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Date: 05 Mar 2007 00:13:52
From: SnizzbutsDad
Subject: Frothing problems on San Marco
Hi,

I'm just upgraded my espresso machine from a Italcrem Gaggia Espanola
single group (with a frothing nozzle upgrade) to a fantastic La San
co 105s. I've been studying Schomer's instructions on how to froth
milk, and I understand the theory. I've got a large stainless steel
milk jug, thermometer, cold full cream milk. However, the milk heats
up past the 'stretching' stage in about 5 seconds and the milk takes
about 15 seconds to reach temperature. It's very frustrating. I've
tried adjusting the steam pressure, different angles and different
parts of the jug with the steam wand. I've tried dipping the wand up
and down, and swirling the milk. The wand is great for heating milk
but I just can't get the frothing side right. On the Gaggia with the
frothing nozzle I was able to produce lots of fine froth, with the San
co, hot milk with bubbles on the top.

thanks
Paul





 
Date: 07 Mar 2007 05:14:44
From: SnizzbutsDad
Subject: Re: Frothing problems on San Marco
On 5, 11:36 am, m...@dwf.de wrote:
> SnizzbutsDad <p...@rockfaith.net> wrote:
> > I'm just upgraded my espresso machine from a Italcrem Gaggia Espanola
> > single group (with a frothing nozzle upgrade) to a fantastic LaSan
> >co105s.
>
> [...]
>
> > On the Gaggia with the frothing nozzle I was able to produce lots
> > of fine froth, with theSanco, hot milk with bubbles on the top.
>
> Practice makes perfect. I own a single group LaSanco85/16 Practical
> with a 5l boiler. It took me about 10l milk until I managed to get a decent
> froth. Now I can make the finest latte art froth from 200ml milk upward...
>
> The secret is: "don't use the full steam for the 'slurping' phase". My LSM
> has a lever to regulate steam flow, and you have to use it sensitively
> for the first frothing phase. Don't blow the full amount of steam in
> your milk, I repeatedly managed to empty the jug...
>
> After the "slurping" phase you can put the wand fully inside the milk and
> give full steam (with enough milk in the pitcher, don't try this with less
> than 300ml).
>
> tin

Hey yes. I've got the hang of it now. I need to make sure that the
steam wand is absolutely vertical, then start very carefully with the
steam on quite low, and once the froth appears, turn it on full, wow,
takes about 8 seconds for masses of froth. Just need to practice
getting the froth a bit finer now. Thanks for your help.

Paul



 
Date: 05 Mar 2007 11:36:13
From:
Subject: Re: Frothing problems on San Marco
SnizzbutsDad <paul@rockfaith.net > wrote:

> I'm just upgraded my espresso machine from a Italcrem Gaggia Espanola
> single group (with a frothing nozzle upgrade) to a fantastic La San
> co 105s.

[...]


> On the Gaggia with the frothing nozzle I was able to produce lots
> of fine froth, with the San co, hot milk with bubbles on the top.


Practice makes perfect. I own a single group La San co 85/16 Practical
with a 5l boiler. It took me about 10l milk until I managed to get a decent
froth. Now I can make the finest latte art froth from 200ml milk upward...

The secret is: "don't use the full steam for the 'slurping' phase". My LSM
has a lever to regulate steam flow, and you have to use it sensitively
for the first frothing phase. Don't blow the full amount of steam in
your milk, I repeatedly managed to empty the jug...

After the "slurping" phase you can put the wand fully inside the milk and
give full steam (with enough milk in the pitcher, don't try this with less
than 300ml).

tin


 
Date: 05 Mar 2007 09:06:19
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: Frothing problems on San Marco
Buy a 1.5 liter jug. Seriously. Practice with that, then work your way down.


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au