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Date: 10 Apr 2007 16:21:02
From:
Subject: Moka Pot questions
I've picked up a 9 cup Pezzetti Moka pot (alum) at a thrift store and
am getting some really bitter coffee from it. I've read a lot of
great info here and have tried it all. I am using preheated water,
removing the pot early, using low heat. I have noticed that when it
starts to gurgle and push coffee up top, there is some steam coming
from the pressure valve. Is this normal? It sure takes a long time
to get any coffee up top, over 10 min. The valve looks to be just a
small brass ball against a spring. Do these springs wear out and
weaken? I'm using my home roasted beans that taste good through my
drip setup. Using a blade grinder, can this be the reason? Not
seeing a much in the way of grinds in the cup. There is still water
in the bottom when finished. I'm assuming this is a 9 cup unit, it
holds about 18 oz. up to the pressure valve. Thanks is advance for
your help.





 
Date: 12 Apr 2007 03:30:06
From: BoldJava
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
I would toss that moka pot in the recycling bin if it is leaking at
the valve and you don't have a valve to replace it. Talk to others
who have had the moka blow up on them. Not nice.

Spring for the $30 and spare yourself re: aggravation.

DB




 
Date: 11 Apr 2007 06:40:43
From:
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
On Apr 11, 7:16 am, "Coffee Contact" <cof...@nb.aibn.com > wrote:
> "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net> wrote in message
>
> news:HtKdndkuCPRbo4HbnZ2dnUVZ_hisnZ2d@comcast.com...
>
>
>
> > Moka pressure valve should not leak. Replacement valves are available but
> > god knows where.
>
> I needed to replace one a few years back and had to order a dozen - still
> have 11 left. I think there is only one size valve in the various machines
> I have had.
>
> Terry M
> coffeecont...@yahoo.com


I removed the valve and it is very easy to push the little ball open
against the spring. I can do it with my fingernail. Does this seem
weak? Terry, wanna part with one of your 11 valves? The pot does
work, when steam is made, it will put water through the grinds and up
into the top pot and most of the water will be gone from the bottom.
The question is, is it operating at its full potential or is it
running a lower pressure because the valve is weak?

thanks,
Brent



  
Date: 11 Apr 2007 19:06:46
From: Coffee Contact
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
<bratz@pldi.net > wrote in message
news:1176298842.980429.51350@y80g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...
>
> I removed the valve and it is very easy to push the little ball open
> against the spring. I can do it with my fingernail. Does this seem
> weak? Terry, wanna part with one of your 11 valves? The pot does
> work, when steam is made, it will put water through the grinds and up
> into the top pot and most of the water will be gone from the bottom.
> The question is, is it operating at its full potential or is it
> running a lower pressure because the valve is weak?
>
> thanks,
> Brent
>

If there is steam coming out of the valve something is wrong. One possible
cause could be that there is an obstruction to the water flow, note that
previous replies suggested cleaning and grind . Remove top screen and check
that the holes are not plugged and the pipe is not blocked. If you are
using too fine of grind it could also slow down the flow, try making a pot
with no coffee. If you need a valve, send me an e-mail.

Terry M
coffeecontact@yahoo.com




 
Date: 10 Apr 2007 21:50:00
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
I hope you got a really good deal on it because it generally doesn't pay to
mess with old funky moka pots when new ones are so cheap. I was in a
"Marshall's" store today and they were selling the Bialetti Venus all
stainless 6 cup moka for $20.


Moka pressure valve should not leak. Replacement valves are available but
god knows where. It probably needs cleaning and the gaskets are suspect and
in older alu. mokas the threads go also, so unless it was in "like new"
condition I wouldn't buy it even at a thrift store price.

A blade grinder will NOT do - you are probably clogging the thing and that's
why it's leaking out the valve. If you don't own a quality espresso grinder,
buy a brick of preground Italian "espresso" such as Lavazza. This is the
perfect grind for this use. Even if you don't like the coffee it will show
you the exact fineness that is needed. Fill the basket to the top and mound
slightly over but do not tamp.

Some water will always remain in the bottom.





