coffee-forum.net
Promoting coffee discussion.

Main
Date: 16 May 2007 08:35:11
From: Bill (Adopt)
Subject: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
..following a few bouts of home roasting, in which various
milk and frying pans have been ruined and during the course
of which the kitchen ceiling has occasionally disappeared,
I'm gradually garnering the confidence and cash to invest
in a small 'IRoast2'...

Not having a cooker hood or other kitchen exhaust, the
IRoast2's smoke exhaust apparently includes a standard
fitment collar for washer/drier type hot air exhaust
trunking. No problem sourcing the trunking, nor in
sourcing the aluminium heat resistant type, but...

The IRoast2 blurb seems to suggest that attaching this
trunking to exhaust the heated gasses will affect the
performance, or perhaps roast profiles, of the IRoast2.

Has anyone any experience of using such an exhaust with
the IRoast2 and of it's affect upon performance and/or
the IRoast2's programmeable profiles - particularly any
affect that might be terminally detrimental to a
'successful' roast..?

..and thanks for your help.. :))

Bill ZFC

--
Adoption InterLink UK with -=- http://www.billsimpson.com/
Domain Host Orpheus Internet -=- http://www.orpheusinternet.co.uk/




 
Date: 18 May 2007 19:19:19
From: theotherjo@gmail.com
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
On May 18, 3:09 pm, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On May 18, 9:23 pm, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On May 18, 8:26 pm, "theothe...@gmail.com" <theothe...@gmail.com>
> > wrote:
>
> > > On May 16, 2:42 am, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> > [snip]
> > > > I do recommend fitting your IRoast with a thermocouple so that you can
> > > > monitor the actual bean temperature. Otherwise, it's kind of hard to
> > > > tell what's really going on with the roast.
>
> > > > -Ped
>
> > > Ped,
> > > I'm setting up an I-roast 2 and don't understand how the thermocouple
> > > is adapted. Is is actually measuring bean enviorment temp? Is that the
> > > same as bean temp? Does anyone have a link to where I could find a
> > > thermocouple for sale and or any pics of one adapted to the i roast 2
> > > unit?
> > > TIA for any help.
> > > JoeR
>
> > I haven't seen the IRoast2, I have an IRoast. It gives what is
> > supposed to be the input air temperature on the display, but that is
> > definitely not the actual bean temperature. I figured you need a TC
> > actually touching the beans to get anything like the actual bean
> > temp. Of course, without drilling into a bean, it's hard to get a
> > true bean temp, but I'm willing to settle for "average bean surface"
> > temp.
>
> > I think modifying your roaster probably pretty much voids your
> > warranty and is always at your own risk. Also, you can easily mess up
> > your roaster. Keep that in mind. I looked at it and thought about it
> > for quite a while before I actually did anything.
>
> > I started out by snaking the TC wire down through the (slightly
> > modified) lid and down into the roasting chamber. That setup was a
> > pain in the butt.
>
> > I finally screwed up the courage to drill a small hole through the
> > plastic part of the roasting chamber, angled up from right below the
> > level where the top of the bottom (motor) section of the roaster comes
> > to on the roasting chamber when it's latched down. The placement and
> > angle of the hole are kind of tricky because it needs to be aligned
> > with one of the notches that holds the roasting chamber to the base,
> > but not interfere with latching.
>
> > >From there I guided the TC wire up into the roasting chamber between
>
> > the glass and the rubber seal around the bottom of the chamber. It is
> > then bent over and extends about a half-inch into the chamber, into
> > the beans, but not directly in the hot air flow.
>
> > I'll get some pics posted soon to illustrate what I've done. There
> > may be better ways to do it, but I guess I got lucky, it worked for
> > me. Others probably have other ways, you might want to search the ac
> > archives.
>
> > The TC gives you a better data point to follow than just input air
> > temp, but always for me the end of the roast is more likely to be
> > determined by sight, sound and smell as much as by a TC reading. One
> > data point that indicates to me how the roast is going overall is the
> > temp at which the input air temperature and bean temperature "cross".
>
> > Oh, I purchased my TC from Sweet Maria's (I hope that doesn't count as
> > advertising in a post!).
>
> > -Ped
>
> As promised, here's a link to photos:http://pedxing.googlepages.com/iroastthermocouple
>
> -Ped

Ped,
Thank you, Not a bad looking job. Your information here is a good
place to start. I think I will find another I roast unit to experiment
with. This unit I gave to my ( I can't say wife, we never sign any
papers) Domestic Partner for Mothers Day. Since she is also my
business partner I better look for a used unit for this mod. The pics
are worth at least a 100 cups of good coffee.
Cheers,
JoeR



