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Date: 12 Oct 2006 15:11:00
From: Steve
Subject: Has anyone seen Black Gold yet?
Any comments on the movie or it's theme?




 
Date: 14 Oct 2006 19:59:43
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Has anyone seen Black Gold yet?
karlseidel wrote:

Haven't seen it, but looks in keeping with a fair share of British
documentary exports. Picked up by California Newsreel, one might expect
to find it within a narrow educational spectra broadcast on satellite
streams. Appears to centre within Meskela's cooperative
representatives in southern Ethiopia, though the title suggests how
nice it might be to see a broader inclusion of indigenous coffee
producers, broadly representative of coffee as educational experiences
goes, over a focus given its indigents. Ethiopia may well have
embodied in Meskela an economic and political effect in some sense the
film is intended to empower, as agents to means a greater commodities
presence exact. But, for that reason, it's likely to limit a scope for
potential programme staging in supplanting temporal factors Ethiopia, I
agree, need resolve to adapt to a lucrative keting position.



 
Date: 14 Oct 2006 09:57:12
From: karlseidel
Subject: Re: Has anyone seen Black Gold yet?
I can't call this film great - pretty perhaps, politically interesting,
socially aware, but it's not a "great film" because it doesn't embrace
the obvious - that the coffee-drinking world at large doesn't know or
care about the plight of African farmers any more than it cares about
where oil comes from - much less the qualitative differences! It's
slanted because it's bent on making a statement about capitalist
inequity. To me the film seems naive, and although you've just got to
love the films featured player TADESSE MESKELA from the Oromia Coffee
Farmers Co-operative Union, he too seems to be naive. I have to say
that if he thinks his time and effort and the money it takes to get him
to the UN and to cast his world-class coffee in the light of the the
"C" ket is well-spent he is definitely naive. That money is better
spent on keting the brilliant coffees of his people to people who
are pre-disposed to enjoy them - small roasters - not big roasters,
certainly not conglomerates like SB's and Kraft and other folks who
follow the "C" price. They're simply not his target client. What
bothers me is that Tadesse and other people who act as agents and
represent other peoples financial concerns would benefit greatly from
reading any book on keting and proceeding with a plan - identify
their target ket and constantly work towards keting their product
to that target ket.

The other thing that is never addressed in this film is that the target
ket (in this case roasters) cup coffees daily. If a coffee is great
it will be selected because it is great. But that's not the issue. The
issue is to get that coffee into the hands of the right buyers and
roasters. This is the real issue here because big roasters don't
generally care about taste quality - they're mostly interested in the
cost of coffee and if it's a good blender. They're mostly concerned
with the things big companies are concerned about: ket segmentation,
storage and distribution - not taste quality and certainly not the
subtleties found in Ethiopian Sidamo! In addition to that African
coffees are generally uneven in size. And they're mostly unwashed. And
they contain rocks and other undesirable matter which discourages
roasters - especially big roasters from making the extra effort to
roast them. More trouble = more time = more money to roast and process.

If the films directors or producers want to blame anyone for this
inequity it would be pretty easy to just go to the source - the farmers
and their agents. It's not easy for farmers to think about keting
because they're farmers and they're busy farming. It's just necessary.
And that's why coffee corporations, brokers, agents and Wall Street
traders benefit - because the work of keting and distribution is
fraught with peril: money spent not knowing what will happen in the
ket, testing, research, time it takes to get product to ket,
distribution concerns, consumer surveys, and everything else it takes
to get a product into your hands. No one person can take that risk.
Therefore agents and groups and conglomerates do. It's the way of the
world. No one should take this personally!

In my opinion, African coffees are some of the best-tasting coffees in
the world - but that doesn't mean most coffee drinkers care about that.
Nope. Most coffee drinkers in the world drink spray-dried coffee that
has had the aroma added back in after the spray drying has been done
and is now found in convenient jars on their grocery shelves. Most
people drink spray-dried coffee because it's cheap and it's soluble -
and easy to prepare, convenient and doesn't require fancy machines and
grinders - just hot water and a cup!

