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Date: 10 Jan 2007 04:32:17
From:
Subject: How to make the best perked coffee?
After years of using Braun coffeemakers, I decided to buy myself a
Farberware stove top percolator. Every time I went to my mom's house, I
noticed the electric perked coffee (Brown Gold) would taste much better
than that made in my coffeemaker.

As I expected, even the Folger's Columbian perked I made today had a
cleaner taste than the coffeemaker drip I was used to.

Hopefully, some of you can give me some advice regarding the following:

1) How long should I allow the coffee to perk for once it starts (for lack
of a better term) boiling or bubbling to the glass? Assume it's a 4 cup
brew.

2) Can I use coffee filters so that I can just throw the grinds right out?

3) What's the best superket coffee for percolators? I've always
thought tinson's and Brown Gold (both made by Mother Parker) seem to
taste the best. I just can't afford bags of Green Mountain or Starbucks at
this point. I don't know if the Dunkin' Donuts house brand is as weak as
their coffee tastes in their chain stores, but I've never tried it.


4) Is it ok to grind fresh beans in my blender?
I've done it in the past and have gotten good results.


I know some of you are coffee mavens and consider it abhorent to drink
perked coffee, but I don't have the time or money to spend on it in the
morning. To me, stove top perked is a step about drip coffeemakers, but
not as good as electric percolators.


PS - As my name suggests, what did happen to Yuban. It used to have such a
full, fruity flavor 25+ years ago.








 
Date: 13 Jan 2007 07:52:12
From: Mathew Hargreaves
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Hello Donald,

I would definately agree with not using open water from a
refrigerator.
When the alcohol percolators were the big thing while early
electrics were coming on the ket, the cold water was brought to a
boil on the wood or gas stove. So in that period the water would (might)
have been fresh for that purpose.
The ease of automatic percolators removes the thinking process
about the goal for the end product for consumption, where better quality
can be had. Laziness on most user's part adds to the problem. If using
an older alcohol percolator or vacuum coffee maker like a Cona,
preheating cold water WILL be more work than people will want to do. I
do not think that using hot water, either from a tank, or from an
instant water heater, with good coffee beans will alter the taste of
good beans very much. At least to the average drinker. A cupper probably
would decern the nuance. I for one would not due a lack of that
training.
If hot water tank water is used but with stale or ground canned
coffee, who would ever know the difference. :-)
I have run some of the 1908 to 1925 percolators for the fun of
trying them out. Doing so allowed me to taste the difference in the
finished beverage. This was using the same beans in a perk and a Silex
vacpot. It was the taste difference that comes from the percolator
extraction that I wanted to pass over to the original poster. If timed
right, an passable drink can be had. Not good, nor great. Unfortunately,
more of the bitterness will be present too. The total immersion in a
vacpot is still the best method to my taste.

Sincerely, Mathew Hargreaves


i840coffee@optonline.net wrote:
>
> Mathew has an interesting idea about starting with hot water. This
> does cut brew ready-time but at a price. Cold water from the tap is
> always fresh as the water, in most cities and towns, is always moving
> from source in the lines beneath the streets while hot water is from an
> indirect source often a water heater where it may have been sitting for
> w while going stale and picking up odors from sediment in the tank.
> For this reason I also suggest avoiding water that has been in an open
> bottle in the refrigerator as the water will have lost some of its
> oxygen (see the bubbles on the bottle sides) causing the resulting
> beverage to taste flat. It may have picked up food odors too.
>
> -Donald Schoenholt


 
Date: 12 Jan 2007 22:27:55
From:
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Mathew has an interesting idea about starting with hot water. This
does cut brew ready-time but at a price. Cold water from the tap is
always fresh as the water, in most cities and towns, is always moving
from source in the lines beneath the streets while hot water is from an
indirect source often a water heater where it may have been sitting for
w while going stale and picking up odors from sediment in the tank.
For this reason I also suggest avoiding water that has been in an open
bottle in the refrigerator as the water will have lost some of its
oxygen (see the bubbles on the bottle sides) causing the resulting
beverage to taste flat. It may have picked up food odors too.

