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Date: 30 Nov 2006 19:06:05
From: Marshall
Subject: Midwest Coffee
Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with someone from the
Midwest who claimed it was impossible or impractical to get good,
commercially roasted coffee in the Midwest. The debate devolved into
ever-narrowing definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."

So, I thought it was interesting to see Ken Davids' 2006 edition of
his "12 Best Coffees of the Year." 6 of the 12 coffees (representing 4
roasters) came from the Midwest. The roasters were Coffee Emergency
(Lincoln), Intelligentsia (Chicago), Paradise (MN) and The Roasterie
(KC).

Coffees shown here:
http://www.fastcompany.com/slideshow/slideviewer.cgi?list=12-best-coffee-2006&dir=&config=&refresh=15&direction=forward&scale=0&cycle=on&slide=13&design=default&total=14

shall "not all great roasters are on the Coasts"




 
Date: 04 Dec 2006 10:52:57
From: Filmdave
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee

Lloyd Parsons wrote:
> In article <gta2n2huvmln6p7cvhvnlah0edrjt0042r@4ax.com>,
> Barry Jarrett <barry@rileys-coffee.com> wrote:
>
> > On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 23:17:40 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
> > <lloydparsons@mac.com> wrote:
> >
> > >Hold it, I live just a few miles from Carbondale and I know of exactly
> > >zero roasters there. So who is doing it and why are they hiding?
> >
> > i don't remember. we had someone in the shop yesterday who works for
> > a cafe in carbondale which does some roasting (his parents live down
> > the street from our shop in belleville).
> >
> > if you're near carbondale, you qualify as "neighbor"! ;)
>
> Hmm...
>
> I'll need to do some perusing around and see just who that is. They do
> have a couple of coffee shops over there, but I wasn't aware of any
> roasting going on.
>
The one that setup in the old building on the square was roasting for
awhile, don't know if they are still there, however Melange is
consistently good, I don't remember where they are getting their beans,
but they are always good. Longbranch has slipped in quality since sold
a few years ago, but I haven't been in there recently, so it may be
better now.



 
Date: 03 Dec 2006 10:26:53
From: Felix
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
shall writes:
> I never recommended superkets as a great spot to find
> fresh roasted coffee. Superkets are a much tougher nut
> to for the roasters to crack than coffee shops.

You do emphasize looking for coffee shops that buy beans from good
roasters, but I don't think you explicitly excluded superkets until
now. With superkets roasting on-site, the distinction is subtle.

> You play by their rules or you don't play at all. I think
> Intelly has pretty much given up on Whole Foods around L.A.

I also have experience with non-superket resellers in Chicago, but
maybe we can agree that they aren't "quality coffee shops." Still, I'd
be wary of relying on a shop's delivery schedule. Sometimes there's a
delay, an outage, or ...

Sometimes, you have to choose between buying an older pound, a variety
you don't like very much, wasting a trip, or not supporting a business
you care about. Even at Intelligentsia's own store, I've bought coffee
that was a week old.


Felix



 
Date: 02 Dec 2006 15:33:13
From: Felix
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
Lloyd Parsons writes:
> I'm finding that while I think I'm aging quite well, [...]

Fortunately (?), my insanity isn't the delusional kind. Though anyone
who's heard me claim that I'll eventually reassemble one of my grinders
would probably disagree.

> As to the coffee, it is as much curiousity as anything else.
> I mean, I roast my own and think I do a hell of a job of it.

I occasionally coax some beans from a home roaster, to see if the tools
and techniques have evolved to the point where I should supplement my
roasted purchases with green ones. If you'd like to sell me some,
please send me email.


Felix



  
Date: 02 Dec 2006 17:43:26
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <1165102393.303811.54560@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com >,
"Felix" <felixyen@hotmail.com > wrote:

> Lloyd Parsons writes:
> > I'm finding that while I think I'm aging quite well, [...]
>
> Fortunately (?), my insanity isn't the delusional kind. Though anyone
> who's heard me claim that I'll eventually reassemble one of my grinders
> would probably disagree.
>
> > As to the coffee, it is as much curiousity as anything else.
> > I mean, I roast my own and think I do a hell of a job of it.
>
> I occasionally coax some beans from a home roaster, to see if the tools
> and techniques have evolved to the point where I should supplement my
> roasted purchases with green ones. If you'd like to sell me some,
> please send me email.
>
>
> Felix

Thanks for asking, but my roasters are of the very small capacity type
and I haven't even thought about roasting for others. Well other than
the stuff I give away at times.

