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Date: 21 Oct 2006 12:36:25
From: Mr Moto
Subject: One cup brewing HOW?
I am very frustrated in the fact that no matter what I do I can't make
a good 16 oz cup of coffee. I go to a coffee shop and see them roast
the beans, I buy a pound freshly roasted coffee, take it home, boil 24
oz water in a pot, remove it from the heat , add 5 or 6 tablespoons of
coffee, let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling, I
pour it thru a #4 melitta filter into a 16 oz. cup. The cup that I
make tastes no where near as good as the same cup that I get at the
coffee shop.
So, please tell me what I am doing wrong or tell me how to brew a 16
oz cup of coffee that tastes as good as the coffee from the coffee
shop.






 
Date: 22 Oct 2006 23:58:28
From: razmoo
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?

Steve Ackman wrote:
> Well, there's another discrepancy. At the shop,
> you're getting coffee made from freshly ground beans.
> At home, you're making coffee from pre-ground.
> At least one study has shown that coffee begins
> noticeably staling just 18 minutes after grinding.

I think thats being a bit anal.. but yeh.. ok.



  
Date: 23 Oct 2006 11:35:53
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
A big part of the taste of coffee is the smell. When the room is full of
the volatile aromatics from the ground beans, how much do you think it can
lose before the taste is affected?
Fresh roasted beans, brewed within seconds of grinding makes a wonderful
cup. That kind of attention to detail is not important unless you want
absolutely the best. Brewed in a Mr. Coffee, it doesn't make any difference
at all.

(OK, back to reality--I'm not 'sure' I could tell the difference between
coffee ground within seconds and coffee ground 30 minutes, or even an hour
ago, but I 'know' there's a difference, and the difference fills the room
with evidence.)
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"razmoo" <anson.d@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1161586708.830362.241050@e3g2000cwe.googlegroups.com...
>
> Steve Ackman wrote:
>> Well, there's another discrepancy. At the shop,
>> you're getting coffee made from freshly ground beans.
>> At home, you're making coffee from pre-ground.
>> At least one study has shown that coffee begins
>> noticeably staling just 18 minutes after grinding.
>
> I think thats being a bit anal.. but yeh.. ok.
>




   
Date: 23 Oct 2006 21:44:50
From: Danny
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
Ed Needham wrote:
> A big part of the taste of coffee is the smell. When the room is full of
> the volatile aromatics from the ground beans, how much do you think it can
> lose before the taste is affected?
> Fresh roasted beans, brewed within seconds of grinding makes a wonderful
> cup. That kind of attention to detail is not important unless you want
> absolutely the best. Brewed in a Mr. Coffee, it doesn't make any difference
> at all.
>
> (OK, back to reality--I'm not 'sure' I could tell the difference between
> coffee ground within seconds and coffee ground 30 minutes, or even an hour
> ago, but I 'know' there's a difference, and the difference fills the room
> with evidence.)

In the trailer we definitely can. So we've learnt to grind to order
unless busy, when we use the partial autofill mode of the Cimbali Cadet.


--
Regards, Danny

http://www.gaggia-espresso.com (a purely hobby site)
http://www.malabargold.co.uk (UK/EU ordering for Malabar Gold blend)



   
Date: 23 Oct 2006 15:56:19
From: Neal Reid
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In article <WIqdnUnguoHHfKHYnZ2dnUVZ_u-dnZ2d@insightbb.com >,
"Ed Needham" <ed@NOSPAMhomeroaster.com > wrote:

> (OK, back to reality--I'm not 'sure' I could tell the difference between
> coffee ground within seconds and coffee ground 30 minutes, or even an hour
> ago, but I 'know' there's a difference, and the difference fills the room
> with evidence.)

The experiment is easy! I usually measure and grind per shot. I
often 'know' I'm going to want two in a row - so to save time I've
measured 2 shots worth, ground 'em, made and drank one then had
the other. Twenty odd minutes from ground rather than 1 or 2
minutes.

I CAN taste the difference. I do 'em one at a time now...