So, in sumy, I'll go on paying top dollar for great African coffees
and my customers will buy the stuff because I recommended it to them.
But I am under no illusions that "the best" coffees will get to ket
or that if they do find their way to ket consumers will snap them
off the grocery store shelves. That's certainly something to hope for
but I'm not holding my breath. Black Gold is a good film because it
draws consumers awareness "buds" to the source of great coffee -
Ethiopia. But it's not a great film because it doesn't offer any real
hope or at the very least a "call to action" which is needed. That call
to action must always be to ket to the people who recognize the
value and want that thing. Otherwise it will always be a good idea but
not necessarily a product fetching its real value in the ketplace.

Brent wrote:
> Yeah, it's a great film.
>
> Don't recall seeing k on it, will have to have a closer look this weekend
> :)
>
> My thoughts are that it covers a lot of issues relating to trade in general,
> with a focus on coffee. It doesn't answer questions, doesn't cover
> everything, but there is still a lot in it.
>
> About the only punch is the interview with a *$ employee, and the ensuing
> cut. And that is the style of the film - it isn't especially negative, it
> allows you to draw your own conclusions.
>
> I would recommend you watch it if you get the opportunity - when people hear
> I am into coffee in the real world, Black Gold keeps coming up, and
> questions about it are plenty from non coffee types.
>
> Brent
>
>
>
> >>Any comments on the movie or it's theme?
> >
> > k P had a bit on one of his Podcasts about the movie. He did
> > comment, as did Beata, on the focus. Try to get that coffee geek
> > podcast.
> >
> > I do think k also commented he had a walk-on part but not enough of
> > a presence to even get free tickets:).
> >
> > aloha,
> > Cea
> > --smithfarms.com
> > farmers of pure kona
> > roast beans to kona to email



  
Date: 16 Oct 2006 12:06:40
From: Brent
Subject: Re: Has anyone seen Black Gold yet?
Watch it again, and think another product other than coffee.

The film in my mind is great because it doesn't say look "problem" look
"answer", hell there are problems that lie within some answers.

The problems aren't restricted to just coffee, so while the film looks at
the work of Tadesse from Oromia, who to my knowledge does try and set up
direct relationships to improve returns to farmers.

Tadesse even alludes to other products (bananas specifically) as another
product having problems.

If the film had all the answers, I don't think it would work...

(I watched it again last night, still didn't see k)