If you're ever in deep southern Illinois, let me know and I can at least
give you enough to whet your appetite for roasting your own.

For info, I have a FreshRoast +8 and a Zach & Dani (now Nesco).

Lloyd


 
Date: 02 Dec 2006 14:58:48
From: Randy R
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee

Lloyd Parsons wrote:
> >
> > What was the name of the shop? I haven't had coffee from The Roasterie
> > in a while and Lee's Summit isn't too much of a drive for me.
> > Most places I have been to use coffee from PT's.
> >
> > Randy R
>
> I think it was Docs or something like that. It is on 291 going towards
> Harrisonville in a little strip mall. If you are on 291 go to the
> Greenwood exit (I think that is 150), take it right and the little strip
> mall is up on the right.

Thanks for the quick reply!

Randy R



 
Date: 02 Dec 2006 14:53:12
From: Felix
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
Lloyd Parsons admits:
> I made the claim, [...]
>
> I don't know what I was thinking when I made it, other than
> in the rural parts of the midwest, a small roaster is damn
> hard, if not impossible to find. That I'll stay with.

I thought your claim was weaker than shall's sumy, but if you
felt that strongly ... more power to you :-)

> But in the big city, it is different...

Sometimes it's easy to buy coffee here in Chicago. For example, people
who work in the Loop can shop at Intelligentsia's cafes without much
difficulty. And the Red line stops two short blocks from Metropolis
(though the train is usually almost empty that far North). I have beans
from both of these roasters in my freezer. On the other hand, I haven't
met anyone who shares shall's confidence in Intelligentsia's
"roaster outlets." For example, I bought some fruit at Whole Foods on
my way home from work last night, stopping at the Intelligentsia
display on my way to the produce section. I picked up a bag, looking
for some indication of its age. There's a best-before date sticker on
the bottom ...

Good luck in Carbondale!


Felix



  
Date: 02 Dec 2006 23:50:59
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On 2 Dec 2006 14:53:12 -0800, "Felix" <felixyen@hotmail.com > wrote:

>Lloyd Parsons admits:
>> I made the claim, [...]
>>
>> I don't know what I was thinking when I made it, other than
>> in the rural parts of the midwest, a small roaster is damn
>> hard, if not impossible to find. That I'll stay with.
>
>I thought your claim was weaker than shall's sumy, but if you
>felt that strongly ... more power to you :-)
>
>> But in the big city, it is different...
>
>Sometimes it's easy to buy coffee here in Chicago. For example, people
>who work in the Loop can shop at Intelligentsia's cafes without much
>difficulty. And the Red line stops two short blocks from Metropolis
>(though the train is usually almost empty that far North). I have beans
>from both of these roasters in my freezer. On the other hand, I haven't
>met anyone who shares shall's confidence in Intelligentsia's
>"roaster outlets." For example, I bought some fruit at Whole Foods on
>my way home from work last night, stopping at the Intelligentsia
>display on my way to the produce section. I picked up a bag, looking
>for some indication of its age. There's a best-before date sticker on
>the bottom ...

I never recommended superkets as a great spot to find fresh roasted
coffee. Superkets are a much tougher nut to for the roasters to
crack than coffee shops. You play by their rules or you don't play at
all. I think Intelly has pretty much given up on Whole Foods around
L.A.

What I actually suggested was that people find quality coffee shops
and ask them who supplies them and when. I had a really fine Intelly
espresso at Pazzo Gelato in Silver Lake (L.A.) this week. I didn't ask
if they sold by the pound. I was too immersed in the Valhrona
chocolate gelato.

shall


   
Date: 04 Dec 2006 01:40:01
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 23:50:59 GMT, shall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

>What I actually suggested was that people find quality coffee shops
>and ask them who supplies them and when. I had a really fine Intelly
>espresso at Pazzo Gelato in Silver Lake (L.A.) this week. I didn't ask
>if they sold by the pound. I was too immersed in the Valhrona
>chocolate gelato.