--
M for N in address to mail reply


   
Date: 23 Oct 2006 14:22:33
From: Harry Moos
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
Is it possible the difference between a shop filled with the odor of brewing
coffee and fresh-baked pastry and the home kitchen that is relatively
odor-free can also affect the taste of the coffee?

"Ed Needham" <ed@NOSPAMhomeroaster.com > wrote in message
news:WIqdnUnguoHHfKHYnZ2dnUVZ_u-dnZ2d@insightbb.com...
>A big part of the taste of coffee is the smell. When the room is full of
>the volatile aromatics from the ground beans, how much do you think it can
>lose before the taste is affected?
> Fresh roasted beans, brewed within seconds of grinding makes a wonderful
> cup. That kind of attention to detail is not important unless you want
> absolutely the best. Brewed in a Mr. Coffee, it doesn't make any
> difference at all.
>
> (OK, back to reality--I'm not 'sure' I could tell the difference between
> coffee ground within seconds and coffee ground 30 minutes, or even an hour
> ago, but I 'know' there's a difference, and the difference fills the room
> with evidence.)
> --
> *********************
> Ed Needham®
> "to absurdity and beyond!"
> http://www.homeroaster.com
> (include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)




    
Date: 24 Oct 2006 01:20:05
From: Ed Needham
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
I would think the entire environment of a coffeehouse could affect the
perception of the coffee.
--
*********************
Ed Needham®
"to absurdity and beyond!"
http://www.homeroaster.com
(include [FRIEND] in subject line to get through my SPAM filters)
*********************

"Harry Moos" <harrym@ruraltel.net > wrote in message
news:Q6udnQbLW7Pni6DYnZ2dnUVZ_u-dnZ2d@news.ruraltel.net...
> Is it possible the difference between a shop filled with the odor of
> brewing coffee and fresh-baked pastry and the home kitchen that is
> relatively odor-free can also affect the taste of the coffee?




  
Date: 23 Oct 2006 08:47:06
From: Moka Java
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
razmoo wrote:

> Steve Ackman wrote:
>
>> Well, there's another discrepancy. At the shop,
>>you're getting coffee made from freshly ground beans.
>>At home, you're making coffee from pre-ground.
>> At least one study has shown that coffee begins
>>noticeably staling just 18 minutes after grinding.
>
>
> I think thats being a bit anal.. but yeh.. ok.
>

Might be, but if you have an espresso machine you can do a simple test
and see a big difference. For press pot or drip I doubt if most people
could tell much of a difference after 18 minutes, but after a few hours
a lot of the volatiles are long gone.

R "soon to be long gone" TF


 
Date: 22 Oct 2006 08:24:02
From: Don C.
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?

Moto wrote:

> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?

Bitter taste typically indicates over-extraction. This is generally a
result of two factors: water too hot and steep time too long.

Probably the biggest issue however is that you are using stale coffee.
Unless you live right next door to the coffee shop then the coffee you
buy from them and have them grind will stale significantly between
their grinder and your Melitta.

Buy a $10 blade grinder! Not an ideal solution but much better than
buying preground.

Also, coffee shops often retail different beans than they grind for
their own brewers. Not different varieties but from different batches.
Ask them to package your purchase from their personal stash. When I
worked at a shop we retailed prepackaged 1 lb versions of our beans.
These had a Best Before expiration of 1 year while the 5 lb bags we
used for inhouse brewing were always younger than 3 months.



  
Date: 22 Oct 2006 17:29:23
From:
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
On 22 Oct 2006 08:24:02 -0700, "Don C." <DonRCummings@gmail.com >
wrote:

>
>Moto wrote:
>
>> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?
>
>Bitter taste typically indicates over-extraction. This is generally a
>result of two factors: water too hot and steep time too long.
>
>Probably the biggest issue however is that you are using stale coffee.
>Unless you live right next door to the coffee shop then the coffee you
>buy from them and have them grind will stale significantly between
>their grinder and your Melitta.

I agree, see my next post




>Buy a $10 blade grinder! Not an ideal solution but much better than
>buying preground.

