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Date: 27 Aug 2007 18:55:34
From: Moka Java
Subject: Monsooned Malabar
I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually
the unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for
blending and roasting are appreciated.

R "ready for a crama explosion" TF




 
Date: 29 Aug 2007 08:21:56
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
Moka Java wrote:
> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually
> the unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for
> blending and roasting are appreciated.
>
> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF

Than you for all of your suggestions and artful comments. Synthesizing
all of it and responding in one post, first, these beans or not moldy,
shriveled, Sailored, or brown. The MM beans are large, evenly sized,
light in weight, have no junk or readily apparent defects and have a
light golden color rather than the green we usually see with unroasted
beans. These beans were purchased through the Green Coffee Coop
www.greencoffee.coop and are likely the best available of this variety.
(The Green Coffee Coop is a not for profit volunteer organization that
sources and distributes beans to home roasters. They don't have to have
product to sell. They buy limited quantities of high end green coffee
and sell to members at cost plus the expenses of packing and shipping.
The beans are sampled by experienced and articulate tasters and the
descriptions are very good and decidedly unromantic.)

My experience with roasting Malabar Gold was a dismal failure. Pro
roasted Malabar Gold is very good in milk based drinks but I find it
very intense as a straight shot. It makes me wince which is rather
embarrassing when it's Dr. John who is handing you the shot and watching
for your reaction.

I agree that roasting a pre-blend would likely be a challenge. These
beans are large and light weight. I roast 10 oz. batches with a heat
gun in a dog bowl which yields about 8 oz. of finished product. I have
plenty of this coffee to play around with and post roast blending is
fun. So far I've roasted 2 batches of MM, the first batch to 2nd crack
and the next batch a minute or so into 2nd crack. The longer roast
isn't appreciably darker but the beans are shiny.

I also roasted a Panama SHB Boquette which is fairly bright and acidic.
and have a DP Yirg. that is bright and fruity at light roast levels.
So there's lots of variations to play around with as a brewed cup and
espresso.

R "I didn't know what a sailored bean was but with the help of Bill, who
has channeled Herman Melville, I am now enlightened" TF


  
Date: 03 Sep 2007 08:47:34
From: Bertie Doe
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar

"Moka Java" wrote in message
>> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually the
>> unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for blending
>> and roasting are appreciated.
>>

> I roast 10 oz. batches with a heat gun in a dog bowl which yields about 8
> oz. of finished product. I have plenty of this coffee to play around with
> and post roast blending is fun. So far I've roasted 2 batches of MM, the
> first batch to 2nd crack and the next batch a minute or so into 2nd crack.
> The longer roast isn't appreciably darker but the beans are shiny.
>

From your 2 MM roasts, I would prefer the one minute into 2nd and for my
taste buds, I go for the cooler end of the brew cycle. Anyway how did they
taste?

Bertie




   
Date: 04 Sep 2007 09:06:33
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
Bertie Doe wrote:
> "Moka Java" wrote in message
>>> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually the
>>> unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for blending
>>> and roasting are appreciated.
>>>
>
>> I roast 10 oz. batches with a heat gun in a dog bowl which yields about 8
>> oz. of finished product. I have plenty of this coffee to play around with
>> and post roast blending is fun. So far I've roasted 2 batches of MM, the
>> first batch to 2nd crack and the next batch a minute or so into 2nd crack.
>> The longer roast isn't appreciably darker but the beans are shiny.
>>
>
> From your 2 MM roasts, I would prefer the one minute into 2nd and for my
> taste buds, I go for the cooler end of the brew cycle. Anyway how did they
> taste?
>
> Bertie
>
>
Since you asked, there;'s really not much that I like about it. I roast
with a heat gun so I'm really in the roast with all the sights, smells
and sounds. The pops were quite violent with a few beans jumping out of
the high walled 96 oz bowl. Most coffees smell pretty pleasant while
roasting but the MM has an acrid, not so pleasant scent. Not so bad as
to turn me away but not attractive either. The roasted coffee smells
both acrid and musty. Dry aroma after grinding is reminiscent of
freshly cut mahogany saw dust, woodsy mixed with tropical bog. As
brewed coffee it's mushy, musty and flat. If I was served a cup in a
diner I wouldn't finish it without copious amounts of milk and sugar.

