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Date: 04 Oct 2006 12:54:43
From: Jim
Subject: Gaggia Classic Steam
I've had my machine for a week, but it still seems like it often runs
out of steam before I can do 6 or 8 ounces of milk right. I've tried
different degrees of opening the valve, and I've let it warm up for the
six minutes. But by the time I purge the water/condensation, then start
my milk, more often than not I don't hit 150 degrees before the pilot
light goes out and the heater comes on.

Any tips?




 
Date: 05 Oct 2006 16:11:36
From: Mud Pup
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam
Jim wrote:
>
> Any tips?

Start steaming right before the light comes on, and find the amount
to open it such that the milk will swirl but it doesn't lose
pressure throughout the steaming. For me this is 3/4 of a turn.


  
Date: 05 Oct 2006 11:23:14
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam
Mud Pup wrote:

> Jim wrote:
>
>>Any tips?
>
>
> Start steaming right before the light comes on, and find the amount
> to open it such that the milk will swirl but it doesn't lose
> pressure throughout the steaming. For me this is 3/4 of a turn.

I'll pay more attention to how much I open the valve. You just guess
when the light is about to come on?


   
Date: 05 Oct 2006 20:11:43
From: Mud Pup
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam
Jim wrote:
>
> I'll pay more attention to how much I open the valve. You just guess
> when the light is about to come on?

Well, you kind of learn when it's about to come on by the
time, the sound, amount of spitting coming out of the tip, etc.
Sometimes I open it up a little before hand to test it.
Just practice, you'll get it.

Regarding flushing, a tip someone once shared with me is
to flush through the portafilter into your cup(s). This
warms them both.


 
Date: 05 Oct 2006 23:20:41
From: Natalie Drest
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam

"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com > wrote in message
news:12i84br45e28755@corp.supernews.com...
> I've had my machine for a week, but it still seems like it often runs out
> of steam before I can do 6 or 8 ounces of milk right. I've tried
> different degrees of opening the valve, and I've let it warm up for the
> six minutes. But by the time I purge the water/condensation, then start
> my milk, more often than not I don't hit 150 degrees before the pilot
> light goes out and the heater comes on.
>
> Any tips?

The pilot light going out isn't a problem- some people time things so that
it's always out, that way the element is on the whole time & higher temp &
pressure is available for steaming. Running out of team altogether IS a
problem

Your problem is that the domestic Gaggias have very small boilers (the
different models all use the same boiler). You're not experiencing anything
out of the ordinary. One workaround is to steam smaller amounts, say 1 or 2
lattes worth. When the steam runs out, run the pump 'til water comes out the
portafilter; the tiny boiler is now full. The upside of having such a small
boiler is that it'll reach steaming temp very quickly, maybe 30 sec. &
you're good to go again.

Purging should only take a second or so, BTW. Don't waste the steam!


--
"I won't go into binary counting here. For further information you can
search the Internet, or cut off all but one of your fingers."
-Roger Nichols




  
Date: 05 Oct 2006 11:22:16
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam
Natalie Drest wrote:

> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
> news:12i84br45e28755@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>I've had my machine for a week, but it still seems like it often runs out
>>of steam before I can do 6 or 8 ounces of milk right. I've tried
>>different degrees of opening the valve, and I've let it warm up for the
>>six minutes. But by the time I purge the water/condensation, then start
>>my milk, more often than not I don't hit 150 degrees before the pilot
>>light goes out and the heater comes on.
>>
>>Any tips?
>
>
> The pilot light going out isn't a problem- some people time things so that
> it's always out, that way the element is on the whole time & higher temp &
> pressure is available for steaming. Running out of team altogether IS a
> problem
>
> Your problem is that the domestic Gaggias have very small boilers (the
> different models all use the same boiler). You're not experiencing anything
> out of the ordinary. One workaround is to steam smaller amounts, say 1 or 2
> lattes worth. When the steam runs out, run the pump 'til water comes out the
> portafilter; the tiny boiler is now full.

Maybe some of this is user error. I've been priming by slapping all the
switches on with the valve open and running a few ounces of water
through the steam wand. I thought that's what the instructions call
for. But it also leaves water in the wand and makes it harder to purge.
If I can accomplish the same thing by priming through the portafilter,
I'll do it that way. I won't have to purge as long, so that will help some.

The upside of having such a small
> boiler is that it'll reach steaming temp very quickly, maybe 30 sec. &
> you're good to go again.
>
> Purging should only take a second or so, BTW. Don't waste the steam!
>
>


   
Date: 06 Oct 2006 11:10:06
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam
Jim wrote:

> Natalie Drest wrote:
>
>> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>> news:12i84br45e28755@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>> I've had my machine for a week, but it still seems like it often runs
>>> out of steam before I can do 6 or 8 ounces of milk right. I've tried
>>> different degrees of opening the valve, and I've let it warm up for
>>> the six minutes. But by the time I purge the water/condensation,
>>> then start my milk, more often than not I don't hit 150 degrees
>>> before the pilot light goes out and the heater comes on.
>>>
>>> Any tips?
>>
>>
>>
>> The pilot light going out isn't a problem- some people time things so
>> that it's always out, that way the element is on the whole time &
>> higher temp & pressure is available for steaming. Running out of team
>> altogether IS a problem
>>
>> Your problem is that the domestic Gaggias have very small boilers (the
>> different models all use the same boiler). You're not experiencing
>> anything out of the ordinary. One workaround is to steam smaller
>> amounts, say 1 or 2 lattes worth. When the steam runs out, run the
>> pump 'til water comes out the portafilter; the tiny boiler is now full.
>
>
> Maybe some of this is user error. I've been priming by slapping all the
> switches on with the valve open and running a few ounces of water
> through the steam wand. I thought that's what the instructions call
> for. But it also leaves water in the wand and makes it harder to purge.
> If I can accomplish the same thing by priming through the portafilter,
> I'll do it that way. I won't have to purge as long, so that will help
> some.

I tried the above method today, and it worked great. I think much of my
problem was following Gaggia instruction of pumping water through the
steam wand to prime. When I primed through the portafilter, then let
the steam heat on for a few minutes, it worked great.

Then I cooled the boiler and heated the portafilter by letting steam
through the portafilter and hot water until it got down to coffee
temperature.

Or do those of you who steam milk do the milk after the shots?


>
> The upside of having such a small
>
>> boiler is that it'll reach steaming temp very quickly, maybe 30 sec. &
>> you're good to go again.
>>
>> Purging should only take a second or so, BTW. Don't waste the steam!
>>
>>


    
Date: 10 Oct 2006 17:30:38
From: hudson
Subject: Re: Gaggia Classic Steam

"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com > wrote in message
news:12id6voohi9hnff@corp.supernews.com...
> Jim wrote:
>
>
> I tried the above method today, and it worked great. I think much of my
> problem was following Gaggia instruction of pumping water through the
> steam wand to prime. When I primed through the portafilter, then let the
> steam heat on for a few minutes, it worked great.
>
> Then I cooled the boiler and heated the portafilter by letting steam
> through the portafilter and hot water until it got down to coffee
> temperature.
>
> Or do those of you who steam milk do the milk after the shots?
>
>

After the shots then refill the boiler by turning the switches to brew and
blowing the remaining steam through the brewhead without the portafilter
attached. This blows the crap off the screen, also quickly flick the
switches to steam with the valve open to clear the steam pipe of any milk in
the tip.

Stuart