OK

>Also, coffee shops often retail different beans than they grind for
>their own brewers. Not different varieties but from different batches.
> Ask them to package your purchase from their personal stash. When I
>worked at a shop we retailed prepackaged 1 lb versions of our beans.
>These had a Best Before expiration of 1 year while the 5 lb bags we
>used for inhouse brewing were always younger than 3 months.

This is a small coffee shop, they roast the beans right in front of
you. While I don't talk to the owners I don't think they roast more
than 5 to 10 lbs of the 5 different blends per day. On the bags that
are roasted it say French Roast, Roasted 10/21 ect. for what they have
that day. I have never seen beans that were labeled more that 3 days
old.


 
Date: 22 Oct 2006 04:12:51
From: JulesG
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
Moto wrote:
> In article <1161465268.377102.193060@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
> jules.gobeil@videotron.ca says...
> > 1. Put the dry grounds in the Melita filter - the grounds should be
> > ground fine for Melita filter
> > 2. Boil 2 quarts of water - stop the heat
> > 3. Warm your "cup" for 30 sec. with the water - empty it, put the
> > filter on it
> > 4. Put a little water on the grounds, just enough to dampen the
> > grounds, wait 30 sec.
> > 5. Put water on the grounds, enough to fill the filter 3/4 full, let it
> > filter through, repeat until your "cup" is full
> > 6. Coffee too strong, use less grounds - too weak, use more
> > 7. Still not right - change coffee
> >
> > By the way, 16 oz. is 2 cups...
> >
> >
> I tried this method about a hour ago per your instructions. It tasted ok
> and was not too strong or too weak. But, no matter how I try to brew
> coffee it always tastes bitter which I did not mention in my first post.
>
> To me I can taste the difference from one brew to another in the coffee
> shop. If I happen to buy 2 or 3 different types of freshly roasted
> coffee they all taste the same when I brew them at home and always have
> bitter taste.
>
> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?

I don't think a Melita filter can introduce bitterness. I am an
espresso drinker but we use a Melita filter often at home because it
makes decent conventional coffee, it is easy to make and clean. I have
yet to get bitter coffee with that method.

If all 3 types of freshly roasted coffee taste bitter, you are probably
not doing exactly as I suggest. Here is where you may be wrong:

Your water may be too hot. Make sure you let it cool 30 to 60 sec.
before you use it.
Try using more or less coffee, starting from too weak and increasing
1/4 teaspoon each time.

It it is still bitter, try bottled spring water and ask the coffee shop
to sell you the exact same coffee that they serve (the one you like).

It is also possible that your definition of bitterness may be wrong.
The taste buds that detect bitterness are located at the back of your
tongue, just before the throat.



 
Date: 21 Oct 2006 14:14:28
From: JulesG
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
1. Put the dry grounds in the Melita filter - the grounds should be
ground fine for Melita filter
2. Boil 2 quarts of water - stop the heat
3. Warm your "cup" for 30 sec. with the water - empty it, put the
filter on it
4. Put a little water on the grounds, just enough to dampen the
grounds, wait 30 sec.
5. Put water on the grounds, enough to fill the filter 3/4 full, let it
filter through, repeat until your "cup" is full
6. Coffee too strong, use less grounds - too weak, use more
7. Still not right - change coffee

By the way, 16 oz. is 2 cups...



  
Date: 21 Oct 2006 18:41:31
From: Moto
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In article <1161465268.377102.193060@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com >,
jules.gobeil@videotron.ca says...
> 1. Put the dry grounds in the Melita filter - the grounds should be
> ground fine for Melita filter
> 2. Boil 2 quarts of water - stop the heat
> 3. Warm your "cup" for 30 sec. with the water - empty it, put the
> filter on it
> 4. Put a little water on the grounds, just enough to dampen the
> grounds, wait 30 sec.
> 5. Put water on the grounds, enough to fill the filter 3/4 full, let it
> filter through, repeat until your "cup" is full
> 6. Coffee too strong, use less grounds - too weak, use more
> 7. Still not right - change coffee
>
> By the way, 16 oz. is 2 cups...
>
>
I tried this method about a hour ago per your instructions. It tasted ok
and was not too strong or too weak. But, no matter how I try to brew
coffee it always tastes bitter which I did not mention in my first post.