Went back to Pazzo Gelato today. They sell Intelligentsia coffees by
the pound and half pound ($14 and $7). I have no idea what their
freshness policy is.

shall


  
Date: 02 Dec 2006 17:01:35
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <1165099992.078372.194990@80g2000cwy.googlegroups.com >,
"Felix" <felixyen@hotmail.com > wrote:

> Lloyd Parsons admits:
> > I made the claim, [...]
> >
> > I don't know what I was thinking when I made it, other than
> > in the rural parts of the midwest, a small roaster is damn
> > hard, if not impossible to find. That I'll stay with.
>
> I thought your claim was weaker than shall's sumy, but if you
> felt that strongly ... more power to you :-)
>
> > But in the big city, it is different...
>
> Sometimes it's easy to buy coffee here in Chicago. For example, people
> who work in the Loop can shop at Intelligentsia's cafes without much
> difficulty. And the Red line stops two short blocks from Metropolis
> (though the train is usually almost empty that far North). I have beans
> from both of these roasters in my freezer. On the other hand, I haven't
> met anyone who shares shall's confidence in Intelligentsia's
> "roaster outlets." For example, I bought some fruit at Whole Foods on
> my way home from work last night, stopping at the Intelligentsia
> display on my way to the produce section. I picked up a bag, looking
> for some indication of its age. There's a best-before date sticker on
> the bottom ...
>
> Good luck in Carbondale!
>
>
> Felix

Uh, with the coeds or the coffee?? ;-)

I'm finding that while I think I'm aging quite well, I'm missing some
allure that those coeds are looking for...

As to the coffee, it is as much curiousity as anything else. I mean, I
roast my own and think I do a hell of a job of it.


 
Date: 02 Dec 2006 14:49:11
From: Randy R
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee

Lloyd Parsons wrote:
>
> It was me...
>
> I had the opportunity to give the Roasterie's product a try at a small
> coffee shop in Lee's Summit (a suburb). This particular shop is very
> particular about freshness and the coffee he was grinding was within a
> week of roasting.
>
> Delicious!

What was the name of the shop? I haven't had coffee from The Roasterie
in a while and Lee's Summit isn't too much of a drive for me.
Most places I have been to use coffee from PT's.

Randy R



  
Date: 02 Dec 2006 16:53:22
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <1165099751.412485.243770@j72g2000cwa.googlegroups.com >,
"Randy R" <rrostie@gmail.com > wrote:

> Lloyd Parsons wrote:
> >
> > It was me...
> >
> > I had the opportunity to give the Roasterie's product a try at a small
> > coffee shop in Lee's Summit (a suburb). This particular shop is very
> > particular about freshness and the coffee he was grinding was within a
> > week of roasting.
> >
> > Delicious!
>
> What was the name of the shop? I haven't had coffee from The Roasterie
> in a while and Lee's Summit isn't too much of a drive for me.
> Most places I have been to use coffee from PT's.
>
> Randy R

I think it was Docs or something like that. It is on 291 going towards
Harrisonville in a little strip mall. If you are on 291 go to the
Greenwood exit (I think that is 150), take it right and the little strip
mall is up on the right.


 
Date: 01 Dec 2006 20:20:28
From: Felix
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
shall recalls:
> Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with
> someone from the Midwest who claimed it was impossible
> or impractical to get good, commercially roasted coffee
> in the Midwest. The debate devolved into ever-narrowing
> definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."

If we're thinking about the same discussion, who suggested that such
purchases were impossible or impractical? Perhaps you could provide a
link to a posting that makes this claim.


Felix



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 22:24:46
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <1165033228.797179.25270@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com >,
"Felix" <felixyen@hotmail.com > wrote:

> shall recalls:
> > Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with
> > someone from the Midwest who claimed it was impossible
> > or impractical to get good, commercially roasted coffee
> > in the Midwest. The debate devolved into ever-narrowing
> > definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."
>
> If we're thinking about the same discussion, who suggested that such
> purchases were impossible or impractical? Perhaps you could provide a
> link to a posting that makes this claim.
>
>
> Felix

I made the claim, but if you just have to find it, use google groups...
;-)

I don't know what I was thinking when I made it, other than in the rural
parts of the midwest, a small roaster is damn hard, if not impossible to
find. That I'll stay with.