Brent

>I can't call this film great - pretty perhaps, politically interesting,
> socially aware, but it's not a "great film" because it doesn't embrace
> the obvious - that the coffee-drinking world at large doesn't know or
> care about the plight of African farmers any more than it cares about
> where oil comes from - much less the qualitative differences! It's
> slanted because it's bent on making a statement about capitalist
> inequity. To me the film seems naive, and although you've just got to
> love the films featured player TADESSE MESKELA from the Oromia Coffee
> Farmers Co-operative Union, he too seems to be naive. I have to say
> that if he thinks his time and effort and the money it takes to get him
> to the UN and to cast his world-class coffee in the light of the the
> "C" ket is well-spent he is definitely naive. That money is better
> spent on keting the brilliant coffees of his people to people who
> are pre-disposed to enjoy them - small roasters - not big roasters,
> certainly not conglomerates like SB's and Kraft and other folks who
> follow the "C" price. They're simply not his target client. What
> bothers me is that Tadesse and other people who act as agents and
> represent other peoples financial concerns would benefit greatly from
> reading any book on keting and proceeding with a plan - identify
> their target ket and constantly work towards keting their product
> to that target ket.
>
> The other thing that is never addressed in this film is that the target
> ket (in this case roasters) cup coffees daily. If a coffee is great
> it will be selected because it is great. But that's not the issue. The
> issue is to get that coffee into the hands of the right buyers and
> roasters. This is the real issue here because big roasters don't
> generally care about taste quality - they're mostly interested in the
> cost of coffee and if it's a good blender. They're mostly concerned
> with the things big companies are concerned about: ket segmentation,
> storage and distribution - not taste quality and certainly not the
> subtleties found in Ethiopian Sidamo! In addition to that African
> coffees are generally uneven in size. And they're mostly unwashed. And
> they contain rocks and other undesirable matter which discourages
> roasters - especially big roasters from making the extra effort to
> roast them. More trouble = more time = more money to roast and process.
>
> If the films directors or producers want to blame anyone for this
> inequity it would be pretty easy to just go to the source - the farmers
> and their agents. It's not easy for farmers to think about keting
> because they're farmers and they're busy farming. It's just necessary.
> And that's why coffee corporations, brokers, agents and Wall Street
> traders benefit - because the work of keting and distribution is
> fraught with peril: money spent not knowing what will happen in the
> ket, testing, research, time it takes to get product to ket,
> distribution concerns, consumer surveys, and everything else it takes
> to get a product into your hands. No one person can take that risk.
> Therefore agents and groups and conglomerates do. It's the way of the
> world. No one should take this personally!
>
> In my opinion, African coffees are some of the best-tasting coffees in
> the world - but that doesn't mean most coffee drinkers care about that.
> Nope. Most coffee drinkers in the world drink spray-dried coffee that
> has had the aroma added back in after the spray drying has been done
> and is now found in convenient jars on their grocery shelves. Most
> people drink spray-dried coffee because it's cheap and it's soluble -
> and easy to prepare, convenient and doesn't require fancy machines and
> grinders - just hot water and a cup!
>
> So, in sumy, I'll go on paying top dollar for great African coffees
> and my customers will buy the stuff because I recommended it to them.
> But I am under no illusions that "the best" coffees will get to ket
> or that if they do find their way to ket consumers will snap them
> off the grocery store shelves. That's certainly something to hope for
> but I'm not holding my breath. Black Gold is a good film because it
> draws consumers awareness "buds" to the source of great coffee -
> Ethiopia. But it's not a great film because it doesn't offer any real
> hope or at the very least a "call to action" which is needed. That call
> to action must always be to ket to the people who recognize the
> value and want that thing. Otherwise it will always be a good idea but
> not necessarily a product fetching its real value in the ketplace.
>
> Brent wrote:
>> Yeah, it's a great film.
>>
>> Don't recall seeing k on it, will have to have a closer look this
>> weekend
>> :)
>>
>> My thoughts are that it covers a lot of issues relating to trade in
>> general,
>> with a focus on coffee. It doesn't answer questions, doesn't cover
>> everything, but there is still a lot in it.
>>
>> About the only punch is the interview with a *$ employee, and the ensuing
>> cut. And that is the style of the film - it isn't especially negative, it
>> allows you to draw your own conclusions.
>>
>> I would recommend you watch it if you get the opportunity - when people
>> hear
>> I am into coffee in the real world, Black Gold keeps coming up, and
>> questions about it are plenty from non coffee types.
>>
>> Brent
>>
>>
>>
>> >>Any comments on the movie or it's theme?
>> >
>> > k P had a bit on one of his Podcasts about the movie. He did
>> > comment, as did Beata, on the focus. Try to get that coffee geek
>> > podcast.
>> >
>> > I do think k also commented he had a walk-on part but not enough of
>> > a presence to even get free tickets:).
>> >
>> > aloha,
>> > Cea
>> > --smithfarms.com
>> > farmers of pure kona
>> > roast beans to kona to email
>




 
Date: 12 Oct 2006 06:03:58
From:
Subject: Re: Has anyone seen Black Gold yet?
On Thu, 12 Oct 2006 15:11:00 GMT, Steve <not@use.net > wrote:

>Any comments on the movie or it's theme?

k P had a bit on one of his Podcasts about the movie. He did
comment, as did Beata, on the focus. Try to get that coffee geek
podcast.

I do think k also commented he had a walk-on part but not enough of
a presence to even get free tickets:).

aloha,
Cea
--smithfarms.com
farmers of pure kona
roast beans to kona to email


  
Date: 13 Oct 2006 09:02:15
From: Brent
Subject: Re: Has anyone seen Black Gold yet?
Yeah, it's a great film.

Don't recall seeing k on it, will have to have a closer look this weekend
:)

My thoughts are that it covers a lot of issues relating to trade in general,
with a focus on coffee. It doesn't answer questions, doesn't cover
everything, but there is still a lot in it.

About the only punch is the interview with a *$ employee, and the ensuing
cut. And that is the style of the film - it isn't especially negative, it
allows you to draw your own conclusions.

I would recommend you watch it if you get the opportunity - when people hear
I am into coffee in the real world, Black Gold keeps coming up, and
questions about it are plenty from non coffee types.

Brent



>>Any comments on the movie or it's theme?
>
> k P had a bit on one of his Podcasts about the movie. He did
> comment, as did Beata, on the focus. Try to get that coffee geek
> podcast.
>
> I do think k also commented he had a walk-on part but not enough of
> a presence to even get free tickets:).
>
> aloha,
> Cea
> --smithfarms.com
> farmers of pure kona
> roast beans to kona to email