The straight espresso shot is pure crema in the glass that quickly
settles into a thick foamy golden brown head that's perhaps 15% of the
total volume of a 1.5 oz double. Mind you, I get the same crema from
freshly roasted dry processed coffees, e.g., Yemen, Harrar. Taste,
well, I've never actually tasted old sweat socks but this is what I
imagine old sweat socks taste like. Blended with other coffees for
espresso it increases the crema but adds a flavor that's hard to
describe but is like an acrid edge that otherwise degrades the high
quality SO coffees that I have here. The only advantage I see to MM is
that it cuts through milk and somehow brightens the flavor of the drink.
Go figure. MM does not have the burnt rubber odor and taste of other
robusta coffees.

The bottom line is, MM is really not for me. At this point I have
several pounds of the stuff that I don't want or need. My cost was a
little over $3 per lb. If anyone is interested I'll be happy to pass it
along at $3 per pound plus actual shipping costs. Email at rtwatches at
yahoo dot com. Just to be clear, this is green coffee that must be roasted.

R "the grinder has been cleaned" TF


    
Date: 04 Sep 2007 20:32:38
From: Bertie Doe
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar

"Moka Java" wrote in message.
<snip >
>
> The bottom line is, MM is really not for me. At this point I have several
> pounds of the stuff that I don't want or need. My cost was a little over
> $3 per lb. If anyone is interested I'll be happy to pass it along at $3
> per pound plus actual shipping costs. Email at rtwatches at yahoo dot
> com. Just to be clear, this is green coffee that must be roasted.
>

They say of Monsooned and Kona '...you either love em' or hate em' Well MM
is my fav but I find Kona a little too bright for my liking. Perhaps my
taste buds have got immune over the years. I drink it with sugar and
sometimes a little coffee whitener but no foamed milk. $3 per lb is a good
price, so you shouldn't have probs offloading it. Good luck.

BD




 
Date: 28 Aug 2007 17:31:21
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
1. I don't think it lends itself well to pre-blends becasue the beans are so
light and expanded. Roast by crack sounds and not by color because it will
not get very dark.

2. Keep it to no more than 25% of an espresso blend (and that's what you
use it for). You'll get lots of body but also the characteristy "musty"/
peanut taste.

3. Allow it to age (in the freezer is OK) for several days before using.
Resist the temptation to use any sooner.

4. You may or may not like it anyway - it's not everyone's cup of tea.


"Moka Java" <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com > wrote in message
news:5jh35dF3u27qaU1@mid.individual.net...
>I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually the
>unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for blending and
>roasting are appreciated.
>
> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF
>




  
Date: 28 Aug 2007 17:41:32
From: Craig Andrews
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:3Mudne2xZaK0CUnbnZ2dnUVZ_hadnZ2d@comcast.com...
> 1. I don't think it lends itself well to pre-blends becasue the beans are
> so light and expanded. Roast by crack sounds and not by color because it
> will not get very dark.
>
> 2. Keep it to no more than 25% of an espresso blend (and that's what you
> use it for). You'll get lots of body but also the characteristy "musty"/
> peanut taste.
>

It's a MAJOR component of Dr. John's Malabar Gold!
Craig.



   
Date: 29 Aug 2007 10:17:11
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
The exception makes the rule. I gather that Dr. John did a lot of work to
come up with a pre-blend that included MM and still worked. You can't throw
together some random beans with 50% MM and expect to have a pre-blend that
works either in terms of taste or evenness of roast.

6. MM blends stand up well to milk. You may prefer them in milk drinks
instead of in straight espresso.



"Craig Andrews" <alt.coffee@deletethis.rogers.com > wrote in message
news:5jjj4aF3ts2e1U1@mid.individual.net...
>
> "Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net> wrote in message
> news:3Mudne2xZaK0CUnbnZ2dnUVZ_hadnZ2d@comcast.com...
>> 1. I don't think it lends itself well to pre-blends becasue the beans are
>> so light and expanded. Roast by crack sounds and not by color because it
>> will not get very dark.
>>
>> 2. Keep it to no more than 25% of an espresso blend (and that's what you
>> use it for). You'll get lots of body but also the characteristy "musty"/
>> peanut taste.
>>
>
> It's a MAJOR component of Dr. John's Malabar Gold!
> Craig.




  
Date: 28 Aug 2007 17:34:26
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
5. Balance with acidic coffees because it has no acid of its own. High grown
centrals (CR), Kenya ,etc.

