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Date: 29 Jan 2007 20:43:41
From: Curt Nelson
Subject: Newbie (and possibly novel) MOKA pot questions.
Hi everybody:

I have a couple of newbie questions that I'm posting here because after
searching this group and Google in general, the results are varied and
fairly overwhelming and it seems to me that it may be better to ask the
pros:

I just discovered stovetop espresso contraptions recently. They seem to work
well, but slow on an electric burner. So, I have an electric kettle for tea
and found that if I turn on my stovetop electric burner first and boil the
proper amount of water in the kettle while the burner is warming up and then
pour the hot water into my MOKA(ish) pot and then place the assembled
contraption it onto the (now heated) burner, the whole process takes place
almost immediately and I now have a seemingly damn good cup of coffee in
only a few seconds.

Question is, is this sort of method safe? I've read a few things here and
there about people having stovetop contraptions explode. I'm not a
worry-wart and I'm not really *that* concerned about my safety... my regular
job is considerably more dangerous for me than to be overly concerned about
a coffee pot. However, I am concerned that one of these damn things could
injure one of my comrades, which is unacceptable.

Is there truly a danger of explosion or are the stories merely a matter of
people not paying attention? Is it an issue of too much heat? If so, please
explain.

This is my first (and most likely last) appearance here, however your
knowledge would be much appreciated by all. I'm also interested in your
thoughts of my technique of using an electric kettle and burner combo to get
the fastest results.

Thank you,
Curt Nelson






 
Date: 30 Jan 2007 06:23:19
From: Danny
Subject: Re: Newbie (and possibly novel) MOKA pot questions.
Curt Nelson wrote:
> Hi everybody:
>
> I have a couple of newbie questions that I'm posting here because after
> searching this group and Google in general, the results are varied and
> fairly overwhelming and it seems to me that it may be better to ask the
> pros:
>
> I just discovered stovetop espresso contraptions recently. They seem to work
> well, but slow on an electric burner. So, I have an electric kettle for tea
> and found that if I turn on my stovetop electric burner first and boil the
> proper amount of water in the kettle while the burner is warming up and then
> pour the hot water into my MOKA(ish) pot and then place the assembled
> contraption it onto the (now heated) burner, the whole process takes place
> almost immediately and I now have a seemingly damn good cup of coffee in
> only a few seconds.
>
> Question is, is this sort of method safe? I've read a few things here and
> there about people having stovetop contraptions explode. I'm not a
> worry-wart and I'm not really *that* concerned about my safety... my regular
> job is considerably more dangerous for me than to be overly concerned about
> a coffee pot. However, I am concerned that one of these damn things could
> injure one of my comrades, which is unacceptable.
>
> Is there truly a danger of explosion or are the stories merely a matter of
> people not paying attention? Is it an issue of too much heat? If so, please
> explain.
>
> This is my first (and most likely last) appearance here, however your
> knowledge would be much appreciated by all. I'm also interested in your
> thoughts of my technique of using an electric kettle and burner combo to get
> the fastest results.
>
> Thank you,
> Curt Nelson
>
>

As long as you aren't heating the moka pot with no water in it should
be safe. I'd not want to boil the water - hot but not boiling water
would be ideal.

--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



 
Date: 29 Jan 2007 21:04:32
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Newbie (and possibly novel) MOKA pot questions.
Yes, it's safe according to Italian standards. There's a pressure
relief valvue on the boiler underneath, and if it fails, pressure need
overcome the tensile strength of alumnimum structure, aside from any
loose fittings mated to the upper chamber. I daresay you may have
some time to notice things appear somewhat sedentary before the
explosion actually occurs. Another other option is using them directly
beneath various open gas combustion sources. Aluminum is not going to
be a happy camper under natural gas, which is why a heat plate fitting
is recommended to disperse focal gas combustion. A milder instance,
as the pot will simply loose its integrity without further ado.

I'm figuring I'll use a microwave to bring water near 100C. Haven't
bought an apartment cooking hotplate for the boil, yet. Waiting first
to give one a try.

"I'll make him an offer he can't refuse.' -The Godfather