But in the big city, it is different...


   
Date: 02 Dec 2006 04:54:15
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 22:24:46 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
<lloydparsons@mac.com > wrote:

>I don't know what I was thinking when I made it, other than in the rural
>parts of the midwest, a small roaster is damn hard, if not impossible to
>find. That I'll stay with.
>
>But in the big city, it is different...


i guess columbia, carbondale, champaign, bloomington, topeka,
watertown, lodi, and spring grove are all big cities now?

--barry "just the ones i can think of right now"


    
Date: 01 Dec 2006 23:17:40
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <ub12n2lpcejnag4jur0qjhsnq9pt9ek0in@4ax.com >,
Barry Jarrett <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:

> On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 22:24:46 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
> <lloydparsons@mac.com> wrote:
>
> >I don't know what I was thinking when I made it, other than in the rural
> >parts of the midwest, a small roaster is damn hard, if not impossible to
> >find. That I'll stay with.
> >
> >But in the big city, it is different...
>
>
> i guess columbia, carbondale, champaign, bloomington, topeka,
> watertown, lodi, and spring grove are all big cities now?
>
> --barry "just the ones i can think of right now"

Hold it, I live just a few miles from Carbondale and I know of exactly
zero roasters there. So who is doing it and why are they hiding?


     
Date: 02 Dec 2006 07:37:50
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 23:17:40 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
<lloydparsons@mac.com > wrote:

>Hold it, I live just a few miles from Carbondale and I know of exactly
>zero roasters there. So who is doing it and why are they hiding?

i don't remember. we had someone in the shop yesterday who works for
a cafe in carbondale which does some roasting (his parents live down
the street from our shop in belleville).

if you're near carbondale, you qualify as "neighbor"! ;)



      
Date: 02 Dec 2006 08:09:23
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <gta2n2huvmln6p7cvhvnlah0edrjt0042r@4ax.com >,
Barry Jarrett <barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:

> On Fri, 01 Dec 2006 23:17:40 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
> <lloydparsons@mac.com> wrote:
>
> >Hold it, I live just a few miles from Carbondale and I know of exactly
> >zero roasters there. So who is doing it and why are they hiding?
>
> i don't remember. we had someone in the shop yesterday who works for
> a cafe in carbondale which does some roasting (his parents live down
> the street from our shop in belleville).
>
> if you're near carbondale, you qualify as "neighbor"! ;)

Hmm...

I'll need to do some perusing around and see just who that is. They do
have a couple of coffee shops over there, but I wasn't aware of any
roasting going on.

Downside is I'll be forced to look at coeds! <VBG >


       
Date: 14 Dec 2006 21:03:57
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 08:09:23 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
<lloydparsons@mac.com > wrote:

>I'll need to do some perusing around and see just who that is. They do
>have a couple of coffee shops over there, but I wasn't aware of any
>roasting going on.


the guy was in again the other night: crossroads coffee.


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Date: 30 Nov 2006 20:40:01
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 19:06:05 GMT, shall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

>Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with someone from the
>Midwest who claimed it was impossible or impractical to get good,
>commercially roasted coffee in the Midwest.

shall,

"Some men are just as sure of the truth of their opinions as are
others of what they know" - Aristotle.

We all get the same lunacy on sundry topics :
- English cooking is awful
- the French are snobs
- American beer
- California wines are oakey
- *$ makes the 'best' _coffee_

Don't argue with ID ten Ts. Life's too short.


 
Date: 30 Nov 2006 14:13:57
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <oeaum25e8egpcjof831vi1lr2tlbu6975h@4ax.com >,
shall <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

> Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with someone from the
> Midwest who claimed it was impossible or impractical to get good,
> commercially roasted coffee in the Midwest. The debate devolved into
> ever-narrowing definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."
>
> So, I thought it was interesting to see Ken Davids' 2006 edition of
> his "12 Best Coffees of the Year." 6 of the 12 coffees (representing 4
> roasters) came from the Midwest. The roasters were Coffee Emergency
> (Lincoln), Intelligentsia (Chicago), Paradise (MN) and The Roasterie
> (KC).
>
> Coffees shown here:
> http://www.fastcompany.com/slideshow/slideviewer.cgi?list=12-best-coffee-2006&
> dir=&config=&refresh=15&direction=forward&scale=0&cycle=on&slide=13&design=def
> ault&total=14
>
> shall "not all great roasters are on the Coasts"

It was me...

