnZ2dnUVZ_tidnZ2d@news.ruraltel.net...
>A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
>clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
>causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
>GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived,
>I noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
>questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
>And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?
>

This has been extensively discussed recently, in this and I think other
threads:

http://groups.google.com/group/alt.coffee/browse_frm/thread/c16a4fc2d07e0e6d/450e1724064b59b8?lnk=gst&q=gfci&rnum=1#450e1724064b59b8




 
Date: 30 Sep 2006 18:21:06
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Fire hazard
A ground fault interrupter will provide fire protection indirectly only, in
that the circuit MAY break before a short causes a fire. I made GFIs
standard for every outlet in my home when I had it built. Maybe it was
overkill, but you should at least have GFI outlets for the kitchen, garage,
bathrooms, & exterior outlets.

I leave my Cimbali on 24/7 & I'll do the same for the Bunn after I restore
it. More important than GFI, IMHO, is being positive that your wiring can
carry the amps necessary for an espresso machine. If you can't put it on a
separate circuit make sure you know which appliances and/or lights can be
safely on concurrent with the espresso machine.
--
Robert (In all things, make safety first a rule!) Harmon
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/psfob
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r

"Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net > wrote in message
news:FvGdnZVip95ZNYPYnZ2dnUVZ_tidnZ2d@news.ruraltel.net...
>A neighbor's house burned last week. They believe it started with a
>clock-radio. I remember the fire shall telling us that the two leading
>causes of home fires were toasters and coffeemakers. Anyway, I installed
>GFCI outlets throughout the kitchen this week. Then, when Silvia arrived,
>I noticed that the instruction manual recommended a GFCI circuit. Two
>questions. Do most of you have a GFCI outlet for your espresso machine?
>And does a GFCI protect against fire as well as electric shock?
>