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Date: 11 Jun 2007 14:31:55
From: shane
Subject: Kona Harvesting?
I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?

Shane





 
Date: 13 Jun 2007 14:33:08
From:
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 11, 5:31 pm, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com > wrote:
> I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
> labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
> Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
> Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>
> Shane

Labor intensive being that it takes about 1 minute to pick each bean.
Well, because the average worker is so totally stoned on Maui Wowie,
of course. Pick each nice ripe red cherrie and its like wow, man ....

Len

=============
http://www.CoffeeRoastersClub.com



 
Date: 13 Jun 2007 08:33:56
From: shane
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 13, 9:34 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net > wrote:
> I'd say that it's roughly the same. Local conditions (steepness of slope)
> and the customary planting and pruing methods may differ somewhat but in the
> end it's still picking cherries off of trees one by one. It's just that Kona
> workers are getting paid US wages to do this and people in 3rd world
> countries (and most coffee is grown in 3rd world-ish places) are getting
> paid 3rd world wages. If anything, some 3rd world coffees get more manual
> labor input during post pick processing due to the lack of motorized
> transport and processing equipment in some places. Kona is only labor
> intensive in comparison to other (mechanically harvested) Hawaiian coffees,
> not to PNG, Kenya, CR, etc.
>
> "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1181740922.169363.54830@x35g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
>
>
>
>
>
> > Thanks, Cea,
> > I think that your explaination makes the ad copy make more sense.
> > Kona harvesting is more labor intenstive than other Hawaiian coffees.
> > I am still curious as to if Kona is more difficult to harvest than
> > coffee grown in other parts of the world? Does all hand-picked coffee
> > require the same amount of labor?
>
> > Shane- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

It all makes sense now. The ad copy was refering to Kona being the
"most labor intesive coffee to harvest". This is true of Hawaiian
coffee, Kona is the most difficult Hawaiian coffee, but not coffee in
general.



 
Date: 13 Jun 2007 06:22:02
From: shane
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 12, 6:55 pm, b...@smithfarms.com wrote:
> On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 14:04:29 -0400, "Jack Denver"
>
>
>
>
>
> <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
> >Basically the trees are planted in rows on level or low sloping ground and
> >pruned in a special uniform way. A row harvester then goes down the row
> >when the beans are approximately ripe and shakes the trees so the beans fall
> >off into catcher that is under the machine. A lot of unripe cherries are
> >left on the trees and also fall off and have to be discarded in sorting but
> >the lost of quantity and quality (and thus price) is made up thru labor
> >savings and the planting of large acreages. There are coffee farms like
> >this in Brasil where one farm is bigger than the entire acreage of Kona.
>
> >"shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
> >news:1181665825.072604.78190@j4g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> >> On Jun 12, 9:44 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
> >>> "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
>
> >>>news:1181654201.101981.275060@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>
> >>> > On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>> >> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>
> >>> >> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
> >>> >> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
> >>> >> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
> >>> >> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>
> >>> >> > Shane
>
> >>> >> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
> >>> >> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
> >>> >> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
> >>> >> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
> >>> >> day.
>
> >>> > Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
> >>> > mountainous regions?
> >>> > I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
> >>> > My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
> >>> > coffees?
>
> >>> > Shane- Hide quoted text -
>
> >>> - Show quoted text -
>
> >> How does the mechanized harvesting work?
> >> I had been under the impression that coffee had to be hand picked, as
> >> the cherries ripen at different times.
>
> >> Shane
>
> When you count the acreage of "Hawaiian" coffee, the vast majority is
> Kauai coffee- something like 4000 acres. As I posted last week, Kauai
> coffee which is the preponderance of "Hawaiian" coffee is totally
> mechanized. It is not even the same variety as Kona- it is caturra
> and catuai etc. which were chosen because they are sturdier varieties
> and can with stand mechanical pruning, and mechanical harvesting (and
> forced air drying).
>
> So when Shane cited the original question, Kona is the most "labor
> intensive?"; he was correct, because it is indeed hand picked, hand
> pruned etc .Kona is much more labor intensive, much more care to
> detail, much smaller batches processed and just totally a different
> "animal".There is a vast difference in taste etc. between the 2 "K"
> coffees as a result.
>
> aloha,
> Cea
>
> roast beans to kona to email
> farmers of Pure Kona- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

Thanks, Cea,
I think that your explaination makes the ad copy make more sense.
Kona harvesting is more labor intenstive than other Hawaiian coffees.
I am still curious as to if Kona is more difficult to harvest than
coffee grown in other parts of the world? Does all hand-picked coffee
require the same amount of labor?

