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Date: 17 May 2007 08:39:33
From:
Subject: Latte Art
Hi! Anyone into latte art? Any tips on making them? Why can't I find
cafes in the UK that can make latte art?
Stevo





 
Date: 23 May 2007 00:57:53
From: Simon Wilson
Subject: Re: Latte Art

<stephen.yeung@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1179416373.311137.247070@q75g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
> Hi! Anyone into latte art? Any tips on making them? Why can't I find
> cafes in the UK that can make latte art?
> Stevo
>

Stevo

Try Flat Whites in Berwick St London - they get the beans from Monmouth
Coffee & pour Rosetta Latte/Cappas (I understand they are called Flat Whites
in Aus/NZ - assume its cos the milk is flat, ie textured wet & not that dry
sea-foam every other place serves *$ etc...)

In response to other posts here trying to emulate the basic latte art
pouring technique you will need:

1) an espresso machine or steam boiler - Its alot easier on a proper
commercial machine (cos of the volume of steam)

2) About 4-6 Hours spare!!!

3) About 4 x 4/6 pints of milk to practice on

4) A decent drain! :)

5) ohh and a decent S/S pitcher with a spout

I found the best tip is to stretch the milk until you feel the pitcher
change from COLD to slightly warm (On a Commercial machine with about 7oz
milk in a 1/2 litre pitcher this takes about 4 secs - its real fast) - Go
for a subtle hissing sound when stretching, you get this by moving the
pitcher to the side of the wand and gently allowing in air with the wand
high on surface of milk.

Then roll the milk ( drop the wand further into the milk) until you can't
hold the bottom of the pitcher or just before! - If you leave the steam in
any longer the milk will froth too dry.

Set the pitcher to one side - I clean my portafilter and flush the group.

Now gently rock the pitcher and you will find the milk will shine like
chrome (aka David Schomer).

Now pour gently into the centre of the creama in your cup or mug. Let the
milk flow steadily faster and start to shake the pitcher a little to
encourage the thicker foam out as well. (sorry if this causes offense - but
you look like you have Parkinsons when doing this)

Just as you reach the top of the cup smartly run the pitcher forward over
the edge of the cup to make a straight line in the creama

First few times you will only get a heart shape - but thats the start -
you'll soon get the hang of it.

Keys are: - Not TOO hot milk - Not TOO thick foam.

After the cup settles the foam will thicken at the surface - now your guests
can spoil the effect by adding sugar!

Hope this helps

Simon Wilson
London UK




 
Date: 18 May 2007 16:04:33
From: ramboorider@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Latte Art
On May 18, 5:05 pm, Gary B <n...@this.address > wrote:
> On 17 May 2007 08:39:33 -0700, Stevo wrote:
>
> > Hi! Anyone into latte art? Any tips on making them? Why can't I find
> > cafes in the UK that can make latte art?
> > Stevo
>
> Hi Stevo,
>
> I'm not particularly good at it, but I still try with each cup. The best
> tip I can offer is to make sure you have the milk textured correctly - not
> too firm and merangue-y, but not too liquidy. I'd google for latte art
> videos and see what's around on the web. There are also DVD's around that
> demonstrate the art.
>
> Regards, Gary

Yeah, the milk texture is key. And then you've got to get the wrist
wiggle down when pouring - easier said than done. I find that if the
milk is right, I can get a reasonably decent heart pretty frequently
and I'll occasionally stumble onto a recognizable apple. I'll come up
with a really poor example of a tree or leaf about once a month or so.
And the milk is only that dead-on about half the time. Everything
pretty much has to be right and there's a lot that can go wrong. Fun
to play around with though.

-Ray



 
Date: 19 May 2007 07:05:57
From: Gary B
Subject: Re: Latte Art
On 17 May 2007 08:39:33 -0700, Stevo wrote:

> Hi! Anyone into latte art? Any tips on making them? Why can't I find
> cafes in the UK that can make latte art?
> Stevo

Hi Stevo,

I'm not particularly good at it, but I still try with each cup. The best
tip I can offer is to make sure you have the milk textured correctly - not
too firm and merangue-y, but not too liquidy. I'd google for latte art
videos and see what's around on the web. There are also DVD's around that
demonstrate the art.

Regards, Gary


 
Date: 18 May 2007 07:14:41
From: Ross Wentworth
Subject: Re: Latte Art
stephen.yeung@gmail.com wrote:
> Hi! Anyone into latte art? Any tips on making them? Why can't I find
> cafes in the UK that can make latte art?
> Stevo
>

I gave latte art a shot. After reviewing the result, I decided to name
it "Ode to bad science fiction movies", specifically, "The Blob".