-Donald Schoenholt



 
Date: 11 Jan 2007 17:10:54
From: Fandango .
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
For the last year I've been using a Bodum 8 cup glass Brazil press and
I'm delighted with it, you can get 1 for under $20 online. A few months
ago I cleaned up my parents old electric percolator and must say I liked
the coffee it made quite well tho it's very slow. I think I'd much
rather have percolator coffee than paper drip coffee.



  
Date: 12 Jan 2007 10:10:12
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
I'd almost agree w. you if you are talking about some electric autodrips -
they drip lukewarm water over the coffee and then burn it on the hotplate.
Not clear that this is really an improvement over the bad old days of percs
that Mr. Coffee banished. BUT, I'd put my Melitta pourover ahead of a perc
any day.



"Fandango ." <Matt308@webtv.net > wrote in message
news:15698-45A6B5EE-10@asg-storefull-3112.bay.webtv.net...
I think I'd much
> rather have percolator coffee than paper drip coffee.
>




 
Date: 10 Jan 2007 21:18:51
From:
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?

A serious question deserves a straightforward response. I don't care
for percolators , but you can make a decent cup of coffee in one if you
follow the following directions.

1) Use a stainless steel or glass percolator. Avoid aluminum.

2) For each serving use two tablespoons of reasonably coarse regular
roast ground coffee for each 6-ounces of fresh cold water per serving.
No need to add "one for the pot".

3) Time percolator action to exactly eight minutes from first blip in
the glass bubble on the pot lid.

4) Remove pot from heat immediately after brew cycle is finished.
Remove and empty brew basket right away (or as soon as it is cool
enough to handle).

5) Serve right away

6) Never keep brewed coffee more than 45-minutes

5) Never reheat coffee.

Yuban, the luxury coffee brand of the old Arbuckle's Coffee Co
originally of Pittsburgh PA and later Brooklyn New York, and later the
100% Colombian brand of General Foods (now Kraft) has been reimagined
as the environmentally friendly "Rainforest Alliance" Certified
coffee of Kraft Foods. You can find out more about it at www.yuban.com



  
Date: 11 Jan 2007 17:44:50
From: Mathew Hargreaves
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Greeting again,

I agree with this but feel one change is in order. If you use hot
water instead of cold, the operation time is reduced on the heating
element. This will extend its operational life but also shorten the
brewing time. This was done when testing 1908 to 1920's electric
percolators to see if they worked.
The instructions of that period for using the alcohol heated
percolators called for the water to be heated first (on the stove) up to
boiling, then poured into the water chamber of the coffee maker. Then
the alcohol heater was lit to run the percolator pump without the week
of heating time needed with cold water.
There is no shortage of Corning glass percolators on ebay that also
use the glass pumps in them. Though not electric, they would work just
fine on a gas or electric stove.

CHEERS...Mathew

i840coffee@optonline.net wrote:
>
> A serious question deserves a straightforward response. I don't care
> for percolators , but you can make a decent cup of coffee in one if you
> follow the following directions.
>
> 1) Use a stainless steel or glass percolator. Avoid aluminum.
>
> 2) For each serving use two tablespoons of reasonably coarse regular
> roast ground coffee for each 6-ounces of fresh cold water per serving.
> No need to add "one for the pot".
>
> 3) Time percolator action to exactly eight minutes from first blip in
> the glass bubble on the pot lid.
>
> 4) Remove pot from heat immediately after brew cycle is finished.
> Remove and empty brew basket right away (or as soon as it is cool
> enough to handle).
>
> 5) Serve right away
>
> 6) Never keep brewed coffee more than 45-minutes
>
> 5) Never reheat coffee.
>
> Yuban, the luxury coffee brand of the old Arbuckle's Coffee Co
> originally of Pittsburgh PA and later Brooklyn New York, and later the
> 100% Colombian brand of General Foods (now Kraft) has been reimagined
> as the environmentally friendly "Rainforest Alliance" Certified
> coffee of Kraft Foods. You can find out more about it at www.yuban.com


  
Date: 11 Jan 2007 01:43:59
From:
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
i840coffee@optonline.net wrote in news:1168492731.107794.121120
@o58g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:

>
> A serious question deserves a straightforward response. I don't care
> for percolators , but you can make a decent cup of coffee in one if you
> follow the following directions.
>
> 1) Use a stainless steel or glass percolator. Avoid aluminum.
>
> 2) For each serving use two tablespoons of reasonably coarse regular
> roast ground coffee for each 6-ounces of fresh cold water per serving.
> No need to add "one for the pot".
>
> 3) Time percolator action to exactly eight minutes from first blip in
> the glass bubble on the pot lid.
>
> 4) Remove pot from heat immediately after brew cycle is finished.
> Remove and empty brew basket right away (or as soon as it is cool
> enough to handle).
>
> 5) Serve right away
>
> 6) Never keep brewed coffee more than 45-minutes
>
> 5) Never reheat coffee.
>
> Yuban, the luxury coffee brand of the old Arbuckle's Coffee Co
> originally of Pittsburgh PA and later Brooklyn New York, and later the
> 100% Colombian brand of General Foods (now Kraft) has been reimagined
> as the environmentally friendly "Rainforest Alliance" Certified
> coffee of Kraft Foods. You can find out more about it at www.yuban.com


Great advice. Should the percolating action (or as Pres. Bush might call
it - percolation) be timed for eight minutes regardless of the amount of
water in the pot? 4 cups s/b the same as 8 cups of water? Won't I lose
some water with all that boiling?


Thanks for the info about Yuban. There was a time when it was considered
a premium coffee. I didn't know it was an Arbuckle's brand and was once
made in Brooklyn, NY. It reminds me of the smell of the old "Chuck Full
of Nuts" chain of restaurants, one of which was in Brooklyn.
My mom would take me in there while she had her cup of java with their
famous pound cake.



   
Date: 12 Jan 2007 03:57:40
From: Brian Colwell
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?

<yubanUsed2bgood@whathappened2Yuban.org > wrote in message
news:kaydnZoxyPgidzjYnZ2dnUVZ_s-rnZ2d@giganews.com...
> i840coffee@optonline.net wrote in news:1168492731.107794.121120
> @o58g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:
>
>>
>> A serious question deserves a straightforward response. I don't care
>> for percolators , but you can make a decent cup of coffee in one if you
>> follow the following directions.
>>
>> 1) Use a stainless steel or glass percolator. Avoid aluminum.
>>
>> 2) For each serving use two tablespoons of reasonably coarse regular
>> roast ground coffee for each 6-ounces of fresh cold water per serving.
>> No need to add "one for the pot".
>>
>> 3) Time percolator action to exactly eight minutes from first blip in
>> the glass bubble on the pot lid.
>>
>> 4) Remove pot from heat immediately after brew cycle is finished.
>> Remove and empty brew basket right away (or as soon as it is cool
>> enough to handle).
>>
>> 5) Serve right away
>>
>> 6) Never keep brewed coffee more than 45-minutes
>>
>> 5) Never reheat coffee.
>>
>> Yuban, the luxury coffee brand of the old Arbuckle's Coffee Co
>> originally of Pittsburgh PA and later Brooklyn New York, and later the
>> 100% Colombian brand of General Foods (now Kraft) has been reimagined
>> as the environmentally friendly "Rainforest Alliance" Certified
>> coffee of Kraft Foods. You can find out more about it at www.yuban.com
>
>
> Great advice. Should the percolating action (or as Pres. Bush might call
> it - percolation) be timed for eight minutes regardless of the amount of
> water in the pot? 4 cups s/b the same as 8 cups of water? Won't I lose
> some water with all that boiling?
>
>
> Thanks for the info about Yuban. There was a time when it was considered
> a premium coffee. I didn't know it was an Arbuckle's brand and was once
> made in Brooklyn, NY. It reminds me of the smell of the old "Chuck Full
> of Nuts" chain of restaurants, one of which was in Brooklyn.
> My mom would take me in there while she had her cup of java with their
> famous pound cake.
>
There are electric percolators, that have a timed perc cycle based on the
amount of water in the unit, then it goes into a
heated standby mode.