 
Date: 18 May 2007 15:09:04
From: pedxing
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
On May 18, 9:23 pm, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On May 18, 8:26 pm, "theothe...@gmail.com" <theothe...@gmail.com>
> wrote:
>
>
>
> > On May 16, 2:42 am, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> [snip]
> > > I do recommend fitting your IRoast with a thermocouple so that you can
> > > monitor the actual bean temperature. Otherwise, it's kind of hard to
> > > tell what's really going on with the roast.
>
> > > -Ped
>
> > Ped,
> > I'm setting up an I-roast 2 and don't understand how the thermocouple
> > is adapted. Is is actually measuring bean enviorment temp? Is that the
> > same as bean temp? Does anyone have a link to where I could find a
> > thermocouple for sale and or any pics of one adapted to the i roast 2
> > unit?
> > TIA for any help.
> > JoeR
>
> I haven't seen the IRoast2, I have an IRoast. It gives what is
> supposed to be the input air temperature on the display, but that is
> definitely not the actual bean temperature. I figured you need a TC
> actually touching the beans to get anything like the actual bean
> temp. Of course, without drilling into a bean, it's hard to get a
> true bean temp, but I'm willing to settle for "average bean surface"
> temp.
>
> I think modifying your roaster probably pretty much voids your
> warranty and is always at your own risk. Also, you can easily mess up
> your roaster. Keep that in mind. I looked at it and thought about it
> for quite a while before I actually did anything.
>
> I started out by snaking the TC wire down through the (slightly
> modified) lid and down into the roasting chamber. That setup was a
> pain in the butt.
>
> I finally screwed up the courage to drill a small hole through the
> plastic part of the roasting chamber, angled up from right below the
> level where the top of the bottom (motor) section of the roaster comes
> to on the roasting chamber when it's latched down. The placement and
> angle of the hole are kind of tricky because it needs to be aligned
> with one of the notches that holds the roasting chamber to the base,
> but not interfere with latching.
>
> >From there I guided the TC wire up into the roasting chamber between
>
> the glass and the rubber seal around the bottom of the chamber. It is
> then bent over and extends about a half-inch into the chamber, into
> the beans, but not directly in the hot air flow.
>
> I'll get some pics posted soon to illustrate what I've done. There
> may be better ways to do it, but I guess I got lucky, it worked for
> me. Others probably have other ways, you might want to search the ac
> archives.
>
> The TC gives you a better data point to follow than just input air
> temp, but always for me the end of the roast is more likely to be
> determined by sight, sound and smell as much as by a TC reading. One
> data point that indicates to me how the roast is going overall is the
> temp at which the input air temperature and bean temperature "cross".
>
> Oh, I purchased my TC from Sweet Maria's (I hope that doesn't count as
> advertising in a post!).
>
> -Ped

As promised, here's a link to photos: http://pedxing.googlepages.com/iroastthermocouple

-Ped



 
Date: 18 May 2007 12:23:22
From: pedxing
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
On May 18, 8:26 pm, "theothe...@gmail.com" <theothe...@gmail.com >
wrote:
> On May 16, 2:42 am, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
[snip]
> > I do recommend fitting your IRoast with a thermocouple so that you can
> > monitor the actual bean temperature. Otherwise, it's kind of hard to
> > tell what's really going on with the roast.
>
> > -Ped
>
> Ped,
> I'm setting up an I-roast 2 and don't understand how the thermocouple
> is adapted. Is is actually measuring bean enviorment temp? Is that the
> same as bean temp? Does anyone have a link to where I could find a
> thermocouple for sale and or any pics of one adapted to the i roast 2
> unit?
> TIA for any help.
> JoeR

I haven't seen the IRoast2, I have an IRoast. It gives what is
supposed to be the input air temperature on the display, but that is
definitely not the actual bean temperature. I figured you need a TC
actually touching the beans to get anything like the actual bean
temp. Of course, without drilling into a bean, it's hard to get a
true bean temp, but I'm willing to settle for "average bean surface"
temp.

I think modifying your roaster probably pretty much voids your
warranty and is always at your own risk. Also, you can easily mess up
your roaster. Keep that in mind. I looked at it and thought about it
for quite a while before I actually did anything.

I started out by snaking the TC wire down through the (slightly
modified) lid and down into the roasting chamber. That setup was a
pain in the butt.

I finally screwed up the courage to drill a small hole through the
plastic part of the roasting chamber, angled up from right below the
level where the top of the bottom (motor) section of the roaster comes
to on the roasting chamber when it's latched down. The placement and
angle of the hole are kind of tricky because it needs to be aligned
with one of the notches that holds the roasting chamber to the base,
but not interfere with latching.

>From there I guided the TC wire up into the roasting chamber between
the glass and the rubber seal around the bottom of the chamber. It is
then bent over and extends about a half-inch into the chamber, into
the beans, but not directly in the hot air flow.

I'll get some pics posted soon to illustrate what I've done. There
may be better ways to do it, but I guess I got lucky, it worked for
me. Others probably have other ways, you might want to search the ac
archives.

