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Date: 08 Jun 2007 14:03:28
From: bernie
Subject: Making Coffee the Older Way..
This past Monday I drove the 420 miles up to visit my 93 year old dad
and my 89 year old mom. They are always happy to have a visit and it is
always a bittersweet time. Age has taken much of their quality of life,
although having grown up pretty poor in the backwoods of West Virginia
and then making a wonderful life for themselves they are grateful for
each day. My mom has alzheimers so her days are pretty much the same
routine and my dad has been absolutley heroic in making sure her life is
as good as possible. I take my dad out for breakfast so he can see old
friends and catch up with the local oil field news. And we usually take
some time to go up into southern Colorado so he can play the slots which
he enjoys. He has lost much of his eyesight so is always interested in a
running commentary as we drive of how much snowpack is left on the
mountains and how good a lambing season it appears to have been and so
forth. He is a very tired guy who worked very hard all his life so often
he will doze off in the middle of a sentence but I'm always amazed at
what mental acuity he still has, even if it takes him a lot longer to
get to the point or ask the question. We were driving back home after a
good trip to the casino and out of nowhere he asked me how many cups we
got per pound of coffee. About 32 eight oz. cups was my reply. "We used
to get 42 in those big urns." I asked him if he meant the perculators.
"No, those didn't make good coffee. We would throw the coffee in and let
it sit for a time and then filter it out and then run it through two
more times." He knew exactly how the coffee was made, how much ground
coffee to put in for an infusion method and how many times you could run
the water through the grounds. I asked him if it ever seemed too strong.
"Well, if you were making the coffee for the morning it was your
responsibility to make sure it tasted great no matter what. If you
needed more or less time or more or less weight you better have an
excellent pot ready or you'd be looking for a new job that day." He had
gone to work at 14, travelling from his home deep in the WV hills to
Baltimore. He thought having a room above the restaurant with his own
bed and working 7 days at 15hrs a day was just about the best deal a
country boy could get. And he still remembers how important it was to
make the best coffee you could no matter what. I guess thats the way
they used to do things.
Bernie (were I half the man..)




 
Date: 09 Jun 2007 03:39:21
From: Steve
Subject: Re: Making Coffee the Older Way..
On Fri, 08 Jun 2007 14:03:28 -0600, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote:

>(were I half the man..)

He has a son to be proud of.
Thank you for a very nice story.
I've got to go call my Dad...


  
Date: 09 Jun 2007 18:26:46
From:
Subject: Re: Making Coffee the Older Way..
A sweet story. I recently lost my father, and wish I had asked him more
questions. It seemed like he could do everything.
"Steve" <not@use.net > wrote in message
news:p58k6398kmjtf6b2blesdh8s4an09bqt54@4ax.com...
> On Fri, 08 Jun 2007 14:03:28 -0600, bernie <bdigman@zianet.com> wrote:
>
>>(were I half the man..)
>
> He has a son to be proud of.
> Thank you for a very nice story.
> I've got to go call my Dad...




 
Date: 08 Jun 2007 18:14:51
From: Ken Fox
Subject: Re: Making Coffee the Older Way..
"bernie" <bdigman@zianet.com > wrote in message
news:4669b611@nntp.zianet.com...
> This past Monday I drove the 420 miles up to visit my 93 year old dad
> and my 89 year old mom.

Another great story from one of alt.coffee's premier storytellers!

ken




 
Date: 08 Jun 2007 21:50:58
From: theotherjo@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Making Coffee the Older Way..
On Jun 8, 1:03 pm, bernie <bdig...@zianet.com > wrote:
> This past Monday I drove the 420 miles up to visit my 93 year old dad
> and my 89 year old mom. They are always happy to have a visit and it is
> always a bittersweet time. Age has taken much of their quality of life,
> although having grown up pretty poor in the backwoods of West Virginia
> and then making a wonderful life for themselves they are grateful for
> each day. My mom has alzheimers so her days are pretty much the same
> routine and my dad has been absolutley heroic in making sure her life is
> as good as possible. I take my dad out for breakfast so he can see old
> friends and catch up with the local oil field news. And we usually take
> some time to go up into southern Colorado so he can play the slots which
> he enjoys. He has lost much of his eyesight so is always interested in a
> running commentary as we drive of how much snowpack is left on the
> mountains and how good a lambing season it appears to have been and so
> forth. He is a very tired guy who worked very hard all his life so often
> he will doze off in the middle of a sentence but I'm always amazed at
> what mental acuity he still has, even if it takes him a lot longer to
> get to the point or ask the question. We were driving back home after a
> good trip to the casino and out of nowhere he asked me how many cups we
> got per pound of coffee. About 32 eight oz. cups was my reply. "We used
> to get 42 in those big urns." I asked him if he meant the perculators.
> "No, those didn't make good coffee. We would throw the coffee in and let
> it sit for a time and then filter it out and then run it through two
> more times." He knew exactly how the coffee was made, how much ground
> coffee to put in for an infusion method and how many times you could run
> the water through the grounds. I asked him if it ever seemed too strong.
> "Well, if you were making the coffee for the morning it was your
> responsibility to make sure it tasted great no matter what. If you
> needed more or less time or more or less weight you better have an
> excellent pot ready or you'd be looking for a new job that day." He had
> gone to work at 14, travelling from his home deep in the WV hills to
> Baltimore. He thought having a room above the restaurant with his own
> bed and working 7 days at 15hrs a day was just about the best deal a
> country boy could get. And he still remembers how important it was to
> make the best coffee you could no matter what. I guess thats the way
> they used to do things.
> Bernie (were I half the man..)

Ahh yes the older days.
I have fallen head over heals for everything coffee. Even though I
only drink a strong cup once in the morning, I am as much addicted to
the smell and the thought of coffee as anything else. Now my partner
and I are starting up a small craft roasting business. I look forward
to bringing back the idea of " The best coffee you can do no matter
what" as you say. Our grandparents and there parents roasted there own
coffee and now today there is a renewed interest in home roasting.
It's an art and pleasure that is coming back in to it's own. The youth
of today has no idea of what your father speaks of. I do because I'm
58 years old and some of my customers are between 80 and 90 years old.
As long as I'm on this green earth I want to keep alive the storys
like your dad's and what better way to do that then over a cup of some
of the best coffee no matter what.
Thank you for sharing.
Jose Javaho
or just Joe