To me I can taste the difference from one brew to another in the coffee
shop. If I happen to buy 2 or 3 different types of freshly roasted
coffee they all taste the same when I brew them at home and always have
bitter taste.

So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?


   
Date: 22 Oct 2006 00:05:28
From: markB
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
From Moto, on 10/21/2006 6:41 PM:
> In article <1161465268.377102.193060@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
> jules.gobeil@videotron.ca says...
>> 1. Put the dry grounds in the Melita filter - the grounds should be
>> ground fine for Melita filter
>> 2. Boil 2 quarts of water - stop the heat
>> 3. Warm your "cup" for 30 sec. with the water - empty it, put the
>> filter on it
>> 4. Put a little water on the grounds, just enough to dampen the
>> grounds, wait 30 sec.
>> 5. Put water on the grounds, enough to fill the filter 3/4 full, let it
>> filter through, repeat until your "cup" is full
>> 6. Coffee too strong, use less grounds - too weak, use more
>> 7. Still not right - change coffee
>>
>> By the way, 16 oz. is 2 cups...
>>
>>
> I tried this method about a hour ago per your instructions. It tasted ok
> and was not too strong or too weak. But, no matter how I try to brew
> coffee it always tastes bitter which I did not mention in my first post.
>
> To me I can taste the difference from one brew to another in the coffee
> shop. If I happen to buy 2 or 3 different types of freshly roasted
> coffee they all taste the same when I brew them at home and always have
> bitter taste.
>
> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?

If you're not too attached to the Melitta, try a french press. I'll bet
you never go back.

-mb


    
Date: 22 Oct 2006 17:06:43
From:
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 00:05:28 -0700, kB <mb@netweb.net > wrote:

> From Moto, on 10/21/2006 6:41 PM:
>> In article <1161465268.377102.193060@b28g2000cwb.googlegroups.com>,
>> jules.gobeil@videotron.ca says...
>>> 1. Put the dry grounds in the Melita filter - the grounds should be
>>> ground fine for Melita filter
>>> 2. Boil 2 quarts of water - stop the heat
>>> 3. Warm your "cup" for 30 sec. with the water - empty it, put the
>>> filter on it
>>> 4. Put a little water on the grounds, just enough to dampen the
>>> grounds, wait 30 sec.
>>> 5. Put water on the grounds, enough to fill the filter 3/4 full, let it
>>> filter through, repeat until your "cup" is full
>>> 6. Coffee too strong, use less grounds - too weak, use more
>>> 7. Still not right - change coffee
>>>
>>> By the way, 16 oz. is 2 cups...
>>>
>>>
>> I tried this method about a hour ago per your instructions. It tasted ok
>> and was not too strong or too weak. But, no matter how I try to brew
>> coffee it always tastes bitter which I did not mention in my first post.
>>
>> To me I can taste the difference from one brew to another in the coffee
>> shop. If I happen to buy 2 or 3 different types of freshly roasted
>> coffee they all taste the same when I brew them at home and always have
>> bitter taste.
>>
>> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?
>
>If you're not too attached to the Melitta, try a french press. I'll bet
>you never go back.
>
>-mb

It might be my next step, Thanks


   
Date: 22 Oct 2006 02:00:35
From: Alan
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?

"Moto" wrote
[ . . . ]

> To me I can taste the difference from one brew to another in the coffee
> shop. If I happen to buy 2 or 3 different types of freshly roasted
> coffee they all taste the same when I brew them at home and always have
> bitter taste.
>
> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?

Just out of curiosity, how do they brew the coffee in that coffee shop?




    
Date: 22 Oct 2006 17:01:07
From:
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
On Sun, 22 Oct 2006 02:00:35 GMT, "Alan" <in_flagrante@hotmail.com >
wrote:

>
>"Moto" wrote
>[ . . . ]
>
>> To me I can taste the difference from one brew to another in the coffee
>> shop. If I happen to buy 2 or 3 different types of freshly roasted
>> coffee they all taste the same when I brew them at home and always have
>> bitter taste.
>>
>> So, how do I get rid of the bitter taste?
>
>Just out of curiosity, how do they brew the coffee in that coffee shop?
>
I don't know the brand name of the unit. They use a flat bottom filter
with I am guessing about 12 oz of coffee. For lack of a better
description it looks like the units that are in Starbucks.


