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Date: 16 Jan 2007 21:15:49
From: =?ISO-8859-15?Q?Ren=E9_van_Sint_Annaland?=
Subject: German home roaster
Someone alerted me to this roaster:=20
http://germaninnovations.com/html/roaster.html
=20
It seems like a simple concept, a rotating mesh drum with a hot air=20
blower. Not so sure if it wouldn't smoke though, even with the "pre-
treated" beans that can come with it.

From information gathered, it will retail at 249 Euro, and the various=20
profiles can be set after the 1st crack, from light to dark roasts.

I'd guess that it could be used with normal green beans, but it will be=20
somewhat messy with all the chaff flying around, definitely an outdoors=20
roaster....

Any experiences with this unit, anyone? Comments?
--=20
Ren=E9 van Sint Annaland
www.justespresso.com




 
Date: 20 Jan 2007 07:29:31
From: stereoplegic
Subject: Re: German home roaster
shouldn't that be the norm with every roast?

>Definitely not a "set profile and forget" situation though,
>you need to watch the roast every second.



 
Date: 19 Jan 2007 09:23:28
From:
Subject: Re: German home roaster

Ren=E9 van Sint Annaland wrote:
> I wondered about that Ivo, thanks. Also when roasting, is it the chaff
> alone that creates the smoke? When roasting the polished beans don't
> they smoke at second crack?

No, the beans will begin to discharge gasses as soon as they are hotter
than 100C regardless of how much chaff they are also producing. It
begins mostly with water vapor as the beans dry and becomes more smokey
as the roast progresses. Almost all of the water is gone before 1st
crack starts. The smoke begins as an almost pleasant smell - akin to
baking bread - but begins to turn more bluish and acrid once 2nd crack
approaches.

You really need to give the process a try at least once. Get some
greens and your 'roaster' of choice and send them through from green to
charcoal. USENET will never do it justice: 1K words =3D 1 picture

Matthew



  
Date: 20 Jan 2007 09:56:23
From: =?ISO-8859-15?Q?Ren=E9_van_Sint_Annaland?=
Subject: Re: German home roaster
In article <1169227408.353477.282060@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups.com >,=20
mandtprice@gmail.com says...
> You really need to give the process a try at least once. Get some
> greens and your 'roaster' of choice and send them through from green to
> charcoal. USENET will never do it justice: 1K words =3D 1 picture
>=20
I have tried roasting at least once :-)

I was referring to the claim made by the manufacturer of the roaster=20
that polished beans (greens with silverskin/chaff removed) don't smoke,=20
implying that the smoke is being caused by the chaff alone. I wouldn't=20
think so, but I have never tried these pre-treated green beans.

Have you?
--=20
Ren=E9 van Sint Annaland
www.justespresso.com


   
Date: 19 Jan 2007 22:37:27
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: German home roaster
>that polished beans (greens with silverskin/chaff removed) don't smoke,

The claimant has obviously never roasted SWP decaff beans. Zero chaff, lotsa
smoke.


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au




    
Date: 19 Jan 2007 18:38:21
From: notbob
Subject: Re: German home roaster
On 2007-01-19, Coffee for Connoisseurs <alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au > wrote:

> The claimant has obviously never roasted SWP decaff beans. Zero chaff, lotsa
> smoke.

Little flavor, zero body.

nb


     
Date: 20 Jan 2007 04:33:51
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: German home roaster
On Fri, 19 Jan 2007 18:38:21 -0600, notbob <notbob@nothome.com > wrote:

>On 2007-01-19, Coffee for Connoisseurs <alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au> wrote:
>
>> The claimant has obviously never roasted SWP decaff beans. Zero chaff, lotsa
>> smoke.
>
>Little flavor, zero body.
>
>nb

Some roasters are getting very good results with them.

shall


     
Date: 20 Jan 2007 02:40:49
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: German home roaster
>Little flavor, zero body.
>
>nb

Not really true. Bastards to roast (and I've never really managed a
successful popper roast) but as long as you know what you're about you can
get a pretty nice coffee. Definitely not a "set profile and forget"
situation though, you need to watch the roast every second.


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au




      
Date: 20 Jan 2007 19:46:45
From: The Other Funk
Subject: Re: German home roaster
Finding the keyboard operational
Coffee for Connoisseurs entered:

>> Little flavor, zero body.
>>
>> nb
>
> Not really true. Bastards to roast (and I've never really managed a
> successful popper roast) but as long as you know what you're about
> you can get a pretty nice coffee. Definitely not a "set profile and
> forget" situation though, you need to watch the roast every second.

