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Date: 16 Jan 2007 04:35:45
From:
Subject: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind)
I'm having trouble getting my grinder to grind fine enough. The
grounds seem to be closer to drip than espresso. I can not pack the
coffee like I use to with having someone grind it for me. The water
seems to just run through it and I loose pressure so fast I can not
steam my milk enough either. Anyone know of what I may be doing wrong?


I have pulled the blades and put them back in several times.. but no
avail.





 
Date: 18 Jan 2007 17:21:49
From:
Subject: Re: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind) -- not OK for espresso.

Thanks to everyone for the help... I do have a cheap Krups II Caffe
Duomo. I make mostly Latte's and it works pretty well for that. I
would like to make good espresso and it is definately lacking there.

The grinder was a christmas gift from the wife. I'll just have to step
up to some better models on both ends it sounds. I have had this Krups
machine for a over two years and made lots of lattes with it so it has
more than paid for itself.

Thanks again.. I'll keep reading and find a good model to buy.



 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 11:49:28
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind) -- not OK for espresso.
espresso rig --

get a gaggia MDF -- $200 or less.

machine? gaggia espresso $200 or less

all new stuff.

dave



  
Date: 16 Jan 2007 14:23:08
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind) -- not OK for espresso.
In article <1168976968.330899.103570@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com >,
"daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com > wrote:

> espresso rig --
>
> get a gaggia MDF -- $200 or less.
>
> machine? gaggia espresso $200 or less
>
> all new stuff.
>
> dave

I had an MDF and while it worked OK, the lack of fine tuning made
espresso a bit hit or miss.

I think I would recommend a Cunill Tranquillo instead at about the same
price.

I would also recommend an Ascaso I2 at $215 or so. I have this one and
am very impressed with the grind quality for espresso.


   
Date: 16 Jan 2007 15:07:36
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Re: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind) -- not OK for espresso.
I have had no problems with my Gaggia MDF [$150 on sale several years ago].
I, too, started with a Krups steam brewer. It just wouldn't make espresso.
It would make strong coffee, which could be drinkable if I used it to flavor
milk. Since I don't care for the milk drinks, I bought a Gaggia Coffee
reconditioned for $200. Beware, though, because once addicted, you may
continually want something better in your quest for perfect espresso. I
recently sold my Gaggia and bought myself a Silvia for an early Christmas
present.

"Lloyd Parsons" <lloydparsons@mac.com > wrote in message
news:lloydparsons-D7D727.14230816012007@individual.net...
> In article <1168976968.330899.103570@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com>,
> "daveb" <davebobblane@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> espresso rig --
>>
>> get a gaggia MDF -- $200 or less.
>>
>> machine? gaggia espresso $200 or less
>>
>> all new stuff.
>>
>> dave
>
> I had an MDF and while it worked OK, the lack of fine tuning made
> espresso a bit hit or miss.
>
> I think I would recommend a Cunill Tranquillo instead at about the same
> price.
>
> I would also recommend an Ascaso I2 at $215 or so. I have this one and
> am very impressed with the grind quality for espresso.




 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 12:20:57
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind)
The only thing you did wrong was buy this grinder. (Actually your reference
to losing pressure to steam milk implies that you have a steam pressure
"espresso" machine which is another mistake.)

Unfortunately the manufacturers lied to you - it's not entirely their fault.
There is a consumer demand for under $100 grinders and espresso machines,
but you can't make either a quality grinder or a true (pump) espresso
machine that can sell at that price point, so instead they sell you
inadequate equipment that is basically a complete waste of money - "toy"
versions of the real thing.

Read up on this group and on coffeegeek and start saving your pennies for a
new rig that will actually be able to make espresso. You don't have to spend
thousands the way some people do, but you do have to spend several hundred.


<casper@naegle.com > wrote in message
news:1168950945.370364.216670@l53g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> I'm having trouble getting my grinder to grind fine enough. The
> grounds seem to be closer to drip than espresso. I can not pack the
> coffee like I use to with having someone grind it for me. The water
> seems to just run through it and I loose pressure so fast I can not
> steam my milk enough either. Anyone know of what I may be doing wrong?
>
>
> I have pulled the blades and put them back in several times.. but no
> avail.
>




 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 12:10:48
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: German home roaster
Good analysis - I can't imagine being tied to one source of pre-polished
beans - this defeats most of the purpose of roasting your own.

This thing has actually been around for a while. As others have pointed
out, it's basically a heat gun pointed at a rotating mesh drum. Aside from
the profiling, you could rig something up at home that does the same thing
for a small fraction of the price.


<mandtprice@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1168963000.788524.164880@38g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...

René van Sint Annaland wrote:
> I'd guess that it could be used with normal green beans, but it will be
> somewhat messy with all the chaff flying around, definitely an outdoors
> roaster....
>
> Any experiences with this unit, anyone? Comments?

Something like this comes around at least once a year. The thinking
always goes like this: "WOW, coffee roasting would be so much nicer if
it weren't for all that smoke and chaff!" This style of roaster
depends on being fed polished beans - i.e. ones that have had the chaff
removed mechanically. My reaction to that is like buying a car that
can only be driven on perfectly smooth roads because a suspension would
be so much effort and complexity. To buy one of these is to lock
oneself into only buying greens from the same company because none of
the 'real' green suppliers sells these polished greens.

Chaff and smoke are a part of the roast. Any roaster that can't
survive both is broken as designed. Most of the home roasters just let
the smoke blow away, but some do try to wash it through a catalytic
converter first. I can't think of any purpose commercial roaster,
either home or pro, that doesn't have a chaff collector. Most of the
home-built machines just let it blow away/around.

Because chaff will follow the air stream inside this roaster, chaff
will collect in the exhaust and overheat the machine. This will, from
least worrisome to most, defeat the machines ability to control the
roast, overheat the machine, destroy the machine or catch fire.

Bottom line: get a different roaster by buying something else or
building your own.

Matthew




 
Date: 16 Jan 2007 08:49:59
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Krups GVX1 (espresso grind)
casper@naegle.com wrote:

>I'm having trouble getting my grinder to grind fine enough. The
>grounds seem to be closer to drip than espresso. I can not pack the
>coffee like I use to with having someone grind it for me. The water
>seems to just run through it and I loose pressure so fast I can not
>steam my milk enough either. Anyone know of what I may be doing wrong?
>
>I have pulled the blades and put them back in several times.. but no
>avail.

Although I have not used this grinder, the odds of a $40-50USD grinder
working for espresso (at least with a pump-driven machine without a
crema-enhancing portafilter) is slim to none. Replacement burrs for
Most decent grinders cost about the same or more than this entire
grinder. It may be possible to get it to approximate an espresso grind
by readjusting the grind range somehow, but if the burrs get to close
they will probably be damaged.

Some of the ad copy for it is interesting and entertaining though:

"Advanced commercial style grinding burrs" - when you consider that a
set of burrs for semi-commercial grinders sell for about the same as
what this grinder costs, that is laughable. I could just as easily
say, "I run in an Olympic-quality style."

"Airtight bean hopper holds ˝ pound of beans" - If it is truly
air-tight, how do the beans get into the grinding mechanism?

"Burrs produce less heat than blades – preserves more coffee aroma and
flavor" I would have guessed that any grinding mechanism is going to
produce more heat than a blade as is used in a whirly grinder (which
doesn't grind at all).

I have a chapter on "Grinder Frugality." Check it out on my website.
there are pictures showing the burrs of 'economy' grinders.


Randy "cheap grinders = cheap espresso" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com