"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote in message
news:3Mudne2xZaK0CUnbnZ2dnUVZ_hadnZ2d@comcast.com...
> 1. I don't think it lends itself well to pre-blends becasue the beans are
> so light and expanded. Roast by crack sounds and not by color because it
> will not get very dark.
>
> 2. Keep it to no more than 25% of an espresso blend (and that's what you
> use it for). You'll get lots of body but also the characteristy "musty"/
> peanut taste.
>
> 3. Allow it to age (in the freezer is OK) for several days before using.
> Resist the temptation to use any sooner.
>
> 4. You may or may not like it anyway - it's not everyone's cup of tea.
>
>
> "Moka Java" <rtwatches@fishyahoo.com> wrote in message
> news:5jh35dF3u27qaU1@mid.individual.net...
>>I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually the
>>unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for blending
>>and roasting are appreciated.
>>
>> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF
>>
>
>




 
Date: 28 Aug 2007 08:25:54
From: Joe
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
On Aug 27, 5:55 pm, Moka Java <rtwatc...@fishyahoo.com > wrote:
> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually
> the unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for
> blending and roasting are appreciated.
>
> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF

How is Monsooned Malabar imported? IIRC The customs and FDA rules
state no moldy, sriveled, Sailored, or brown beans are allowed into
the USA.

Joe



  
Date: 29 Aug 2007 00:21:28
From: Lucygrace
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
Joe wrote:
> On Aug 27, 5:55 pm, Moka Java <rtwatc...@fishyahoo.com> wrote:
>> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually
>> the unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for
>> blending and roasting are appreciated.
>>
>> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF
>
> How is Monsooned Malabar imported? IIRC The customs and FDA rules
> state no moldy, sriveled, Sailored, or brown beans are allowed into
> the USA.
>
> Joe
>
okay,
LG <---- asking for enlightenment...
what is a sailored bean?

LG



   
Date: 29 Aug 2007 08:34:36
From: Bill (Adopt)
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
In article <3z6Bi.77501$EK3.46101@fe107.usenetserver.com >,
Lucygrace <lucygrace@bellsouth.net > wrote:
> Joe wrote:
> > On Aug 27, 5:55 pm, Moka Java <rtwatc...@fishyahoo.com> wrote:
> >> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green,
[..]

> okay,
> LG <---- asking for enlightenment...
> what is a sailored bean?

Perhaps a bean that, having lain in it's monsoon-
lashed Shipper's Yard, awaiting transportion in
a ghost clipper ship over thousands of miles of
through the rain-lashed oceans the of world,
braving all the cruel elements..

..a bean pickled in Mother Nature's condensation
and subject the dankest delights of wet tropical
heat, copiously washed in Nature's Waters only
added by those other elemental natural ingredients,
Strontium 90 and other heavy metals, drenched with
the Smog of the World..

..a bean sat on by sailors, exhausted after a hard
day's night toiling in the rigging - and an even
harder night's day with coffee and poker - a bean
lashed in it's hessian deck sacks by the Monsoon
storms..

..a pale bean that has leached a number of it's
Monsooned component flavinoids into Mother Earth
as it has sat there quietly, in it's Hessian of
Destiny, awaiting the rain-lashed deck of of a
Clipper transportation, journeyed to it's final
home..

..a bean, a sad bean, a hasbean, a monsoon-washed
bean, a bean wetly awaiting it's lonely fate in
crackling flame, with majesty ground down by the
Mill of Attrition, to have it's very fibre so fully
and forcefully extracted by the dread and unknowing
Machine of the Barista, an Inheritor born of the
Cradle of Calloused Humanity..

..a bean with the pale golden glow of a promise
yet to be attained ..a destiny yet to be fulfilled.....

;))

Bill ZFC

--
Adoption InterLink UK with -=- http://www.billsimpson.com/
Domain Host Orpheus Internet -=- http://www.orpheusinternet.co.uk/


    
Date: 29 Aug 2007 07:47:29
From: Godzilla
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
Bill (Adopt) wrote:

> In article <3z6Bi.77501$EK3.46101@fe107.usenetserver.com>,
> Lucygrace <lucygrace@bellsouth.net> wrote:
>> Joe wrote:
>> > On Aug 27, 5:55 pm, Moka Java <rtwatc...@fishyahoo.com> wrote:
>> >> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green,
> [..]
>
>> okay,
>> LG <---- asking for enlightenment...
>> what is a sailored bean?
>
> Perhaps a bean that, having lain in it's monsoon-
> lashed Shipper's Yard, awaiting transportion in
> a ghost clipper ship over thousands of miles of
> through the rain-lashed oceans the of world,
> braving all the cruel elements..
>
> ..a bean pickled in Mother Nature's condensation
> and subject the dankest delights of wet tropical
> heat, copiously washed in Nature's Waters only
> added by those other elemental natural ingredients,
> Strontium 90 and other heavy metals, drenched with
> the Smog of the World..
>
> ..a bean sat on by sailors, exhausted after a hard
> day's night toiling in the rigging - and an even
> harder night's day with coffee and poker - a bean
> lashed in it's hessian deck sacks by the Monsoon
> storms..
>
> ..a pale bean that has leached a number of it's
> Monsooned component flavinoids into Mother Earth
> as it has sat there quietly, in it's Hessian of
> Destiny, awaiting the rain-lashed deck of of a
> Clipper transportation, journeyed to it's final
> home..
>
> ..a bean, a sad bean, a hasbean, a monsoon-washed
> bean, a bean wetly awaiting it's lonely fate in
> crackling flame, with majesty ground down by the
> Mill of Attrition, to have it's very fibre so fully
> and forcefully extracted by the dread and unknowing
> Machine of the Barista, an Inheritor born of the
> Cradle of Calloused Humanity..
>
> ..a bean with the pale golden glow of a promise
> yet to be attained ..a destiny yet to be fulfilled.....
>
> ;))
>
> Bill ZFC
>

In other words, to put it simply "A has bean." ;-)

Godzilla


  
Date: 28 Aug 2007 12:04:19
From: Neal Reid
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
In article
<1188314754.314439.231520@r34g2000hsd.googlegroups.com >,
Joe <steelredcloud@yahoo.com > wrote:

> How is Monsooned Malabar imported? IIRC The customs and FDA rules
> state no moldy, sriveled, Sailored, or brown beans are allowed into
> the USA.

So who said anything about " moldy, sriveled, Sailored, or brown
beans"? The MM beans appear quite normal to my eye (although
lighter than some).

IMHO the taste is unique. I have difficulty describing it - but I
think I can tell if a blend has more than about 30% MM in it as
the flavour begins to dominate. I THINK I can identify lessor
amounts but have been unable to set up blind tests to insure so.

I've been playing with it for a while now and still haven't
decided whether I LIKE it or not - but I do believe I've learned
to identify it...

--
M for N in address to mail reply


   
Date: 28 Aug 2007 10:23:03
From: markB
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
From Neal Reid, on 8/28/2007 9:04 AM:
> In article <1188314754.314439.231520@r34g2000hsd.googlegroups.com>,
> Joe <steelredcloud@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> How is Monsooned Malabar imported? IIRC The customs and FDA rules
>> state no moldy, sriveled, Sailored, or brown beans are allowed into
>> the USA.
>
> So who said anything about " moldy, sriveled, Sailored, or brown
> beans"? The MM beans appear quite normal to my eye (although lighter
> than some).
>
> IMHO the taste is unique. I have difficulty describing it - but I
> think I can tell if a blend has more than about 30% MM in it as the
> flavour begins to dominate. I THINK I can identify lessor amounts but
> have been unable to set up blind tests to insure so.

It's not difficult to describe. Think sweatsocks worn for a week then
sealed in a jar for a month. Add hot water, shake well. Let sit for
another month. Enjoy!

> I've been playing with it for a while now and still haven't decided
> whether I LIKE it or not - but I do believe I've learned to identify
> it...

It's interesting to add the equivalent of a few beans per double to
almost any blend, despite my description :)

-mb


    
Date: 28 Aug 2007 16:34:08
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 10:23:03 -0700, markB <mb@netweb.net > wrote:

>It's not difficult to describe. Think sweatsocks worn for a week then
>sealed in a jar for a month. Add hot water, shake well. Let sit for
>another month. Enjoy!
>

yep, "dirty gym socks" is usually my first thought when someone
mentions MM.