The TC gives you a better data point to follow than just input air
temp, but always for me the end of the roast is more likely to be
determined by sight, sound and smell as much as by a TC reading. One
data point that indicates to me how the roast is going overall is the
temp at which the input air temperature and bean temperature "cross".

Oh, I purchased my TC from Sweet Maria's (I hope that doesn't count as
advertising in a post!).

-Ped



 
Date: 18 May 2007 11:26:36
From: theotherjo@gmail.com
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
On May 16, 2:42 am, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On May 16, 9:35 am, "Bill (Adopt)" <a...@billsimpson.com> wrote:
>
> > Not having a cooker hood or other kitchen exhaust, the
> > IRoast2's smoke exhaust apparently includes a standard
> > fitment collar for washer/drier type hot air exhaust
> > trunking. No problem sourcing the trunking, nor in
> > sourcing the aluminium heat resistant type, but...
>
> > The IRoast2 blurb seems to suggest that attaching this
> > trunking to exhaust the heated gasses will affect the
> > performance, or perhaps roast profiles, of the IRoast2.
>
> > Has anyone any experience of using such an exhaust with
> > the IRoast2 and of it's affect upon performance and/or
> > the IRoast2's programmeable profiles - particularly any
> > affect that might be terminally detrimental to a
> > 'successful' roast..?
>
> I don't have an IRoast2, but I have an IRoast, and use a dryer exhaust
> trunk (hung out the window) with it.
>
> The only time I have experienced significant shifts in the roast
> profile is when it's really cold (-20F) outside.
>
> I don't think it is the exhaust so much as the fact that I have a
> window open right next to the roaster, so it is sucking in really cold
> air. I can usually counteract this problem by stoking the wood stove
> before roasting so the kitchen where I roast is nice and warm.
>
> But under normal circumstances, it doesn't have much of an effect. I
> see a bigger effect caused by variations in the chaff production of
> different beans and how clean I keep the top screen.
>
> I do recommend fitting your IRoast with a thermocouple so that you can
> monitor the actual bean temperature. Otherwise, it's kind of hard to
> tell what's really going on with the roast.
>
> -Ped

Ped,
I'm setting up an I-roast 2 and don't understand how the thermocouple
is adapted. Is is actually measuring bean enviorment temp? Is that the
same as bean temp? Does anyone have a link to where I could find a
thermocouple for sale and or any pics of one adapted to the i roast 2
unit?
TIA for any help.
JoeR



 
Date: 16 May 2007 07:43:50
From: AlanM
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
I was using my iRoast in Pittsburgh for several years. I set up the
exhaust system from the collar through a 'closed' window. My roast
profiles did not vary from summer through winter.

I suggest that merely pushing the drier exhaust hose out of a window
permits too many fumes and smoke to circulate back into the house.

For very little money I purchased an expandable and portable window vent
/screen from Home Depot, attached a dryer flange to the screen (which I
covered with metallic duct tape, and placed that into the window. It
worked like a charm, very few gases returned to the room, the roaster
functioned as usual, and profiles remain constant throughout the
different seasons.

Sorry, no pictures available, I now place the iRoast on the outside
balcony of my condo in southern Florida

Michael

Bill (Adopt) wrote:
> ..following a few bouts of home roasting, in which various
> milk and frying pans have been ruined and during the course
> of which the kitchen ceiling has occasionally disappeared,
> I'm gradually garnering the confidence and cash to invest
> in a small 'IRoast2'...

> ..and thanks for your help.. :))
>
> Bill ZFC
>


  
Date: 16 May 2007 09:26:53
From: Tony Verhulst
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
AlanM wrote:
> I was using my iRoast in Pittsburgh for several years. I set up the
> exhaust system from the collar through a 'closed' window. My roast
> profiles did not vary from summer through winter.
>
> I suggest that merely pushing the drier exhaust hose out of a window
> permits too many fumes and smoke to circulate back into the house.

Here's my (previously posted) solution.

http://home.comcast.net/~tony.verhulst/PICS/Misc/vent_window.JPG
http://home.comcast.net/~tony.verhulst/PICS/Misc/vent_fan.JPG
http://home.comcast.net/~tony.verhulst/PICS/Misc/vent_side.JPG

The long hose allows the exhaust to cool sufficiently so that by the
time it gets to the fan, you can comfortably put your hand on the
exhaust hose - thereby avoiding heat damaging the fan.

Tony V


   
Date: 17 May 2007 08:44:07
From: Bill (Adopt)
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
In article <S7ydnXBOBeJdm9bbnZ2dnUVZ_jWdnZ2d@comcast.com >,
Tony Verhulst <no@thankyou.com > wrote:
> AlanM wrote:
> > I was using my iRoast in Pittsburgh for several years. I set up the
> > exhaust system from the collar through a 'closed' window. My roast
> > profiles did not vary from summer through winter.
> >
> > I suggest that merely pushing the drier exhaust hose out of a window
> > permits too many fumes and smoke to circulate back into the house.