BMC




    
Date: 12 Jan 2007 06:43:16
From: Lavarock
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Brian Colwell wrote:
> <yubanUsed2bgood@whathappened2Yuban.org> wrote in message
> news:kaydnZoxyPgidzjYnZ2dnUVZ_s-rnZ2d@giganews.com...
>> i840coffee@optonline.net wrote in news:1168492731.107794.121120
>> @o58g2000hsb.googlegroups.com:
>>
>>> A serious question deserves a straightforward response. I don't care
>>> for percolators , but you can make a decent cup of coffee in one if you
>>> follow the following directions.
>>>
It is easier than that (he says with a smile).

It only took them 12 minutes to explain it here... every step so precise
it puts a tea ceremony to shame.

http://www.archive.org/details/ThisisCo1961

Best to download it

--

They said that someone has to live in Hawaii ad I raised my hand first!


 
Date: 10 Jan 2007 21:24:16
From: Mike Hartigan
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Since I find percolated coffee to be among the most wretched
beverages ever devised by man, I won't try to offer any helpful
suggestions on this topic. Suffice it to say that taste is highly
subjective and if perked coffee is what you like, then perked coffee
is, indeed, what you should be drinking.

That said, I must add that my recollections from years gone by have
convinced me that there is nothing quite like the heavenly aroma of
perked coffee! I've actually considered brewing a pot of inexpensive
coffee in the percolator while serving my guests from the drip
brewer.

--
-Mike


 
Date: 11 Jan 2007 01:25:17
From: Mathew Hargreaves
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Percolated coffee can be wretched stuff IF you run the coffee maker
too long. Using an urn version allows you to draw off little samples
while it is brewing. This way you can determine the strength and
bitterness level as the perking proceeds. By timing this process you can
figure out the optimum brewing time.
Percolated coffee tends to capture the brighter high notes from the
coffee. It will not give the deeper tones that come from an immersion
brewer such as a vacuum coffee maker. Full immersion brewing for 90
seconds to two minutes will release the valuable flavor elements before
there is a high release of the bitter tannen oils.
So keep in mind that the best results will still be had only if you
use fresh whole beans and grind them properly just before brewing.

CHEERS...Mathew

yubanUsed2bgood@whathappened2Yuban.org wrote:
>
> After years of using Braun coffeemakers, I decided to buy myself a
> Farberware stove top percolator. Every time I went to my mom's house, I
> noticed the electric perked coffee (Brown Gold) would taste much better
> than that made in my coffeemaker.
>
> As I expected, even the Folger's Columbian perked I made today had a
> cleaner taste than the coffeemaker drip I was used to.
>
> Hopefully, some of you can give me some advice regarding the following:
>
> 1) How long should I allow the coffee to perk for once it starts (for lack
> of a better term) boiling or bubbling to the glass? Assume it's a 4 cup
> brew.
>
> 2) Can I use coffee filters so that I can just throw the grinds right out?
>
> 3) What's the best superket coffee for percolators? I've always
> thought tinson's and Brown Gold (both made by Mother Parker) seem to
> taste the best. I just can't afford bags of Green Mountain or Starbucks at
> this point. I don't know if the Dunkin' Donuts house brand is as weak as
> their coffee tastes in their chain stores, but I've never tried it.
>
> 4) Is it ok to grind fresh beans in my blender?
> I've done it in the past and have gotten good results.
>
> I know some of you are coffee mavens and consider it abhorent to drink
> perked coffee, but I don't have the time or money to spend on it in the
> morning. To me, stove top perked is a step about drip coffeemakers, but
> not as good as electric percolators.
>
> PS - As my name suggests, what did happen to Yuban. It used to have such a
> full, fruity flavor 25+ years ago.
>
>


  
Date: 11 Jan 2007 01:47:40
From:
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Mathew Hargreaves <mathewdh@worldnet.att.net > wrote in
news:45A5913C.7CC88FA8@worldnet.att.net:

> Percolated coffee tends to capture the brighter high notes from the
> coffee. It will not give the deeper tones that come from an immersion
> brewer such as a vacuum coffee maker. Full immersion brewing for 90
> seconds to two minutes will release the valuable flavo

Your advice is appreciated, but for goodness sake, all I want is a cup of
coffee that still tastes like coffee in the morning as a jolt to get me
moving (and my intestines cleaned out about one hour later!).


There's a funny Dennis Leary routine called, "Whatever happened to just
coffee-coffee?"


 
Date: 10 Jan 2007 13:11:11
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?

