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Date: 21 Sep 2006 11:25:25
From:
Subject: French or espresso roast ?
Hope you can answer this question for me.

I've always believed that French roast was the maximum roast you could
get. And I'm pretty sure that this was true when I used to live in
another city. I'd use an espresso roast to make espresso and a French
roast for my stove top. These combo gave me the coffee that I wanted
out of each. Switching it would give me a dull coffee from my stove top
and a harsh, bitter espresso.

Having moved (we are talking 20km here, not across the globe) I found
the espresso roast to still give me a proper espresso but the french
roast gives me a dull coffee from my stove top. I asked my coffee
supplier if he had anything more roasted then his French roast and he
suggested trying the espresso roast. I did and, just as I had expected,
got a dull coffee from my stove top. Where exacly is the French roast
suppose to sit in the chain of roasting ? Was my previous supplier out
of order with his over burned beans and what exacly should I ask my
current supplier for if I want something with more punch then his
espresso roast ? Right now, I'm using Lavazza ground coffee for my
stove top. Not what I use to get, but it tastes something pleasant at
least.

Stefan Mazur





 
Date: 25 Sep 2006 19:02:21
From: Eureka
Subject: Re: French or espresso roast ?
Stefan,
I'll try to keep it as simple as possible. French Roast, NY Roast,
Colombian Roast, and including Espresso Roast as you probably know are
variations of degrees of roasting to satisfy different tastes. I agree with
you that if you were to use the fine ground of an Espresso roast over your
stove top that would produce a brew that'd be somewhat different and or
perhaps not the desired result and the same can be said about the resulting
brew from using regular ground in an Espresso machine.

Notwithstanding all of this I assure you that one must look for the quality
and origin of the beans first and foremost when trying to achieve the degree
of roasting that you want. In other words the degree of roasting is
secondary to the quality and origin of the beans. All you have to do is
follow the links that are suggested by posters in this NG and you will
certainly get overwhelmed by so many coffees that some of the links like
Sweetia's has to offer. I suggest you keep an open mind about all of
this when you look for the best beans you can buy. Today, there is no
shortage of sources selling wholesale beans. The question really is.... How
do I know the real origin and quality of the beans they are selling me when
in fact they themselves don't really know the answer? You see... coffee
beans.... they all look pretty much the same to the naked eye.

At www.cafedepr.com we are only selling coffee beans that we can guarantee
to be pure Arabica grown in the mountain shade of small farms in Puerto
Rico. We only deal directly with two farmers that grow their own coffee and
we guarantee this.

Glad to be of help
Felix


<smazur@ers.ca > wrote in message
news:1158863125.136159.176900@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...
> Hope you can answer this question for me.
>
> I've always believed that French roast was the maximum roast you could
> get. And I'm pretty sure that this was true when I used to live in
> another city. I'd use an espresso roast to make espresso and a French
> roast for my stove top. These combo gave me the coffee that I wanted
> out of each. Switching it would give me a dull coffee from my stove top
> and a harsh, bitter espresso.
>
> Having moved (we are talking 20km here, not across the globe) I found
> the espresso roast to still give me a proper espresso but the french
> roast gives me a dull coffee from my stove top. I asked my coffee
> supplier if he had anything more roasted then his French roast and he
> suggested trying the espresso roast. I did and, just as I had expected,
> got a dull coffee from my stove top. Where exacly is the French roast
> suppose to sit in the chain of roasting ? Was my previous supplier out
> of order with his over burned beans and what exacly should I ask my
> current supplier for if I want something with more punch then his
> espresso roast ? Right now, I'm using Lavazza ground coffee for my
> stove top. Not what I use to get, but it tastes something pleasant at
> least.
>
> Stefan Mazur
>




 
Date: 22 Sep 2006 19:06:58
From:
Subject: Re: French or espresso roast ?

smazur@ers.ca wrote:
> Hope you can answer this question for me.
>
> ...................................................................Was my previous supplier out
> of order with his over burned beans and what exacly should I ask my
> current supplier for if I want something with more punch then his
> espresso roast ? Right now, I'm using Lavazza ground coffee for my
> stove top. Not what I use to get, but it tastes something pleasant at
> least.
>
> Stefan Mazur

My take on this is, I would possible ask your current supplier for a
BLEND in a french roast. A lot of the time roasters will think that
they can get away with an inferior quality coffee bean because they are
roasting it so dark (french, Italian, Spanish). You see at such a dark
roast you do lose almost all of the unique origin taste of bean and
take on the bittersweet flavors of the late-late 2nd crack. But to
offer something in the cup, you have to have a wonderful bean to start
with and/or blend with good traditionally dark roasted coffees like
Indonessian and African. Also watch you grinds, I have found some
"stove top" customers perfer an almost Turkish grind, telling me that
it helped them extract the flavor they were looking for. hope maybe
this helps.