I'll second what Alan said. You can get a decent cup from a SWP but time
and heat are a lot more critical.
Bob
--
--
Coffee worth staying up for - NY Times
www.moondoggiecoffee.com



   
Date: 19 Jan 2007 17:03:46
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: German home roaster

"René van Sint Annaland" <NZHumanBean@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:MPG.201bf780272741a98968e@news.individual.net...
In article <1169227408.353477.282060@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups.com >,
mandtprice@gmail.com says...
> You really need to give the process a try at least once. Get some
> greens and your 'roaster' of choice and send them through from green
> to
> charcoal. USENET will never do it justice: 1K words = 1 picture
>
I have tried roasting at least once :-)

I was referring to the claim made by the manufacturer of the roaster
that polished beans (greens with silverskin/chaff removed) don't smoke,
implying that the smoke is being caused by the chaff alone. I wouldn't
think so, but I have never tried these pre-treated green beans.

Have you?
--
René van Sint Annaland


Yes, in another way., from Swiss Imports. They used to sell 225 gram
cellophane bags (basically 8oz) polished beans for their Alpenrost.
Craig.



    
Date: 19 Jan 2007 14:18:22
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: German home roaster

"Craig Andrews" <alt.coffee@deletethis.rogers.com > wrote in message
news:51cti1F1jfeu4U1@mid.individual.net...
>
> "René van Sint Annaland" <NZHumanBean@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:MPG.201bf780272741a98968e@news.individual.net...
> In article <1169227408.353477.282060@m58g2000cwm.googlegroups.com>,
> mandtprice@gmail.com says...
> > You really need to give the process a try at least once. Get some
> > greens and your 'roaster' of choice and send them through from green
> > to
> > charcoal. USENET will never do it justice: 1K words = 1 picture
> >
> I have tried roasting at least once :-)
>
> I was referring to the claim made by the manufacturer of the roaster
> that polished beans (greens with silverskin/chaff removed) don't smoke,
> implying that the smoke is being caused by the chaff alone. I wouldn't
> think so, but I have never tried these pre-treated green beans.
>
> Have you?
> --
> René van Sint Annaland
>
>
> Yes, in another way., from Swiss Imports. They used to sell 225 gram
> cellophane bags (basically 8oz) polished beans for their Alpenrost.
> Craig.
>
and?...




 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 10:53:08
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: German home roaster

>"René van Sint Annaland" <NZHumanBean@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>news:MPG.2017509e3315b17a98968c@news.individual.net...
>Someone alerted me to this roaster:
>http://germaninnovations.com/html/roaster.html

Also they seem to suggest a risk of fire here
http://www.toomuchcoffee.com/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=printview&t=996&st
art=0&sid=01e85b18e0aae4926f495d6f627ec884
if the special "dechaffed beans" aren't used.

Johnny





  
Date: 16 Jan 2007 15:40:44
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: German home roaster
When heat gun roasting, every once in a while some chaff really will catch
fire and drift off. I live in soggy PA where starting a fire outdoors even
if you want to is no easy chore, but I could see that in a dry climate or
indoors you wouldn't want to heat gun roast (and that's what this thing
basically is) in an area where there was any flammable tinder nearby. Plus
this particular roaster seems to have a chamber in the back of the drum
where the chaff might become trapped and accumulate and perhaps provide its
own tinder.


"Johnny" <removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:_99rh.824$G6.590@newsfe08.phx...
>
>>"René van Sint Annaland" <NZHumanBean@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>news:MPG.2017509e3315b17a98968c@news.individual.net...
>>Someone alerted me to this roaster:
>>http://germaninnovations.com/html/roaster.html
>
> Also they seem to suggest a risk of fire here
> http://www.toomuchcoffee.com/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=printview&t=996&st
> art=0&sid=01e85b18e0aae4926f495d6f627ec884
> if the special "dechaffed beans" aren't used.
>
> Johnny
>
>
>




   
Date: 18 Jan 2007 11:46:23
From: Ivo van der Putten
Subject: Re: German home roaster