Tom wrote:
> As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on anyone
> who uses less than the best of everything so don't look for too many helpful
> suggestions other than tossing your coffeemaker in the trash.

And they also acknowledge the convention that, no matter what you say,
there are some that are going to drink and actually will continue to
like the stuff. Which also goes for the drippers -- rather than
recycle a perk of brewed water over the grinds simply continues to be
overextracted (with added hot water) is, by far, the predominate form
in consuming coffee and the most common mistake espresso makers
practice. It's what they want in the former instance and that's all the
why. Yesterday, a friend came by and said he'd run out of coffee at
his home. A regular, we like to go out and about once a week, but
usually I prepare us a single cup of espresso (latte proper if not a
facsimile thereof). If the beans are notable, I pop the top and stick
them under his nose and say smell beforehand. Anyway, nothing new, he
loves the way I've learned espresso, except that yesterday he's in
really bad shape and starts acting different, slamming them down, one
right after another, fast as I can pull. Damnsam, good stuff, eh?
Third one, he forms the opinion he's adequately buzzed, furthermore, at
a precise comparable amount he mixes and drinks at 10 cups from a
dripper. An unprecedented admission, since he's still under the
opinion my coffee is chockfull of caffeine. Surmising, best I can
figure, that since he drinks coffee for a "weaker addition" of grinds
(nearer the same amount I ground at three cups) over 10 cups thinly and
brewed overextracted, mine must be somehow stronger. The other thing
is he wants to space out 10 cups throughout the morning, usually while
working on various projects. That makes perfect sense. At first he
was circumspect and wary of some exaggerated sense of caffeine content.
But that's all over, and the taste of espresso his him knocked out and
down for the count -- a taste domineeringly apparent, which he'll
readily attest. Does that stop him going back rightaway to his
"spaced-out" brewed concoctions ... nope, it's the octane for his
motor, the way he runs. I don't have a problem when he hits my stuff
with something like a sugar addiction. OK, fine and nice to see. 'Till
next week, then.



 
Date: 10 Jan 2007 08:38:13
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
My grandmother used a percolator, and her cinnamon rolls were good enough to
offset the coffee. So I would second Alan's advice to get rid of it.
Besides the [IMO] terrible taste, there is the matter of the extra caffein
produced by this process. Your arteries will not appreciate it [although my
grandfather thrived on it to age 88]. If you don't like drip, try a French
press for really good taste [or maybe not -- taste is relative to what you
are used to]. I would suggest vacuum brew for really good taste, but that
is time consuming -- press is quick.

<yubanUsed2bgood@whathappened2Yuban.org > wrote in message
news:37mdnfz5wtosXTnYnZ2dnUVZ_tijnZ2d@giganews.com...
> After years of using Braun coffeemakers, I decided to buy myself a
> Farberware stove top percolator. Every time I went to my mom's house, I
> noticed the electric perked coffee (Brown Gold) would taste much better
> than that made in my coffeemaker.




 
Date: 10 Jan 2007 07:20:57
From: Tom
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on anyone
who uses less than the best of everything so don't look for too many helpful
suggestions other than tossing your coffeemaker in the trash. Alan makes a
good comment about the 'plunger' as a cheap alternative to your cooker. Go
to any of the online coffee sites and look at French Presses. You can get
them at most cooking stores and department stores. Cost is around $40 for a
good sized one. They make excellent coffee quickly and with little cleanup.
Just be sure to let the boiling water to cool down a little before pouring
it into the press.
Your blender as a grinder will yield the same problems as cheap blade
grinders do, that is they 'burn' or overheat the beans as the madly whirl
away. Invest in a $40+ burr/stone grinder and you will be happy. So for
less than $100 you can upgrade your coffee experience to the next level.
Eventually you will see the incentive to take another step up closer to the
other people here.

