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Date: 29 Dec 2006 11:22:25
From: JC Dill
Subject: Mild roast coffee beans, and storing coffee beans
My sweetie doesn't have the budget (or the desire) to buy fresh
roasted coffee every week, or to roast his own. He usually buys "dark
roast" coffee from Trader Joe's ($12 for a 26 oz can), or from Costco
(don't have the pricing off-hand).

I recently picked up a few 1/2 lb bags of fresh roasted coffee beans
from Ritual in SF. WOW, what a difference. But as noted above, we
don't have the budget to buy fresh roasted beans from Ritual week in
and week out (plus it's not convenient, we don't get to SF every
week). If I were to buy beans from Ritual or other fresh-roasted
source, they would either get stale (older than 8 days) before they
were all used up, or I'd have to store them in the freezer.

So what I'm looking for are recommendations for a vaccuum-packed
milder roast coffee bean (similar to the roast from Ritual) at a low
price point, similar to the price for coffee beans from TJs. Please
use your "this is what I'd recommend to my mom/dad/aunt who
can't/won't roast their own or buy weekly and who can't/won't pay
fresh roasted prices" filter and let me know what you come up with!

Do you find that storing vaccuum-packed beans in the freezer (after
you have opened the vaccuum packing) makes any difference in the
quality of the coffee? What about storing fresh-roasted beans (e.g.
beans from Ritual) in the freezer? The roaster at Ritual gave me a
friendly "just use it within 8 days" answer when I asked him about
freezing the beans for longer storage.

Finally, in this scenaio, how much does it matter to grind the beans
right before use, as opposed to grinding them the night before (and
using the automatic timer on the drip coffee pot)?

Thanks Tons!!!

jc

--

"The nice thing about a e is you get to ride a lot
of different horses without having to own that many."
~ Eileen Morgan of The e's Nest, PA




 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 14:16:52
From: Don C.
Subject: Re: Mild roast coffee beans, and storing coffee beans
One regret I have, actually the only regret, of becoming a
home-roasting coffee enthusiast is that I can no longer make use of the
timer function on my brewer since it would require letting my coffee go
undrinkably stale overnight. Funny but I didn't mind before I knew
better.

Oh yeah, another regret is that I can almost never enjoy a decent after
dinner cup of coffee at a restaurant. I now have to wait until I get
home.



On Dec 29, 2:22 pm, JC Dill <jcd...@gmail.com > wrote:
> My sweetie doesn't have the budget (or the desire) to buy fresh
> roasted coffee every week, or to roast his own. He usually buys "dark
> roast" coffee from Trader Joe's ($12 for a 26 oz can), or from Costco
> (don't have the pricing off-hand).
>
> I recently picked up a few 1/2 lb bags of fresh roasted coffee beans
> from Ritual in SF. WOW, what a difference. But as noted above, we
> don't have the budget to buy fresh roasted beans from Ritual week in
> and week out (plus it's not convenient, we don't get to SF every
> week). If I were to buy beans from Ritual or other fresh-roasted
> source, they would either get stale (older than 8 days) before they
> were all used up, or I'd have to store them in the freezer.
>
> So what I'm looking for are recommendations for a vaccuum-packed
> milder roast coffee bean (similar to the roast from Ritual) at a low
> price point, similar to the price for coffee beans from TJs. Please
> use your "this is what I'd recommend to my mom/dad/aunt who
> can't/won't roast their own or buy weekly and who can't/won't pay
> fresh roasted prices" filter and let me know what you come up with!
>
> Do you find that storing vaccuum-packed beans in the freezer (after
> you have opened the vaccuum packing) makes any difference in the
> quality of the coffee? What about storing fresh-roasted beans (e.g.
> beans from Ritual) in the freezer? The roaster at Ritual gave me a
> friendly "just use it within 8 days" answer when I asked him about
> freezing the beans for longer storage.
>
> Finally, in this scenaio, how much does it matter to grind the beans
> right before use, as opposed to grinding them the night before (and
> using the automatic timer on the drip coffee pot)?
>
> Thanks Tons!!!
>
> jc
>
> --
>
> "The nice thing about a e is you get to ride a lot
> of different horses without having to own that many."
> ~ Eileen Morgan of The e's Nest, PA



  
Date: 29 Dec 2006 20:17:36
From: Mike Hartigan
Subject: Re: Mild roast coffee beans, and storing coffee beans
In article <1167430612.679981.14020@a3g2000cwd.googlegroups.com >,
DonRCummings@gmail.com says...
> One regret I have, actually the only regret, of becoming a
> home-roasting coffee enthusiast is that I can no longer make use of the
> timer function on my brewer since it would require letting my coffee go
> undrinkably stale overnight. Funny but I didn't mind before I knew
> better.
>
> Oh yeah, another regret is that I can almost never enjoy a decent after
> dinner cup of coffee at a restaurant. I now have to wait until I get
> home.