> Here's my (previously posted) solution.

> http://home.comcast.net/~tony.verhulst/PICS/Misc/vent_window.JPG
> http://home.comcast.net/~tony.verhulst/PICS/Misc/vent_fan.JPG
> http://home.comcast.net/~tony.verhulst/PICS/Misc/vent_side.JPG

> The long hose allows the exhaust to cool sufficiently so that by the
> time it gets to the fan, you can comfortably put your hand on the
> exhaust hose - thereby avoiding heat damaging the fan.

Sorry to split this reply with Ped's helpful comment
above, but thanks Alan and Tony for your immediate
comments as well..

It seems that your experiences, as Ped, suggest that
an extension to the exhaust doesn't noticeably affect
a roast, unless the ambient temperature is at at the
very cool end of the scale.

This (non-affect) gives me the confidence to go ahead
with an IRoast2 which, with a normal pre-roast 150gm
load, should give about as much fresh roast - 110gm to
120gm roasted - as I can handle in seven to ten days.

I'm guessing, from what I read in and around ac, that
with the more upscale and larger roasters I will need
to add a larger mass of beans to get a sensible roast
profile - ie that none of them, IRoast included, take
too happily to roasting in undersize amounts.

So although a larger roaster might be slightly better,
if I can taste a difference, it will also lead inevitably
to significant waste. (I'm limited ..under Doc's orders
not to try much more than 15gm/18gm or so of roast daily.
Much more and it can apparently interfere with the way
in which heart and other meds interact - and it's got
nothing to with excess caffeine, either)!

Thank you all for your helpful and thought-provoking
comments.... :))

Bill ZFC

--
Adoption InterLink UK with -=- http://www.billsimpson.com/
Domain Host Orpheus Internet -=- http://www.orpheusinternet.co.uk/


 
Date: 16 May 2007 02:45:10
From: pedxing
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
On May 16, 11:42 am, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com > wrote:
>
> The only time I have experienced significant shifts in the roast
> profile is when it's really cold (-20F) outside.
>

Whoops, I mean +20F (or lower)...

-Ped



  
Date: 17 May 2007 07:54:48
From: Bill (Adopt)
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
In article <1179308710.647180.149040@p77g2000hsh.googlegroups.com >,
pedxing <pedxing@gmail.com > wrote:
> On May 16, 11:42 am, pedxing <pedx...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> > The only time I have experienced significant shifts in the roast
> > profile is when it's really cold (-20F) outside.
> >

> Whoops, I mean +20F (or lower)...

:)) Yes! I'd guessed, although for decades I've
been using Celsius.. ..even when visiting Canada
at even lower temperatures..!

.but I did get that you mean pretty cold.. ;))

..and thank you for your very prompt reply, Ped.
Your positive comments are very helpful...

:))

Bill ZFC

--
Adoption InterLink UK with -=- http://www.billsimpson.com/
Domain Host Orpheus Internet -=- http://www.orpheusinternet.co.uk/


 
Date: 16 May 2007 02:42:00
From: pedxing
Subject: Re: IRoast2 - exhaust trunking and profiles...
On May 16, 9:35 am, "Bill (Adopt)" <a...@billsimpson.com > wrote:
> Not having a cooker hood or other kitchen exhaust, the
> IRoast2's smoke exhaust apparently includes a standard
> fitment collar for washer/drier type hot air exhaust
> trunking. No problem sourcing the trunking, nor in
> sourcing the aluminium heat resistant type, but...
>
> The IRoast2 blurb seems to suggest that attaching this
> trunking to exhaust the heated gasses will affect the
> performance, or perhaps roast profiles, of the IRoast2.
>
> Has anyone any experience of using such an exhaust with
> the IRoast2 and of it's affect upon performance and/or
> the IRoast2's programmeable profiles - particularly any
> affect that might be terminally detrimental to a
> 'successful' roast..?

I don't have an IRoast2, but I have an IRoast, and use a dryer exhaust
trunk (hung out the window) with it.

The only time I have experienced significant shifts in the roast
profile is when it's really cold (-20F) outside.

I don't think it is the exhaust so much as the fact that I have a
window open right next to the roaster, so it is sucking in really cold
air. I can usually counteract this problem by stoking the wood stove
before roasting so the kitchen where I roast is nice and warm.

But under normal circumstances, it doesn't have much of an effect. I
see a bigger effect caused by variations in the chaff production of
different beans and how clean I keep the top screen.

I do recommend fitting your IRoast with a thermocouple so that you can
monitor the actual bean temperature. Otherwise, it's kind of hard to
tell what's really going on with the roast.

-Ped