<bratz@pldi.net > wrote in message
news:1176247262.870866.241890@y80g2000hsf.googlegroups.com...
> I've picked up a 9 cup Pezzetti Moka pot (alum) at a thrift store and
> am getting some really bitter coffee from it. I've read a lot of
> great info here and have tried it all. I am using preheated water,
> removing the pot early, using low heat. I have noticed that when it
> starts to gurgle and push coffee up top, there is some steam coming
> from the pressure valve. Is this normal? It sure takes a long time
> to get any coffee up top, over 10 min. The valve looks to be just a
> small brass ball against a spring. Do these springs wear out and
> weaken? I'm using my home roasted beans that taste good through my
> drip setup. Using a blade grinder, can this be the reason? Not
> seeing a much in the way of grinds in the cup. There is still water
> in the bottom when finished. I'm assuming this is a 9 cup unit, it
> holds about 18 oz. up to the pressure valve. Thanks is advance for
> your help.
>
>




  
Date: 11 Apr 2007 12:16:02
From: Coffee Contact
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:HtKdndkuCPRbo4HbnZ2dnUVZ_hisnZ2d@comcast.com...
>
> Moka pressure valve should not leak. Replacement valves are available but
> god knows where.

I needed to replace one a few years back and had to order a dozen - still
have 11 left. I think there is only one size valve in the various machines
I have had.

Terry M
coffeecontact@yahoo.com




 
Date: 10 Apr 2007 18:28:48
From: LF
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
On Apr 10, 7:21 pm, b...@pldi.net wrote:
> I've picked up a 9 cup Pezzetti Moka pot (alum) at a thrift store and
> am getting some really bitter coffee from it.

How clean is the moka? They can get very funky. Old coffee residue
in a pot can make for bitter coffee. I find moka's difficult to clean
-- lots of places for coffee residue to hide. So far, Jack Denver's
suggestion for using *Barkeepers Friend* to clean aluminum coffee
brewers works better for me than anything else.
Best Regards,
Larry



  
Date: 10 Apr 2007 22:01:16
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
It's funny - I must have given that advice so long ago that I have no
recollection of giving it. It's still a good product. It's a scouring
powder like Ajax/Comet,etc. but it contains a "secret ingredient" (oxalic
acid) which makes it very useful for metal cleaning. I wouldn't use it on
anything with a mirror finish because it may scratch, but for a funky old
moka, scrub away. And you do have to scrub with some elbow grease - it
doesn't work by itself.


"LF" <fieman@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1176254928.137385.264280@y5g2000hsa.googlegroups.com...
> On Apr 10, 7:21 pm, b...@pldi.net wrote:
>> I've picked up a 9 cup Pezzetti Moka pot (alum) at a thrift store and
>> am getting some really bitter coffee from it.
>
> How clean is the moka? They can get very funky. Old coffee residue
> in a pot can make for bitter coffee. I find moka's difficult to clean
> -- lots of places for coffee residue to hide. So far, Jack Denver's
> suggestion for using *Barkeepers Friend* to clean aluminum coffee
> brewers works better for me than anything else.
> Best Regards,
> Larry
>
>




   
Date: 11 Apr 2007 06:11:04
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote:



 
Date: 10 Apr 2007 17:20:15
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Moka Pot questions
On Apr 10, 7:21 pm, b...@pldi.net wrote:
> I've picked up a 9 cup Pezzetti Moka pot (alum) at a thrift store and
> am getting some really bitter coffee from it. I've read a lot of
> great info here and have tried it all. I am using preheated water,
> removing the pot early, using low heat. I have noticed that when it
> starts to gurgle and push coffee up top, there is some steam coming
> from the pressure valve. Is this normal? It sure takes a long time
> to get any coffee up top, over 10 min. The valve looks to be just a
> small brass ball against a spring. Do these springs wear out and
> weaken? I'm using my home roasted beans that taste good through my
> drip setup. Using a blade grinder, can this be the reason? Not
> seeing a much in the way of grinds in the cup. There is still water
> in the bottom when finished. I'm assuming this is a 9 cup unit, it
> holds about 18 oz. up to the pressure valve. Thanks is advance for
> your help.

Once it starts boiling you can hear it. Once it starts boiling its
going to start brewing, bubbling over into the top chamber, which is
fast. If it's not - there's problems. A little lose steam isn't a
problem, normal for the gasket fit between the upper and lower
chambers, un-normal at the relief. The 'ol spring and ball, eh. . .
Mine's not like that (seems it's a pop-out plunger and can be reset).

I bought a mokapot and dialed in, (rather forgot to change to coarser
grinds), very fine grinds, but with a better grinder than blade. Did
it ever taste good. But - espresso machine is a lot easier to work
with and also makes a fine tasting cup -- so MP's been pretty much
relegated to a stovetop ornamental.

Too hot, too fine, too long, mix all together for a receipe for
bitter. Once the water boils it should go through the coffee
relatively fast, under a minute. Offhand, I'd suspect the pot before
the blades.