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > schreef in bericht
news:loqdnWNX1fPQpTDYnZ2dnUVZ_h63nZ2d@comcast.com...
> When heat gun roasting, every once in a while some chaff really will catch
> fire and drift off. I live in soggy PA where starting a fire outdoors
> even if you want to is no easy chore, but I could see that in a dry
> climate or indoors you wouldn't want to heat gun roast (and that's what
> this thing basically is) in an area where there was any flammable tinder
> nearby. Plus this particular roaster seems to have a chamber in the back
> of the drum where the chaff might become trapped and accumulate and
> perhaps provide its own tinder.
>
>
> "Johnny" <removethis.huuanito@hotmail.com> wrote in message
> news:_99rh.824$G6.590@newsfe08.phx...
>>
>>>"René van Sint Annaland" <NZHumanBean@hotmail.com> wrote in message
>>>news:MPG.2017509e3315b17a98968c@news.individual.net...
>>>Someone alerted me to this roaster:
>>>http://germaninnovations.com/html/roaster.html
>>
>> Also they seem to suggest a risk of fire here
>> http://www.toomuchcoffee.com/index.php?name=PNphpBB2&file=printview&t=996&st
>> art=0&sid=01e85b18e0aae4926f495d6f627ec884
>> if the special "dechaffed beans" aren't used.
>>
>> Johnny
>>
>>
>>
>
>

Apart from othe reks on the roaster made earlier, polished beans, good
roasting results are not easy to obtain.
A far cheaper and better roasting machine is the I-Roast.




    
Date: 19 Jan 2007 12:59:25
From: =?ISO-8859-15?Q?Ren=E9_van_Sint_Annaland?=
Subject: Re: German home roaster
In article <eec23$45af5000$d55dbf05$9140@news.chello.nl >,=20
ivdp@ivanderputten.nl says...
>=20

>=20
> Apart from othe reks on the roaster made earlier, polished beans, good=
=20
> roasting results are not easy to obtain.
> A far cheaper and better roasting machine is the I-Roast.
>=20
I wondered about that Ivo, thanks. Also when roasting, is it the chaff=20
alone that creates the smoke? When roasting the polished beans don't=20
they smoke at second crack?

Heard you have some truly bad weather, a Swedish customer mentioned=20
their warm winter and our summer has been very poor as someone mentioned=20
before.

Perhaps it is time that we roast without heat and smoke?
--=20
Ren=E9 van Sint Annaland
www.justespresso.com


 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 10:48:34
From: Johnny
Subject: Re: German home roaster

"René van Sint Annaland" <NZHumanBean@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:MPG.2017509e3315b17a98968c@news.individual.net...
Someone alerted me to this roaster:
http://germaninnovations.com/html/roaster.html

It seems like a simple concept, a rotating mesh drum with a hot air
blower. Not so sure if it wouldn't smoke though, even with the "pre-
treated" beans that can come with it.

From information gathered, it will retail at 249 Euro, and the various
profiles can be set after the 1st crack, from light to dark roasts.

I'd guess that it could be used with normal green beans, but it will be
somewhat messy with all the chaff flying around, definitely an outdoors
roaster....

Any experiences with this unit, anyone? Comments?
--
René van Sint Annaland
www.justespresso.com

-------------------

Hi René,

there was a brief discussion on the SM list a couple of years ago about this
roaster but that discussion has been lost from the archives at themeyers.org
however I found it from another source as below, the link they give has it
at E179:

Subject:+Rostmeister heatgun style roaster
From: "Ming Wang"
Date: Sun, 2 Jan 2005 18:45:24 -0000
Heya, only third or so post on the list. I'm in Ireland and on one of the
european coffee forums someone mentioned the rostmeister, it's a german made
machine which resembles a heatgun and drum roaster combined. Bit on the
plastic side but very pleasing asthetically! Roasts a 300g batch in 10-18
minutes apparently. Retails for E250 but I've seen it online for E190. Just
thought I'd mention it.

Its website is http://www.dieckmann-aroma-kaffee.de and click the fourth
menu option - unser rostmeister.
--------
Date: Sun, 2 Jan 2005 14:14:24 -0500

I don't understand German and, no doubt, at least some of the other
list members find themselves in the same situation.

Can you tell us any more about the Rostmeister and what's being said
about it on the European forum? Does it have a cool cycle? Can it be
stopped manually? Does the drum turn by motor or simply by the force of
the air? Chaff collection? What are people saying about the quality of
the roasts? The build quality of the roaster? Is there a 110V version?
(Perhaps not.) Etc., etc.

-----------
Date: Sun, 2 Jan 2005 14:28:28 -0500

I notice that it won a design award. I'm not surprised. It seems to use the
guts (blower and heating element) from a heat gun. The drum has a separate
gearmotor drive. Nice idea, should give us homebuilders some ideas!

Notice that the housing is a heat deflector scoop. The heat gun blows on the
bottom half of the drum. Hot air moves under and around the drum exiting
after 180° of rotation. I imagine it blows chaff all over the place!