 
Date: 21 Oct 2006 15:54:32
From: notbob
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
On 2006-10-21, Mr Moto <bcominski@netscape.net > wrote:

> oz water in a pot, remove it from the heat , add 5 or 6 tablespoons of
> coffee, let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling, I
> pour it thru a #4 melitta filter into a 16 oz. cup.

Sounds to me like you are adding the coffee to the pot of water,
letting it sit for 5 mins, then straining it through the Melitta. Is
this what you mean? If so, you are definitely going about it in the
wrong way. The way a Melitta works is you put the coffee in the
Melitta and pour the water over the dry coffee grounds which then
drips into your cup. Brewing time should be no more than a couple
minutes.

nb


  
Date: 21 Oct 2006 18:23:04
From: Moto
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In article <3N6dnYNSdcmVFKfYnZ2dnUVZ_q2dnZ2d@comcast.com >,
notbob@nothome.com says...
> On 2006-10-21, Mr Moto <bcominski@netscape.net> wrote:
>
> > oz water in a pot, remove it from the heat , add 5 or 6 tablespoons of
> > coffee, let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling, I
> > pour it thru a #4 melitta filter into a 16 oz. cup.
>
> Sounds to me like you are adding the coffee to the pot of water,
> letting it sit for 5 mins, then straining it through the Melitta. Is
> this what you mean? If so, you are definitely going about it in the
> wrong way. The way a Melitta works is you put the coffee in the
> Melitta and pour the water over the dry coffee grounds which then
> drips into your cup. Brewing time should be no more than a couple
> minutes.
>
> nb
>
Yes that it what I am doing. I realize that is the wrong way if I was
going with a melitta filter. I should have asked, How to brew coffee in
a pot of water. And a second question about the proper method of brewing
a single cup with the melitta filter. I have tried both methods and more
or less they taste the same & no way close to the taste of the coffee
shop's coffee.


   
Date: 23 Oct 2006 16:05:09
From: notbob
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
On 2006-10-22, Moto <sjc@comcast.net > wrote:


> or less they taste the same & no way close to the taste of the coffee
> shop's coffee.

Brewing coffee for five minutes in sub-boiling water is over
extraction. I recently had this problem with my press pot. I was
using water too hot with too fine a grind. I let the water cool from
boiling for 1 minute and made my grind more coarse. I also limit my
brew to about 2-2.5 mins. Over 3 minutes is too long. This was a
major improvement with some CoE coffee I recently acquired.

nb


 
Date: 21 Oct 2006 16:42:45
From: Steve Ackman
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In <hhrkj212o5jau7m70feqgfauo6cuusa5sf@4ax.com >, on Sat, 21 Oct 2006
12:36:25 -0700, Mr Moto wrote:
> I am very frustrated in the fact that no matter what I do I can't make
> a good 16 oz cup of coffee. I go to a coffee shop and see them roast
> the beans, I buy a pound freshly roasted coffee, take it home, boil 24
> oz water in a pot, remove it from the heat , add 5 or 6 tablespoons of
> coffee, let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling, I
> pour it thru a #4 melitta filter into a 16 oz. cup. The cup that I
> make tastes no where near as good as the same cup that I get at the
> coffee shop.
> So, please tell me what I am doing wrong or tell me how to brew a 16
> oz cup of coffee that tastes as good as the coffee from the coffee
> shop.

1) Grind. Are you using a quality burr grinder? If
so, are you grinding to roughly the same fineness the
shop is?

2) Water. Does your water come from the same place
theirs does? If so, are they using any sort of water
treatment?

3) Brew temp. You say "just below boiling." Without
quantifying that, it's impossible to say whether it's
a factor or not. If "just below boiling" means 211°F,
it's too hot. Their equipment is likely set up to
brew in the 195°F - 205°F range.