Tom
<yubanUsed2bgood@whathappened2Yuban.org > wrote in message
news:37mdnfz5wtosXTnYnZ2dnUVZ_tijnZ2d@giganews.com...
> After years of using Braun coffeemakers, I decided to buy myself a
> Farberware stove top percolator. Every time I went to my mom's house, I
> noticed the electric perked coffee (Brown Gold) would taste much better
> than that made in my coffeemaker.
>
> As I expected, even the Folger's Columbian perked I made today had a
> cleaner taste than the coffeemaker drip I was used to.
>
> Hopefully, some of you can give me some advice regarding the following:
>
> 1) How long should I allow the coffee to perk for once it starts (for lack
> of a better term) boiling or bubbling to the glass? Assume it's a 4 cup
> brew.
>
> 2) Can I use coffee filters so that I can just throw the grinds right
> out?
>
> 3) What's the best superket coffee for percolators? I've always
> thought tinson's and Brown Gold (both made by Mother Parker) seem to
> taste the best. I just can't afford bags of Green Mountain or Starbucks
> at
> this point. I don't know if the Dunkin' Donuts house brand is as weak as
> their coffee tastes in their chain stores, but I've never tried it.
>
>
> 4) Is it ok to grind fresh beans in my blender?
> I've done it in the past and have gotten good results.
>
>
> I know some of you are coffee mavens and consider it abhorent to drink
> perked coffee, but I don't have the time or money to spend on it in the
> morning. To me, stove top perked is a step about drip coffeemakers, but
> not as good as electric percolators.
>
>
> PS - As my name suggests, what did happen to Yuban. It used to have such
> a
> full, fruity flavor 25+ years ago.
>
>
>
>




  
Date: 10 Jan 2007 20:52:02
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
>As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on anyone
>who uses less than the best of everything

Hah! I wrote that over 15 years ago, before there WAS an alt.coffee. The
advice was sound then, and still is. And I never look down on anyone who
buys real coffee (instant is another matter!), how do you think I make my
living?

Mind you, I still have a percolator I used to lend out free to coffee
customers who were selling their houses back in the early 90's.


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au




  
Date: 10 Jan 2007 14:12:11
From: Danny
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
Tom wrote:
> As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on anyone
> who uses less than the best of everything so don't look for too many helpful
> suggestions other than tossing your coffeemaker in the trash.

Don't speak for the group. Alan's advice is good. Mind you, some are
happy with percolated coffee (I have a couple of stovetops I actually
like) but generally, the advice about how bad a percolator is to your
coffee is sound, even if we are reminiscent of the good old days when
grandma always had a pot of coffee on the stove. It doesn't make
anyone in the group snobbish just because they've been enlightened
over the years, and we all started somewhere - me with a Krups steam
machine that I was happy with until I learnt better. I certainly
don't use the best of anything - my equipment is all 2nd hand and cost
nothing in the scheme of things.


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



   
Date: 10 Jan 2007 19:52:41
From: Tom
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
I wasn't speaking for the group........... I only made the very apparent
observation about the group that is glaringly obvious.... There is a lot to
learn on this site and information should be available for all levels of
users. I also started with a Krups steam bomb until I began traveling to
Europe and found out what good coffee tastes like. That pushed me to the
next level, which was the French Press and then to an automatic. The OP was
only looking for help with the first step, which I tried to give. Sorry if
I stepped on any toes. It doesn't appear that they were your toes, Danny,
so ????

Tom


"Danny" <danny@nospam.gaggia-espresso.com > wrote in message
news:50kafvF1g9306U1@mid.individual.net...
> Tom wrote:
>> As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on
>> anyone who uses less than the best of everything so don't look for too
>> many helpful suggestions other than tossing your coffeemaker in the
>> trash.
>
> Don't speak for the group. Alan's advice is good. Mind you, some are
> happy with percolated coffee (I have a couple of stovetops I actually
> like) but generally, the advice about how bad a percolator is to your
> coffee is sound, even if we are reminiscent of the good old days when
> grandma always had a pot of coffee on the stove. It doesn't make anyone
> in the group snobbish just because they've been enlightened over the
> years, and we all started somewhere - me with a Krups steam machine that I
> was happy with until I learnt better. I certainly don't use the best of
> anything - my equipment is all 2nd hand and cost nothing in the scheme of
> things.
>
>
> --
> Regards, Danny
>
> http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
> http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)
>




   
Date: 10 Jan 2007 07:44:06
From: GeeDubb
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?