Shane



  
Date: 13 Jun 2007 10:34:27
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
I'd say that it's roughly the same. Local conditions (steepness of slope)
and the customary planting and pruing methods may differ somewhat but in the
end it's still picking cherries off of trees one by one. It's just that Kona
workers are getting paid US wages to do this and people in 3rd world
countries (and most coffee is grown in 3rd world-ish places) are getting
paid 3rd world wages. If anything, some 3rd world coffees get more manual
labor input during post pick processing due to the lack of motorized
transport and processing equipment in some places. Kona is only labor
intensive in comparison to other (mechanically harvested) Hawaiian coffees,
not to PNG, Kenya, CR, etc.

"shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote in message
news:1181740922.169363.54830@x35g2000prf.googlegroups.com...

>
> Thanks, Cea,
> I think that your explaination makes the ad copy make more sense.
> Kona harvesting is more labor intenstive than other Hawaiian coffees.
> I am still curious as to if Kona is more difficult to harvest than
> coffee grown in other parts of the world? Does all hand-picked coffee
> require the same amount of labor?
>
> Shane
>




 
Date: 12 Jun 2007 18:00:02
From: konapage
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 12, 6:30 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com > wrote:
> On Jun 12, 9:44 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
>
>
>
> > I think they were comparing it to the mechanized harvest coffee grown
> > elsewhere in Hawaii. The actual labor involved in Kona is no different than
> > any other montain grown coffee but the employers have to pay US wage rates.
>
> > "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
>
> >news:1181654201.101981.275060@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>
> > > On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com> wrote:
> > >> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>
> > >> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
> > >> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
> > >> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
> > >> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>
> > >> > Shane
>
> > >> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
> > >> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
> > >> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
> > >> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
> > >> day.
>
> > > Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
> > > mountainous regions?
> > > I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
> > > My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
> > > coffees?
>
> > > Shane- Hide quoted text -
>
> > - Show quoted text -
>
> How does the mechanized harvesting work?
> I had been under the impression that coffee had to be hand picked, as
> the cherries ripen at different times.
>
> Shane

Mechanized harvesting basically shakes the entire tree in order to
cause the coffee cherry to fall. So in the coffee beans you get the
ripe, over ripe, green cherry and spoiled.



 
Date: 12 Jun 2007 09:30:25
From: shane
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 12, 9:44 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net > wrote:
> I think they were comparing it to the mechanized harvest coffee grown
> elsewhere in Hawaii. The actual labor involved in Kona is no different than
> any other montain grown coffee but the employers have to pay US wage rates.
>
> "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
>
> news:1181654201.101981.275060@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>
>
>
> > On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com> wrote:
> >> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>
> >> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
> >> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
> >> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
> >> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>
> >> > Shane
>
> >> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
> >> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
> >> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
> >> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
> >> day.
>
> > Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
> > mountainous regions?
> > I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
> > My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
> > coffees?
>
> > Shane- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -

How does the mechanized harvesting work?
I had been under the impression that coffee had to be hand picked, as
the cherries ripen at different times.

Shane



  
Date: 12 Jun 2007 14:04:29
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
Basically the trees are planted in rows on level or low sloping ground and
pruned in a special uniform way. A row harvester then goes down the row
when the beans are approximately ripe and shakes the trees so the beans fall
off into catcher that is under the machine. A lot of unripe cherries are
left on the trees and also fall off and have to be discarded in sorting but
the lost of quantity and quality (and thus price) is made up thru labor
savings and the planting of large acreages. There are coffee farms like
this in Brasil where one farm is bigger than the entire acreage of Kona.


"shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote in message
news:1181665825.072604.78190@j4g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
> On Jun 12, 9:44 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
>> I think they were comparing it to the mechanized harvest coffee grown
>> elsewhere in Hawaii. The actual labor involved in Kona is no different
>> than
>> any other montain grown coffee but the employers have to pay US wage
>> rates.
>>
>> "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
>>
>> news:1181654201.101981.275060@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>
>>
>> > On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>>
>> >> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
>> >> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
>> >> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
>> >> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>>
>> >> > Shane
>>
>> >> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
>> >> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
>> >> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
>> >> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
>> >> day.
>>
>> > Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
>> > mountainous regions?
>> > I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
>> > My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
>> > coffees?
>>
>> > Shane- Hide quoted text -
>>
>> - Show quoted text -
>
> How does the mechanized harvesting work?
> I had been under the impression that coffee had to be hand picked, as
> the cherries ripen at different times.
>
> Shane
>




   
Date: 12 Jun 2007 13:55:21
From:
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Tue, 12 Jun 2007 14:04:29 -0400, "Jack Denver"
<nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote:

>Basically the trees are planted in rows on level or low sloping ground and
>pruned in a special uniform way. A row harvester then goes down the row
>when the beans are approximately ripe and shakes the trees so the beans fall
>off into catcher that is under the machine. A lot of unripe cherries are
>left on the trees and also fall off and have to be discarded in sorting but
>the lost of quantity and quality (and thus price) is made up thru labor
>savings and the planting of large acreages. There are coffee farms like
>this in Brasil where one farm is bigger than the entire acreage of Kona.
>
>
>"shane" <shane.olson@juno.com> wrote in message
>news:1181665825.072604.78190@j4g2000prf.googlegroups.com...
>> On Jun 12, 9:44 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote:
>>> "shane" <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote in message
>>>
>>> news:1181654201.101981.275060@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> > On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> >> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>>>
>>> >> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
>>> >> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
>>> >> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
>>> >> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>>>
>>> >> > Shane
>>>
>>> >> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
>>> >> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
>>> >> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
>>> >> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
>>> >> day.
>>>
>>> > Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
>>> > mountainous regions?
>>> > I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
>>> > My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
>>> > coffees?
>>>
>>> > Shane- Hide quoted text -
>>>
>>> - Show quoted text -
>>
>> How does the mechanized harvesting work?
>> I had been under the impression that coffee had to be hand picked, as
>> the cherries ripen at different times.
>>
>> Shane
>>
>

When you count the acreage of "Hawaiian" coffee, the vast majority is
Kauai coffee- something like 4000 acres. As I posted last week, Kauai
coffee which is the preponderance of "Hawaiian" coffee is totally
mechanized. It is not even the same variety as Kona- it is caturra
and catuai etc. which were chosen because they are sturdier varieties
and can with stand mechanical pruning, and mechanical harvesting (and
forced air drying).

So when Shane cited the original question, Kona is the most "labor
intensive?"; he was correct, because it is indeed hand picked, hand
pruned etc .Kona is much more labor intensive, much more care to
detail, much smaller batches processed and just totally a different
"animal".There is a vast difference in taste etc. between the 2 "K"
coffees as a result.

aloha,
Cea

roast beans to kona to email
farmers of Pure Kona


 
Date: 12 Jun 2007 06:16:41
From: shane
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com > wrote:
> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>
> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>
> > Shane
>
> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
> day.

Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
mountainous regions?
I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
coffees?

Shane



  
Date: 12 Jun 2007 10:44:45
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
I think they were comparing it to the mechanized harvest coffee grown
elsewhere in Hawaii. The actual labor involved in Kona is no different than
any other montain grown coffee but the employers have to pay US wage rates.

"shane" <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote in message
news:1181654201.101981.275060@z28g2000prd.googlegroups.com...
> On Jun 12, 2:11 am, konapage <ptrygs...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com> wrote:
>>
>> > I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
>> > labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
>> > Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
>> > Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>>
>> > Shane
>>
>> The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
>> picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
>> pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
>> pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
>> day.
>
> Isn't a lot/most of coffee around the world grown on mountains or in
> mountainous regions?
> I know the Kona workers are paid better, that was not my question.
> My question is: Is Kona really harder to pick than other regional
> coffees?
>
> Shane
>




 
Date: 12 Jun 2007 07:11:04
From: konapage
Subject: Re: Kona Harvesting?
On Jun 11, 11:31 am, shane <shane.ol...@juno.com > wrote:
> I was ran across an add on a website touting Kona as "It is more
> labor intensive to harvest these special beans."
> Having never actually seen a coffee tree myself, is this true? Is
> Kona more difficult to harvest that other regional coffees?
>
> Shane

The Kona growing district is mountainous and all coffee is hand
picked. The workers make a great wage depending upon how much they
pick. Not like other areas where the pickers make pennies a day. The
pickers are paid by the pound and can make a couple hundred dollars a
day.