 
Date: 21 Sep 2006 19:45:14
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: French or espresso roast ?
On 21 Sep 2006 11:25:25 -0700, smazur@ers.ca wrote:

>Hope you can answer this question for me.
>
>I've always believed that French roast was the maximum roast you could
>get. And I'm pretty sure that this was true when I used to live in
>another city. I'd use an espresso roast to make espresso and a French
>roast for my stove top. These combo gave me the coffee that I wanted
>out of each. Switching it would give me a dull coffee from my stove top
>and a harsh, bitter espresso.

Interestingly, the L.A. Times did a story yesterday on "French
roasts," and assembled a (reluctant) panel to taste 13 of them. At
least two of the panelists (Parsons and Pasquini) are knowledgeable
about coffee.
http://www.latimes.com/features/food/la-fo-coffee20sep20,1,267992.story

Jones and Groundwork emerged as the most pleasing, with Chuck Jones'
blend the winner.

As the Times put it: "The coffee wonks were right: In general, these
coffees were mostly unpleasant -- bitter and burnt-tasting. As we
smelled and sipped and swirled cup after cup, all brewed identically
in French presses and tasted blind, we were struck by how similar so
many of them were. A couple stood above the rest, though, both local
micro-roasters."

shall


 
Date: 21 Sep 2006 15:09:11
From: Steve Ackman
Subject: Re: French or espresso roast ?
In <1158863125.136159.176900@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com >, on 21 Sep 2006
11:25:25 -0700, smazur@ers.ca wrote:
> Hope you can answer this question for me.
>
> Where exacly is the French roast
> suppose to sit in the chain of roasting ?

Somewhere dark. Might be 30 seconds into 2nd crack.
Might be after 2nd crack is completely finished.
There is no universal standard, so each roaster
decides for himself exactly what roast to apply to
what label... or vice versa.

> Was my previous supplier out
> of order with his over burned beans

Any roaster is out of order with burned beans if
they're not labeled Spanish (which seems to at least
have *some* agreement on being the darkest roast there
is, i.e., just this side of charcoal).

> and what exacly should I ask my
> current supplier for if I want something with more punch then his
> espresso roast ?

Depends on the blend, and it depends on what you mean
by "punch." Lighter roasts will give more acidity.
Darker, more bitterness... in general.

Talk to the roaster rather than the PBTC.
He can fill you in on what blends or origins he has
that will most likely approximate the flavor you're
looking for.


 
Date: 21 Sep 2006 18:31:55
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: French or espresso roast ?
Try this link & I think you'll find the answer:
http://www.sweetias.com/roasted.pict-guide.html
--
Robert (duck & cover) Harmon
http://tinyurl.com/pou2y
http://tinyurl.com/psfob
http://tinyurl.com/fkd6r

<smazur@ers.ca > wrote in message
news:1158863125.136159.176900@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...
> Hope you can answer this question for me.
>
> I've always believed that French roast was the maximum roast you could
> get. And I'm pretty sure that this was true when I used to live in
> another city. I'd use an espresso roast to make espresso and a French
> roast for my stove top. These combo gave me the coffee that I wanted
> out of each. Switching it would give me a dull coffee from my stove top
> and a harsh, bitter espresso.
>
> Having moved (we are talking 20km here, not across the globe) I found
> the espresso roast to still give me a proper espresso but the french
> roast gives me a dull coffee from my stove top. I asked my coffee
> supplier if he had anything more roasted then his French roast and he
> suggested trying the espresso roast. I did and, just as I had expected,
> got a dull coffee from my stove top. Where exacly is the French roast
> suppose to sit in the chain of roasting ? Was my previous supplier out
> of order with his over burned beans and what exacly should I ask my
> current supplier for if I want something with more punch then his
> espresso roast ? Right now, I'm using Lavazza ground coffee for my
> stove top. Not what I use to get, but it tastes something pleasant at
> least.
>
> Stefan Mazur
>