"Danny" <danny@nospam.gaggia-espresso.com > wrote in message
news:50kafvF1g9306U1@mid.individual.net...
> Tom wrote:
>> As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on
>> anyone who uses less than the best of everything so don't look for too
>> many helpful suggestions other than tossing your coffeemaker in the
>> trash.
>
> Don't speak for the group. Alan's advice is good. Mind you, some are
> happy with percolated coffee (I have a couple of stovetops I actually
> like) but generally, the advice about how bad a percolator is to your
> coffee is sound, even if we are reminiscent of the good old days when
> grandma always had a pot of coffee on the stove. It doesn't make anyone
> in the group snobbish just because they've been enlightened over the
> years, and we all started somewhere - me with a Krups steam machine that I
> was happy with until I learnt better. I certainly don't use the best of
> anything - my equipment is all 2nd hand and cost nothing in the scheme of
> things.
>
>
> --
> Regards, Danny
>
> http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
> http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)

not to mention that wonderful aroma from a percolator that always lingered
around the house when I was small. Of course now that I've been enlightened
I only go back occasionally :-)

Gary (just for the smell of it) Williams



    
Date: 10 Jan 2007 14:25:33
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
If you want your house to smell good then buy a lb. of cheap coffee and let
it simmer on the stove. Just don't drink what's in the pan.

The wonderful smell is part of the problem in the perc - if the aromatics
are making your whole house smell good, they aren't in your cup anymore.

In some sense the fellow who likes Brown Gold in a perc has come to the
wrong place to ask advice. But whaddaya expect for free? The same would be
true in any other specialty group - if I ask some sterophile group how I can
make my Radio Shack speakers sound better when I play my 8-tracks, people
aren't going to give me a straight answer either.

"GeeDubb" <geedubb@qwest.net > wrote in message
news:45a4fbb1$0$10598$882e0bbb@news.ThunderNews.com...
>
> "Danny" <danny@nospam.gaggia-espresso.com> wrote in message
> news:50kafvF1g9306U1@mid.individual.net...
>> Tom wrote:
>>> As you guessed, this group is inundated with those who look down on
>>> anyone who uses less than the best of everything so don't look for too
>>> many helpful suggestions other than tossing your coffeemaker in the
>>> trash.
>>
>> Don't speak for the group. Alan's advice is good. Mind you, some are
>> happy with percolated coffee (I have a couple of stovetops I actually
>> like) but generally, the advice about how bad a percolator is to your
>> coffee is sound, even if we are reminiscent of the good old days when
>> grandma always had a pot of coffee on the stove. It doesn't make anyone
>> in the group snobbish just because they've been enlightened over the
>> years, and we all started somewhere - me with a Krups steam machine that
>> I was happy with until I learnt better. I certainly don't use the best
>> of anything - my equipment is all 2nd hand and cost nothing in the scheme
>> of things.
>>
>>
>> --
>> Regards, Danny
>>
>> http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
>> http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)
>
> not to mention that wonderful aroma from a percolator that always lingered
> around the house when I was small. Of course now that I've been
> enlightened I only go back occasionally :-)
>
> Gary (just for the smell of it) Williams




    
Date: 10 Jan 2007 16:16:48
From: Danny
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
GeeDubb wrote:

> not to mention that wonderful aroma from a percolator that always
> lingered around the house when I was small. Of course now that I've
> been enlightened I only go back occasionally :-)
>
> Gary (just for the smell of it) Williams

Best tip for selling your house (and having some bread in the oven)...


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



     
Date: 10 Jan 2007 09:40:55
From: GeeDubb
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?

"Danny" <danny@nospam.gaggia-espresso.com > wrote in message
news:50khpkF1gi11nU1@mid.individual.net...
> GeeDubb wrote:
>
>> not to mention that wonderful aroma from a percolator that always
>> lingered around the house when I was small. Of course now that I've been
>> enlightened I only go back occasionally :-)
>>
>> Gary (just for the smell of it) Williams
>
> Best tip for selling your house (and having some bread in the oven)...

or a turkey roasting

darn it Danny, now I'm hungry......