The text is mostly ad-speak, but says it has 7 roasting programs, 2 for
espresso. I can't tell if it is time or heat that determines end of roast,
but the text suggests a timer. 300g isn't a small batch for a home
appliance. The PDF has more information: 230V/50Hz, 2000W

Dan
-----------------------
Date: Sun, 2 Jan 2005 14:42:28 -0500

According to a thread on CoffeeGeek (I didn't save the URL but it's
easy enough to find by googling "rostmeister") there's a timer that you
start at the beginning of 1st crack.

John Blumel
--------------
Date: Sun, 2 Jan 2005 14:55:55 -0500

I read somewhere on the site that the typical range is 9 to 14
minutes. I couldn't make out anything about temperature ranges.
Sue
-------------


btw There doesn't seem to be any reference to it on CG.

Johnny
looks a bit cool down there for this time of year
http://www.wunderground.com/global/stations/93546.html




 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 07:56:43
From:
Subject: Re: German home roaster

Ren=E9 van Sint Annaland wrote:
> I'd guess that it could be used with normal green beans, but it will be
> somewhat messy with all the chaff flying around, definitely an outdoors
> roaster....
>
> Any experiences with this unit, anyone? Comments?

Something like this comes around at least once a year. The thinking
always goes like this: "WOW, coffee roasting would be so much nicer if
it weren't for all that smoke and chaff!" This style of roaster
depends on being fed polished beans - i.e. ones that have had the chaff
removed mechanically. My reaction to that is like buying a car that
can only be driven on perfectly smooth roads because a suspension would
be so much effort and complexity. To buy one of these is to lock
oneself into only buying greens from the same company because none of
the 'real' green suppliers sells these polished greens.

Chaff and smoke are a part of the roast. Any roaster that can't
survive both is broken as designed. Most of the home roasters just let
the smoke blow away, but some do try to wash it through a catalytic
converter first. I can't think of any purpose commercial roaster,
either home or pro, that doesn't have a chaff collector. Most of the
home-built machines just let it blow away/around.

Because chaff will follow the air stream inside this roaster, chaff
will collect in the exhaust and overheat the machine. This will, from
least worrisome to most, defeat the machines ability to control the
roast, overheat the machine, destroy the machine or catch fire.

Bottom line: get a different roaster by buying something else or
building your own.

Matthew



  
Date:
From:
Subject:


 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 02:05:55
From: Plaidmoon
Subject: Re: German home roaster

Ren=E9 van Sint Annaland wrote:
> Someone alerted me to this roaster:
> http://germaninnovations.com/html/roaster.html
>
> It seems like a simple concept, a rotating mesh drum with a hot air
> blower. Not so sure if it wouldn't smoke though, even with the "pre-
> treated" beans that can come with it.
>
> From information gathered, it will retail at 249 Euro, and the various
> profiles can be set after the 1st crack, from light to dark roasts.
>
> I'd guess that it could be used with normal green beans, but it will be
> somewhat messy with all the chaff flying around, definitely an outdoors
> roaster....
>
> Any experiences with this unit, anyone? Comments?

My first reaction was similar to yours. "Oh! That's so simple! A heat
gun pointed at a rotating mesh drum. Why didn't I think of that?"

It should be mechanically reliable as there's nothing very complicated
there (except maybe for the electronics of the roast profiler). I'd
hope there would be some way of manually controlling the roaster
yourself. I have a few small concerns but over all it looks good to me.
I would have put a few vanes in the drum to agitate the beans. I also
hope that the mesh is small enough that small beans wouldn't get stuck
in it. It's definitely an outdoor roaster due to the lack of any
visible smoke or chaff control.

I see that it is rated at 2300 watts. I'm not an electrician, but I'd
wonder if you can run an appliance that heavy duty on 110 V in the US.
I don't recall ever seeing an appliance rated that high over here.

249 Euros is more than I'd be likely to pay but if the reviews and
early user reports were good, I'd consider it.

Plaidmoon



  
Date: 16 Jan 2007 12:02:29
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: German home roaster
Short answer is no. Typical circuits in US are 15 amps @ 120V = 1800W max
and for a safety cushion appliances typically max out at a little less. 20
amp circuits (which could do 2300W and more) are actually fairly common
nowadays (accept special 20A plug with 1 horizontal prong as well as usual
plugs w/ 2 vertical prongs) but since they aren't present in every home few
appliance makers design appliances that require them.

"Plaidmoon" <plaidmoon@hotmail.com > wrote in message
news:1168941954.869324.163060@a75g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...


I see that it is rated at 2300 watts. I'm not an electrician, but I'd
wonder if you can run an appliance that heavy duty on 110 V in the US.
I don't recall ever seeing an appliance rated that high over here.