coffee-forum.net
Promoting coffee discussion.

Main
Date: 04 May 2007 01:59:13
From: kramerica
Subject: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use
Hey everybody,
As you know the Gaggias use an aluminum boiler, that is sensitive to
corrosion and scaling.

Which water is best used with that machine? Tap, mineral, filtered?

thanks a lot..

Yaron





 
Date: 11 May 2007 07:26:06
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use
And if you do feel the need to crack the boiler, be aware that a thin
film of deposits in the boiler is a *GOOD* thing. It's protecting the
bare aluminum from the galvanic corrosion David is talking about. So
unless the boiler has a heavy (?) build up of mineral deposits don't
take the boiler down to bare metal.

Robert Harmon

On May 4, 9:19 pm, r...@math.hawaii.NOSPAM.edu (D. Ross) wrote:
> kramerica <y.avra...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>


  
Date: 11 May 2007 23:18:00
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use


 
Date: 11 May 2007 06:00:16
From: Dave b
Subject: Re: Something I heard on the Brita + tip
On May 11, 7:44 am, kramerica <y.avra...@gmail.com > wrote:
> I've seen at another coffee forum (Israeli one), someone that claims
> that the Brita water are a bit too acidic for coffee machines, and
> that can hurt the boiler.
>
> He suggests a salt treatment to the filter every 3 weeks (since his
> water are already filtered he doesn't replace the Brita filter at all,
> just uses the Brita as a water softener). This treatment replaces the
> Hydrogen ions in the filter to Sodium ions, thus not turning every
> neutral substance in the water into acid. He also claims that the
> coffee tastes better afterwards. I've tried that, didn't notice any
> flavor change, but i was wondering, is it really better for the
> machine?
>
> Any inputs on that?
>
> P.S: The treatment: Dilute 2 tbl spoons of salt in a half a cup of
> water and pass it through the filter. After that, pass 2 liters of
> water through the filter and the Brita in order to rinse the salt
> remains... and that's it.

I have not heard that. but it would be easy to check that [strange]
assumption with pH test strips or a pH meter.




 
Date: 11 May 2007 04:44:29
From: kramerica
Subject: Something I heard on the Brita + tip
I've seen at another coffee forum (Israeli one), someone that claims
that the Brita water are a bit too acidic for coffee machines, and
that can hurt the boiler.

He suggests a salt treatment to the filter every 3 weeks (since his
water are already filtered he doesn't replace the Brita filter at all,
just uses the Brita as a water softener). This treatment replaces the
Hydrogen ions in the filter to Sodium ions, thus not turning every
neutral substance in the water into acid. He also claims that the
coffee tastes better afterwards. I've tried that, didn't notice any
flavor change, but i was wondering, is it really better for the
machine?

Any inputs on that?


P.S: The treatment: Dilute 2 tbl spoons of salt in a half a cup of
water and pass it through the filter. After that, pass 2 liters of
water through the filter and the Brita in order to rinse the salt
remains... and that's it.



 
Date: 10 May 2007 14:43:52
From: Dave b
Subject: Re: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use
On May 4, 12:37 pm, "Cordovero" <cordoveroremove...@yahooxxx.com >
wrote:
> For all three waters you mentioned, it all depends on its mineral content
> concentration. If the "filtered" means Brita, then you might as well take
> out some of the chlorine, but it won't affect scaling, just taste. This is
> my understanding.
>
> So you have to check mineral concentrations, which can often be done by
> googling your local water department's website. They have to give out the
> concentration so that folks like me can set their house water softeners on
> the right setting.
>
> For my Gaggias, I used purified (reverse osmosis) water, plus a splash of
> filtered tap water.
>
> C
>
> "kramerica" <y.avra...@gmail.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1178269153.306187.272310@e65g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
>
> > Hey everybody,
> > As you know the Gaggias use an aluminum boiler, that is sensitive to
> > corrosion and scaling.
>
> > Which water is best used with that machine? Tap, mineral, filtered?
>
> > thanks a lot..
>
> > Yaron

Using a Brita on LA water helped reduce the need for descaling. 3
year test.

regards

dave



 
Date: 05 May 2007 17:34:39
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use
On May 4, 4:59 am, kramerica <y.avra...@gmail.com > wrote:
> Hey everybody,
> As you know the Gaggias use an aluminum boiler, that is sensitive to
> corrosion and scaling.
>
> Which water is best used with that machine? Tap, mineral, filtered?
>
> thanks a lot..
>
> Yaron

Mineral is regarded as a desirable part of the collective taste,
versus a distilled/filtered water without minerals. I use tap,
though, and forgo imported 150,000-year-old water made from the ice
age of icebergs I did, though, pull the dispersal screen after my
first few weeks to find dark coffee residue that required cleaning
from the boiler plate and hidden side of the screen. It's used
something along a regular bases just a few times a day. Orange and
brown spots on the aluminum also had reacted to chemicals in the
water, which largely cleaned up with a small steel wire brush. It may
have had prior reactions when received new -- seems I recall noticing
aluminum reaction traces without usage when I took the screen off and
machine apart to inspect the unit out of the box new. I did a quick
take on cleaning solvents sold intended for the espresso machine,
purported with high endorsements as suitable for an aluminum boiler.
They exist. Better yet, might be simply to take the machine's boiler
down for an inspection inside. I ran a very light lemon concentrate
at 1:5 for water solution through and left to set up 8 hours, last
night, after my first month use. Expect I'll probably continue the
practice every couple of months. Partial to them as good for general
ailments -- lemon and limes. I also regularly bake with citrus added
into breads (with salt to compound taste for neutralizing agent,
besides toughening the a set from yeast grown on honey).



 
Date: 05 May 2007 02:19:20
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use
kramerica <y.avramov@gmail.com > wrote:



 
Date: 04 May 2007 09:37:57
From: Cordovero
Subject: Re: Gaggia aluminum boiler - which water should I use
For all three waters you mentioned, it all depends on its mineral content
concentration. If the "filtered" means Brita, then you might as well take
out some of the chlorine, but it won't affect scaling, just taste. This is
my understanding.

So you have to check mineral concentrations, which can often be done by
googling your local water department's website. They have to give out the
concentration so that folks like me can set their house water softeners on
the right setting.

For my Gaggias, I used purified (reverse osmosis) water, plus a splash of
filtered tap water.

C

"kramerica" <y.avramov@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1178269153.306187.272310@e65g2000hsc.googlegroups.com...
> Hey everybody,
> As you know the Gaggias use an aluminum boiler, that is sensitive to
> corrosion and scaling.
>
> Which water is best used with that machine? Tap, mineral, filtered?
>
> thanks a lot..
>
> Yaron
>