Indeed! It's most noticeable at my favorite Sunday pancake house. I
simply don't enjoy the coffee with my breakfast anymore. A worse
problem, however, is when we're invited to friends' homes for the
evening. This almost always includes some sort of pastry and coffee.
I do enjoy the pastry.

--
-Mike


  
Date: 29 Dec 2006 17:48:36
From: yetanotherBob
Subject: Re: Mild roast coffee beans, and storing coffee beans
I'll definitely go along with that.

Still, we go ahead and order it after a nice meal and if it's good, we
enjoy it, and when it's not, we leave it untouched. If the opportunity
presents itself, we'll make a comment one way or the other to someone on
the staff.

It's so iffy in most places that if one serves an even half-decent cup
of coffee, they get an extra ticky k in the mental + column.

Btw, one particularly nasty thing we've encountered more and more of
late is the contamination of what's supposed to be a plain cup of coffee
with the various flavorings places offer. Unless the food is simply
stellar, those places just get scratched off the list.

Bob [the snob]
========================
In article <1167430612.679981.14020@a3g2000cwd.googlegroups.com >,
DonRCummings@gmail.com says...
>
> Oh yeah, another regret is that I can almost never enjoy a decent after
> dinner cup of coffee at a restaurant. I now have to wait until I get
> home.
>
>
>


 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 15:00:16
From: yetanotherBob
Subject: Re: Mild roast coffee beans, and storing coffee beans
In article <2hjap2dm2lj80hp4b2q17t84g987r2arnq@4ax.com >,
jcdill@gmail.com says...
>
> Finally, in this scenaio, how much does it matter to grind the beans
> right before use, as opposed to grinding them the night before (and
> using the automatic timer on the drip coffee pot)?
>
>
I think the consensus is that the single best thing you can do to
improve the coffee you make at home is to grind your own beans, vs.
buying pre-ground coffee of any sort. Following from that, the less
time between grinding the beans and brewing the coffee, the better the
results will be.

To my nose, fresh ground coffee, even from store-bought beans roasted
who-knows-when, smells great, and even the freshest roasted beans, once
ground and left to sit around for an hour or two, smell nasty. For me,
these differences carry over to the taste of the brewed coffee as well.

Bob


 
Date: 29 Dec 2006 11:31:24
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Mild roast coffee beans, and storing coffee beans
JC Dill wrote:

> My sweetie doesn't have the budget (or the desire) to buy fresh
> roasted coffee every week, or to roast his own. He usually buys "dark
> roast" coffee from Trader Joe's ($12 for a 26 oz can), or from Costco
> (don't have the pricing off-hand).

Does your Costco roast right in the store? They do in Seattle. A good
option for those who don't want to roast their own. I think the stock
sells fast enough that it doesn't sit TOO long.


>
> I recently picked up a few 1/2 lb bags of fresh roasted coffee beans
> from Ritual in SF. WOW, what a difference. But as noted above, we
> don't have the budget to buy fresh roasted beans from Ritual week in
> and week out (plus it's not convenient, we don't get to SF every
> week). If I were to buy beans from Ritual or other fresh-roasted
> source, they would either get stale (older than 8 days) before they
> were all used up, or I'd have to store them in the freezer.
>
> So what I'm looking for are recommendations for a vaccuum-packed
> milder roast coffee bean (similar to the roast from Ritual) at a low
> price point, similar to the price for coffee beans from TJs. Please
> use your "this is what I'd recommend to my mom/dad/aunt who
> can't/won't roast their own or buy weekly and who can't/won't pay
> fresh roasted prices" filter and let me know what you come up with!
>
> Do you find that storing vaccuum-packed beans in the freezer (after
> you have opened the vaccuum packing) makes any difference in the
> quality of the coffee? What about storing fresh-roasted beans (e.g.
> beans from Ritual) in the freezer? The roaster at Ritual gave me a
> friendly "just use it within 8 days" answer when I asked him about
> freezing the beans for longer storage.
>
> Finally, in this scenaio, how much does it matter to grind the beans
> right before use, as opposed to grinding them the night before (and
> using the automatic timer on the drip coffee pot)?
>
> Thanks Tons!!!
>
> jc
>