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Date: 18 Aug 2007 10:57:56
From: Randall Nortman
Subject: Lab filter paper for coffee?
Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?

TIA,

--
Randall




 
Date: 18 Aug 2007 08:15:43
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Lab filter paper for coffee?
Randall Nortman wrote:
> Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
> the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
> do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?
>
> TIA,
>

Is there much concern in the scientific community that the bleach will
affect their experiments?

R "press pot all the way" TF


  
Date: 18 Aug 2007 13:52:40
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: Lab filter paper for coffee?
Food grade filter paper hasn't been bleached with 'bleach' for years. It's
an oxygen process. No bleach residue or dioxin worries. Now the brown
paper...that's just nasty.
--
*********************
Ed Needham
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
*********************

"Moka Java" <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com > wrote in message
news:5io68aF3q6dvqU1@mid.individual.net...
> Randall Nortman wrote:
>> Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
>> the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
>> do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?
>>
>> TIA,
>>
>
> Is there much concern in the scientific community that the bleach will
> affect their experiments?
>
> R "press pot all the way" TF




  
Date: 18 Aug 2007 12:58:19
From: Randall Nortman
Subject: Re: Lab filter paper for coffee?
On 2007-08-18, Moka Java <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com > wrote:
> Randall Nortman wrote:
>> Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
>> the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
>> do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?
>
> Is there much concern in the scientific community that the bleach will
> affect their experiments?

I am not saying that it's a problem one way or another, which is why I
asked, but your argument is not particularly compelling. There are
many types of filters available to laboratory scientists -- glass
fiber, ceramic, porous PTFE, and the list goes on. Paper is the
cheapest and often easiest to use, and whatever contaminants might be
in it are not reactive enough or present in large enough amounts to
affect the vast majority of experiments, and so paper is very
frequently used. But those other filter types do exist, and one
reason they exist (among others) is that you might be filtering
something that would react with the paper or pick up undesirable
contaminants from it. It all depends on what you're doing.

So -- if what you're doing is filtering coffee for human consumption,
is there any risk? All decent coffee filters these days are bleached
in such a way as to prevent formation of dioxins or else remove almost
all of them from the paper. I assume that lab filters would be
produced to the same or higher standards of purity, but you never
know, right? At least I don't know -- do you?

--
Randall


   
Date: 18 Aug 2007 21:47:46
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Lab filter paper for coffee?
Randall Nortman wrote:
> On 2007-08-18, Moka Java <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com> wrote:
>> Randall Nortman wrote:
>>> Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
>>> the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
>>> do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?
>> Is there much concern in the scientific community that the bleach will
>> affect their experiments?
>
> I am not saying that it's a problem one way or another, which is why I
> asked, but your argument is not particularly compelling. There are
> many types of filters available to laboratory scientists -- glass
> fiber, ceramic, porous PTFE, and the list goes on. Paper is the
> cheapest and often easiest to use, and whatever contaminants might be
> in it are not reactive enough or present in large enough amounts to
> affect the vast majority of experiments, and so paper is very
> frequently used. But those other filter types do exist, and one
> reason they exist (among others) is that you might be filtering
> something that would react with the paper or pick up undesirable
> contaminants from it. It all depends on what you're doing.
>
> So -- if what you're doing is filtering coffee for human consumption,
> is there any risk? All decent coffee filters these days are bleached
> in such a way as to prevent formation of dioxins or else remove almost
> all of them from the paper. I assume that lab filters would be
> produced to the same or higher standards of purity, but you never
> know, right? At least I don't know -- do you?
>

You obviously know more about filters than I do. Perhaps you cold send
an email off to the filter paper maker and ask if they're food safe.
There's probably a MSDS online, no? http://www.ilpi.com/msds/

R "I still don't like filtered coffee" TF


 
Date: 18 Aug 2007 04:56:39
From:
Subject: Re: Lab filter paper for coffee?
On Aug 18, 3:57 am, Randall Nortman <usenet8...@wonderclown.com >
wrote:
> Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
> the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
> do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?
>
Yes and no, respectively. I've used qualitative filter paper in a
Chemex with fine results. Of course if you try it and die, don't sue
me.

Best,
David



  
Date: 18 Aug 2007 19:48:05
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: Lab filter paper for coffee?

<David.Lewis@pobox.com > wrote in message
news:1187438199.856809.300610@r29g2000hsg.googlegroups.com...
> On Aug 18, 3:57 am, Randall Nortman <usenet8...@wonderclown.com>
> wrote:
>> Anybody filtered coffee through laboratory filter paper before? Are
>> the normal general purpose filters good enough to catch the fines, and
>> do I need to be worried about dioxin from the bleached paper?
>>
> Yes and no, respectively. I've used qualitative filter paper in a
> Chemex with fine results. Of course if you try it and die, don't sue
> me.
>
> Best,
> David
>

He couldn't very well sue you if he was dead could he? {;-)
Craig.