Gary



      
Date: 11 Jan 2007 09:18:21
From: Russell Patterson
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
On Wed, 10 Jan 2007 09:40:55 -0700, "GeeDubb" <geedubb@qwest.net >
wrote:

>
>"Danny" <danny@nospam.gaggia-espresso.com> wrote in message
>news:50khpkF1gi11nU1@mid.individual.net...
>> GeeDubb wrote:
>>
>>> not to mention that wonderful aroma from a percolator that always
>>> lingered around the house when I was small. Of course now that I've been
>>> enlightened I only go back occasionally :-)
>>>
>>> Gary (just for the smell of it) Williams
>>
>> Best tip for selling your house (and having some bread in the oven)...
>
>or a turkey roasting
>
>darn it Danny, now I'm hungry......
>
>Gary
Brownies!


 
Date: 10 Jan 2007 10:55:56
From: Coffee for Connoisseurs
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
"Then, of course, we have the good, old fashioned recirculating percolators,
which force boiling water up through a tube, over the coffee, which then
flows into the bottom of the pot to be recirculated again. My advice on
using these, manual or electric is:
1.. Grasp percolator firmly by the handle.
2.. Hurl forcefully into the nearest bin.
3.. Go and buy a plunger.
Coffee in a percolator is inevitably boiled several times over, leading to
significant overextraction and the tarry bitterness which boiling produces.
If you HAVE to use a percolator, choose a coffee which is low in acidity and
VERY smooth, and grind it even coarser than for plunger. Allow it to perk
for no more than 3 minutes. That said, you can get excellent coffee by
simply pouring "off the boil" water into a ceramic or metal pot which has
10g of coffee per 180ml of water in it, stirring for a couple of minutes and
allowing a couple more minutes for the grounds to settle. If you're really
fastidious, pour through a strainer when serving."

http://www.coffeeco.com.au/altcof/altcoffeepage7.html

What happened to USA superket coffees?

http://www.coffeereview.com/article.cfm?ID=128


--
Alan

alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au
www.coffeeco.com.au




  
Date: 11 Jan 2007 01:47:54
From:
Subject: Re: How to make the best perked coffee?
"Coffee for Connoisseurs" <alanfrew@coffeeco.com.au > wrote in
news:0D3ph.4329$A8.1265@news-server.bigpond.net.au:

> What happened to USA superket coffees?
>
> http://www.coffeereview.com/article.cfm?ID=128
>

He seems to like Brown Gold, but I'm surprised there's no mention of
tinson's which is almost as good.

Brown Gold continues to be the one superket coffee that's still sold
in a 1 lb can.




>From: "Tom" <tjwitman@bellsouth.net>


> Your blender as a grinder will yield the same problems as cheap blade
> grinders do, that is they 'burn' or overheat the beans as the madly
whirl
> away. Invest in a $40+ burr/stone grinder and you will be happy. So
for
> less than $100 you can upgrade your coffee experience to the next
level.
> Eventually you will see the incentive to take another step up closer to
the
> other people here.



Where do you guys get the time to do this in the morning? As a night
person, I'm lucky to get 3-4 hours sleep before work and can barely see
when I leave the house. I usually get out of bed with just enough time
to spare for a shower and shave.


>From: "Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net>


> If you want your house to smell good then buy a lb. of cheap coffee and
let
> it simmer on the stove. Just don't drink what's in the pan.
>
> The wonderful smell is part of the problem in the perc - if the
aromatics
> are making your whole house smell good, they aren't in your cup
anymore.


What curmudeons I'm dealing with! I can only imagine some of you in an
office around the Bunn-o-matic coffee maker, with four pots simmering,
arguing for two hours every day with the office manager that she/he
should invest in much fancier equipment and skip the house brand 1.5 oz
bags of coffee. LOL!!!!



>From: "Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net>

> So I would second Alan's advice to get rid of it.
> Besides the [IMO] terrible taste, there is the matter of the extra
caffein
> produced by this process. Your arteries will not appreciate it
[although my
> grandfather thrived on it to age 88].


Don't you think that the tubing of the drip coffeemakers, even after a
vinegar and water solution cleaning, looks like the arteries of a guy who
needs an angioplasty? I'm sure that most coffeemaker owners rarely clean
or delime their equipment, and if they do it's rare. The inside of the
unit accumulates all kinds of dust, grime and bacteria, not to mention
occasional insects which crawl into it in between uses. The only barrier
between that and one's digestive tract is the paper filter and the heat
of the water.