4) Coffee to water ratio. While 24 oz. of water is
a pretty consistent mass, "5 or 6 tablespoons" is a
pretty broad target. Even if you said 5.5 TBSP, it
still varies with the density of the individual roast
and bean. A TBSP of light roast will be heavier than
a TBSP of dark roast.
When I worked at a coffee shop, we used .24 lbs. of
grounds for a half-gallon pot of coffee. Most likely
"your" coffee shop is weighing their coffee as well.
If you're not weighing your coffee, that's another step
where you're not duplicating their method. You want to
shoot for roughly a 17:1 water to coffee ratio by
weight.




  
Date: 21 Oct 2006 18:03:44
From: Moto
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In article <slrnejl1i4.1ba0.steve@wizard.dyndns.org >, steve@SNIP-
THIS.twoloonscoffee.com says...
> In <hhrkj212o5jau7m70feqgfauo6cuusa5sf@4ax.com>, on Sat, 21 Oct 2006=20
> 12:36:25 -0700, Mr Moto wrote:
> > I am very frustrated in the fact that no matter what I do I can't make
> > a good 16 oz cup of coffee. I go to a coffee shop and see them roast
> > the beans, I buy a pound freshly roasted coffee, take it home, boil 24
> > oz water in a pot, remove it from the heat , add 5 or 6 tablespoons of
> > coffee, let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling, I
> > pour it thru a #4 melitta filter into a 16 oz. cup. The cup that I
> > make tastes no where near as good as the same cup that I get at the
> > coffee shop. =20
> > So, please tell me what I am doing wrong or tell me how to brew a 16
> > oz cup of coffee that tastes as good as the coffee from the coffee
> > shop.
>=20
> 1) Grind. Are you using a quality burr grinder? If
> so, are you grinding to roughly the same fineness the
> shop is?=20

No, I don't have a grinder. Don't know but my beans are ground for a=20
melitta filter
>=20
> 2) Water. Does your water come from the same place
> theirs does? If so, are they using any sort of water
> treatment?
=09
No. I guess mostly all good coffee shops use a water filter. I have=20
tried tap water, bottled water and filtered water at my house. I don't=20
notice any difference in taste because my brewing methods are way off.

>=20
> 3) Brew temp. You say "just below boiling." Without
> quantifying that, it's impossible to say whether it's
> a factor or not. If "just below boiling" means 211=B0F,=20
> it's too hot. Their equipment is likely set up to=20
> brew in the 195=B0F - 205=B0F range. =20
>

OK I will brew in this range
=20
> 4) Coffee to water ratio. While 24 oz. of water is
> a pretty consistent mass, "5 or 6 tablespoons" is a
> pretty broad target. Even if you said 5.5 TBSP, it
> still varies with the density of the individual roast
> and bean. A TBSP of light roast will be heavier than
> a TBSP of dark roast.
> When I worked at a coffee shop, we used .24 lbs. of=20
> grounds for a half-gallon pot of coffee. Most likely=20
> "your" coffee shop is weighing their coffee as well. =20
> If you're not weighing your coffee, that's another step=20
> where you're not duplicating their method. You want to=20
> shoot for roughly a 17:1 water to coffee ratio by=20
> weight.
>=20
Wow, that deep stuff.=20
>=20


   
Date: 22 Oct 2006 23:52:36
From: Steve Ackman
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In <MPG.1fa46346c1a7a0f12@news-west.giganews.com >, on Sat, 21 Oct 2006
18:03:44 -0700, Moto wrote:
> In article <slrnejl1i4.1ba0.steve@wizard.dyndns.org>, steve@SNIP-
> THIS.twoloonscoffee.com says...

>> 1) Grind. Are you using a quality burr grinder? If
>> so, are you grinding to roughly the same fineness the
>> shop is?
>
> No, I don't have a grinder. Don't know but my beans are ground for a
> melitta filter

Well, there's another discrepancy. At the shop,
you're getting coffee made from freshly ground beans.
At home, you're making coffee from pre-ground.
At least one study has shown that coffee begins
noticeably staling just 18 minutes after grinding.



