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Date: 08 Aug 2007 22:50:44
From: Ed
Subject: Milk Frothing Questions
First, if there is a FAQ or good source of info, please feel free to
direct me there.

My questions:

1. Is frothing for cappucino different than for latte?

2. I am looking for a good description (detailed) of the differences
between latte, cappucino, etc.

Any help is appreciated.

Thanks-
Ed





 
Date: 13 Aug 2007 21:56:10
From: Janice Baker
Subject: Re: Milk Frothing Questions
Ed,

One of my favorite websites to visit is www.coffeegeek.com I have learned so
much from that site. They have an entire section dedicated to milk, steaming
vs foaming, and milk science.

There most certainly is a difference in the way milk should be steamed for
cappuccinos and lattes. By definition, lattes should only have a thin layer
of foamed (or frothed) milk on top, whereas a traditional cappuccino is 1/3
espresso, 1/3 steamed milk, and 1/3 foamed milk.

Jan

"Ed" <efaerman@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1186613444.273722.104820@r34g2000hsd.googlegroups.com...
> First, if there is a FAQ or good source of info, please feel free to
> direct me there.
>
> My questions:
>
> 1. Is frothing for cappucino different than for latte?
>
> 2. I am looking for a good description (detailed) of the differences
> between latte, cappucino, etc.
>
> Any help is appreciated.
>
> Thanks-
> Ed
>




 
Date: 09 Aug 2007 15:03:04
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Milk Frothing Questions
On Aug 8, 6:50 pm, Ed <efaer...@gmail.com > wrote:
> First, if there is a FAQ or good source of info, please feel free to
> direct me there.
>
> My questions:
>
> 1. Is frothing for cappucino different than for latte?
>
> 2. I am looking for a good description (detailed) of the differences
> between latte, cappucino, etc.
>
> Any help is appreciated.
>
> Thanks-
> Ed


A cosmetic description. Count the ways there are to aerate milk, and
it's basically the same. Time length, wetness of the steam, whether
then poured over a shot - however formed, inasmuch a basic concept
derived from achieving a smooth consistency of micro-foam.

I like it opposite to traditional recipes - with the milk frothed and
prepared first, and the shot extracted over milk - the exception being
South America, where drinks are served in the above fashion for an
attractiveness of coffee offset within colloidal suspension.

None of that. After extracting I stir together the lower two layers
(with a fork), not disturbing the upper layer of froth. Milk is also
at a minimum, nearer by equal proportion to coffee extracted. An
approximation also closer to a proportion dairy is added to a brewed
cup of coffee, were espresso considered merely a more "concentrated"
form of a cup of coffee derived from otherwise equal bean masses
(discounting optimal extraction).

But, back to the point. Milk serves for a convenient canvas to
highlight and judge from a white reflecting contrast, creama captured
in foam, illustrating transparency as an expressive quality of
progression during the shot. With less milk, as taste experience,
it's less conspicuous to subtle and nuance flavors for an adulterated
espresso.



 
Date: 08 Aug 2007 16:48:37
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: Milk Frothing Questions
On Wed, 08 Aug 2007 22:50:44 -0000, Ed <efaerman@gmail.com > wrote:

>First, if there is a FAQ or good source of info, please feel free to
>direct me there.
>
>My questions:
>
>1. Is frothing for cappucino different than for latte?
>
>2. I am looking for a good description (detailed) of the differences
>between latte, cappucino, etc.
>
>Any help is appreciated.
>
>Thanks-
>Ed

search for "milk frothing guide" there are many resources.

The problem is what works best for one machine may not necessarily
work best on another.

Additionally, milk changes over the year and from location to
location.

Best advice :
Read several guides
Buy gallon of milk
Froth