 
Date: 28 Aug 2007 06:13:43
From: nosnhojn
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
I drink the monsooned malabar as SO espresso... I'm sure that'll get a
strange look or two. It does have a bit of an odd flavour but I
suppose I've developed a taste for it. I've tried a fullcity+ at
barely into second crack and find it a bit *too* odd. I've made my way
to 20-25 seconds into second crack (maybe calling it vienna though
with a relatively untrained eye and beans that roast a little lighter
it's hard to tell for sure??) and for me, it's the most enjoyable. It
has lots more body than all the other beans I've tried. I've tried
blending it but in the end found that it was easier and tastier to
drink it unblended.



  
Date: 29 Aug 2007 11:44:38
From: Bertie Doe
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar

"Craig Andrews" <alt.coffee@deletethis.rogers.com > wrote in message
news:5jjj4aF3ts2e1U1@mid.individual.net...
>
> "Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net> wrote in message
> news:3Mudne2xZaK0CUnbnZ2dnUVZ_hadnZ2d@comcast.com...
>> 1. I don't think it lends itself well to pre-blends becasue the beans are
>> so light and expanded. Roast by crack sounds and not by color because it
>> will not get very dark.
>>

> It's a MAJOR component of Dr. John's Malabar Gold!
> Craig.
>

I would agree with Jack and say, you would be lucky to pre-blend in a small
capacity roaster and get each componant to roast to perfection, all in the
same time-frame. Dr John's MG is a bit unique. I've roasted 2 x half pound
and it is indeed a rare blend, that's ok for pre-blending. I bet it took a
few years of research to get the right marriage. A bit has been written
about SO blending with MM, where you mix say, FC+ with LtVienna etc and it's
well worth a try.

>"nosnhojn" wrote in message

> barely into second crack and find it a bit *too* odd. I've made my way
> to 20-25 seconds into second crack (maybe calling it vienna though
> with a relatively untrained eye and beans that roast a little lighter
> it's hard to tell for sure??) and for me, it's the most enjoyable. It
> has lots more body than all the other beans I've tried. I've tried
> blending it but in the end found that it was easier and tastier to
> drink it unblended.
>

About 50% of all my roasts are MM (sad) and I prefer to go 20 - 40 secs into
rolling2 (even sadder) to Lt Vienna. For my taste buds, MM dosen't work with
a ristretto shot. In fact, I find that a faster shot (say 20 secs) seems to
give a smoother cup.

Bertie




 
Date: 28 Aug 2007 15:00:21
From: Ivo van der Putten
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
Moka Java schreef:
> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually
> the unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for
> blending and roasting are appreciated.
>
> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF

Monsooned coffees are famous for their lack of acidity.
If you like that, don't blend, if you don't, choose a coffee with good
acidity, Kenya, Papua New Guinea or the like.

But maybe you like it as a single .. ?

Ivo


  
Date: 28 Aug 2007 16:01:18
From: North Sullivan
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
On Tue, 28 Aug 2007 15:00:21 +0200, Ivo van der Putten
<ivdputten@gmail.nl > wrote:

>Moka Java schreef:
>> I just received a shipment of Monsooned Malabar green, well, actually
>> the unroasted beans are more of a gold color. Any suggestions for
>> blending and roasting are appreciated.
>>
>> R "ready for a crama explosion" TF
>
>Monsooned coffees are famous for their lack of acidity.
>If you like that, don't blend, if you don't, choose a coffee with good
>acidity, Kenya, Papua New Guinea or the like.
>
>But maybe you like it as a single .. ?
>
>Ivo

I'm seeing some "faces" that I haven't seen for awhile. Very cool.

North Sullivan
(alt.coffee: still alive and kickin')



 
Date: 28 Aug 2007 12:52:42
From: Ken Wilson
Subject: Re: Monsooned Malabar
The Brits used to be famous for liking monsoon malabar. Of course, it was a
necessity thing - it took a long time to sail from a coffee place to up
here somewhere and inevitably the coffee got a bit aged. Ok, now they do it
by leaving in drying sheds or, IIRC, burying it for a year or so but the
principle stays the same.


So i feel i ought to like it.

That other famous brit, James Bond, liked Jamaican Blue Mountain. He
obviously has a better sense of taste.

Look - MM is earthy and mushroomy - sweetmarias used to have a poem about it
calling it "funky". Think of Davy Jones from Pirates of Caribbean.

Anyway, when i succumb, - i roast it to beginning of 2nd for cafetiere.
and after 2 or 3 of those my mouth feels somewhat "unhealthy". So i then
mix it with something light and fluffy like a costa rican, roast it a bit
darker and espresso it.

and resolve not ot buy it again.

Ken