   
Date: 22 Oct 2006 15:10:13
From: Ken Montgomery
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
I agree completely on the weighing of coffee. I use a Capresso MT500 and
weigh out 43 grams of previously roasted, unground beans to get a full
pot of coffee. When I want, say two cups, I use 9 grams of unground
beans. Works well every time!

Ken

Moto wrote:
> In article <slrnejl1i4.1ba0.steve@wizard.dyndns.org>, steve@SNIP-
> THIS.twoloonscoffee.com says...
>
>>In <hhrkj212o5jau7m70feqgfauo6cuusa5sf@4ax.com>, on Sat, 21 Oct 2006
>>12:36:25 -0700, Mr Moto wrote:
>>
>>>I am very frustrated in the fact that no matter what I do I can't make
>>>a good 16 oz cup of coffee. I go to a coffee shop and see them roast
>>>the beans, I buy a pound freshly roasted coffee, take it home, boil 24
>>>oz water in a pot, remove it from the heat , add 5 or 6 tablespoons of
>>>coffee, let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling, I
>>>pour it thru a #4 melitta filter into a 16 oz. cup. The cup that I
>>>make tastes no where near as good as the same cup that I get at the
>>>coffee shop.
>>>So, please tell me what I am doing wrong or tell me how to brew a 16
>>>oz cup of coffee that tastes as good as the coffee from the coffee
>>>shop.
>>
>>1) Grind. Are you using a quality burr grinder? If
>>so, are you grinding to roughly the same fineness the
>>shop is?
>
>
> No, I don't have a grinder. Don't know but my beans are ground for a
> melitta filter
>
>>2) Water. Does your water come from the same place
>>theirs does? If so, are they using any sort of water
>>treatment?
>
>
> No. I guess mostly all good coffee shops use a water filter. I have
> tried tap water, bottled water and filtered water at my house. I don't
> notice any difference in taste because my brewing methods are way off.
>
>
>>3) Brew temp. You say "just below boiling." Without
>>quantifying that, it's impossible to say whether it's
>>a factor or not. If "just below boiling" means 211°F,
>>it's too hot. Their equipment is likely set up to
>>brew in the 195°F - 205°F range.
>>
>
>
> OK I will brew in this range
>
>
>>4) Coffee to water ratio. While 24 oz. of water is
>>a pretty consistent mass, "5 or 6 tablespoons" is a
>>pretty broad target. Even if you said 5.5 TBSP, it
>>still varies with the density of the individual roast
>>and bean. A TBSP of light roast will be heavier than
>>a TBSP of dark roast.
>> When I worked at a coffee shop, we used .24 lbs. of
>>grounds for a half-gallon pot of coffee. Most likely
>>"your" coffee shop is weighing their coffee as well.
>>If you're not weighing your coffee, that's another step
>>where you're not duplicating their method. You want to
>>shoot for roughly a 17:1 water to coffee ratio by
>>weight.
>>
>
> Wow, that deep stuff.
>
>


 
Date: 21 Oct 2006 16:19:49
From: St. John Smythe
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
Mr Moto wrote:
> So, please tell me what I am doing wrong

This:
> let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling,


> or tell me how to brew a 16
> oz cup of coffee that tastes as good as the coffee from the coffee
> shop.

Try brewing three to four minutes *off* the fire, starting at 195-200.

How are you grinding, and how fine?

--
St. John
It's difficult to see the picture when you are inside the frame.


  
Date: 21 Oct 2006 17:37:13
From: Moto
Subject: Re: One cup brewing HOW?
In article <ehdvd5$apj$13@n4vu2.n4vu.com >, sinjen@n4vu.com says...
> Mr Moto wrote:
> > So, please tell me what I am doing wrong
>
> This:
> > let it brew 5 min. keeping the water just below boiling,
>
>
> > or tell me how to brew a 16
> > oz cup of coffee that tastes as good as the coffee from the coffee
> > shop.
>
> Try brewing three to four minutes *off* the fire, starting at 195-200.
>
> How are you grinding, and how fine?
>
>
Coffee shop ground the beans for a melitta filter