I had the opportunity to give the Roasterie's product a try at a small
coffee shop in Lee's Summit (a suburb). This particular shop is very
particular about freshness and the coffee he was grinding was within a
week of roasting.

Delicious!


  
Date: 30 Nov 2006 20:24:09
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 14:13:57 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
<lloydparsons@mac.com > wrote:

>In article <oeaum25e8egpcjof831vi1lr2tlbu6975h@4ax.com>,
> shall <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net> wrote:
>
>> Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with someone from the
>> Midwest who claimed it was impossible or impractical to get good,
>> commercially roasted coffee in the Midwest. The debate devolved into
>> ever-narrowing definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."
>>
>> So, I thought it was interesting to see Ken Davids' 2006 edition of
>> his "12 Best Coffees of the Year." 6 of the 12 coffees (representing 4
>> roasters) came from the Midwest. The roasters were Coffee Emergency
>> (Lincoln), Intelligentsia (Chicago), Paradise (MN) and The Roasterie
>> (KC).
>>
>> Coffees shown here:
>> http://www.fastcompany.com/slideshow/slideviewer.cgi?list=12-best-coffee-2006&
>> dir=&config=&refresh=15&direction=forward&scale=0&cycle=on&slide=13&design=def
>> ault&total=14
>>
>> shall "not all great roasters are on the Coasts"
>
>It was me...
>
>I had the opportunity to give the Roasterie's product a try at a small
>coffee shop in Lee's Summit (a suburb). This particular shop is very
>particular about freshness and the coffee he was grinding was within a
>week of roasting.
>
>Delicious!

You're welcome.

shall


   
Date: 30 Nov 2006 15:00:02
From: Lloyd Parsons
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
In article <8dfum2tm2ik8140r2i32ge30j5amajq2hp@4ax.com >,
shall <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

> On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 14:13:57 -0600, Lloyd Parsons
> <lloydparsons@mac.com> wrote:
>
> >In article <oeaum25e8egpcjof831vi1lr2tlbu6975h@4ax.com>,
> > shall <mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net> wrote:
> >
> >> Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with someone from the
> >> Midwest who claimed it was impossible or impractical to get good,
> >> commercially roasted coffee in the Midwest. The debate devolved into
> >> ever-narrowing definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."
> >>
> >> So, I thought it was interesting to see Ken Davids' 2006 edition of
> >> his "12 Best Coffees of the Year." 6 of the 12 coffees (representing 4
> >> roasters) came from the Midwest. The roasters were Coffee Emergency
> >> (Lincoln), Intelligentsia (Chicago), Paradise (MN) and The Roasterie
> >> (KC).
> >>
> >> Coffees shown here:
> >> http://www.fastcompany.com/slideshow/slideviewer.cgi?list=12-best-coffee-20
> >> 06&
> >> dir=&config=&refresh=15&direction=forward&scale=0&cycle=on&slide=13&design=
> >> def
> >> ault&total=14
> >>
> >> shall "not all great roasters are on the Coasts"
> >
> >It was me...
> >
> >I had the opportunity to give the Roasterie's product a try at a small
> >coffee shop in Lee's Summit (a suburb). This particular shop is very
> >particular about freshness and the coffee he was grinding was within a
> >week of roasting.
> >
> >Delicious!
>
> You're welcome.
>
> shall

Thank you (I forgot to do that)


 
Date: 30 Nov 2006 20:04:17
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Midwest Coffee
On Thu, 30 Nov 2006 19:06:05 GMT, shall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

>Several weeks ago I had an extended debate here with someone from the
>Midwest who claimed it was impossible or impractical to get good,
>commercially roasted coffee in the Midwest. The debate devolved into
>ever-narrowing definitions of the "Midwest" and "metropolitan areas."
>

that's just silly.

brewed or espressed coffee might be tricky to find, but there are
quite a number of roasters who put out decent beans, and quite a few
who put out excellent beans.

--barry "appalachians to rockies, and between"