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Date: 13 Feb 2007 15:52:40
From: anthony
Subject: Pavoni temperatures?
A while back I had the chance to buy an updated-version Pavoni
Professional lever machine from a friend who never used it -- it was
her husband's machine, and after he died some 4 years back, it
remained on her bench unused. So I guess I bought a machine which was,
in effect, less than a year old.
I noticed, on a trial use at her home, that the machine, when switched
on, would cycle right through until the bar-pressure indicator dial
was right at the extreme end of the 'red-for-danger' band. You had to
catch the machine at the right moment, as it cycled up in pressure and
temperature, to pull a decent shot.
Now however, the machine cycles up to just below the start of the red
band, and stays there. It pulls beautifully sweet, aromatic shots and
never threatens to over-heat.
Is it normal for a machine not in use for some years to behave
erratically like this did initially? Any possible cause for the
initial problem and its subsequent correction?





 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 17:48:49
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
On Feb 14, 6:10 pm, "anthony" <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net > wrote:
> > Whomever wrote that should see lime defined. Very nasty here -
> > periodically takes strong acid and a toothbrush for cutting through
> > fixtures and porclain. Wouldn't be in a Pavoni with the manometer, had
> > I one. Be a large box of citric acid for regular cleaning, instead of
> > vinegar overnight, as it is, and a quick run of lime juice after for
> > freshening up. Attractive machines - simplicity within elegance. Bet
> > he picked it up for a song and dance - perfect shape, $300.
>
> I'll give it a clean with the citric acid -- have a stack on hand I
> was using for another
> machine -- and we have our own lime juice supply in the garden.....
> Pretty close on price .. I got it for $250 Australian, which equates
> to around $200 US.
> thanks for all the advice .. I hadn't realised how regularly it should
> be cleaned.

Yes, by all means. Lime juice / vinegar is for my own (not even near
a la Pavoni) - whereas citric acid is the "proper" prescription.
$200. Wow. You got some catch. Think I'll turn green. There will be
web sites, tips and tricks and also for keeping it in good order.
Still wondering why Mr. DaveB isn't particularly fond of taking a la
Pavoni down - an espresso mechanic's insight is interesting.



 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 15:10:06
From: anthony
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?

> Whomever wrote that should see lime defined. Very nasty here -
> periodically takes strong acid and a toothbrush for cutting through
> fixtures and porclain. Wouldn't be in a Pavoni with the manometer, had
> I one. Be a large box of citric acid for regular cleaning, instead of
> vinegar overnight, as it is, and a quick run of lime juice after for
> freshening up. Attractive machines - simplicity within elegance. Bet
> he picked it up for a song and dance - perfect shape, $300.


I'll give it a clean with the citric acid -- have a stack on hand I
was using for another
machine -- and we have our own lime juice supply in the garden.....
Pretty close on price .. I got it for $250 Australian, which equates
to around $200 US.
thanks for all the advice .. I hadn't realised how regularly it should
be cleaned.




  
Date: 15 Feb 2007 06:52:03
From: Donn Cave
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
Quoth "anthony" <anthonyjhcnospam@netscape.net >:
...


 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 09:11:32
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
On Feb 14, 10:41 am, "daveb" <davebobbl...@gmail.com > wrote:
>
> I'd clean out the tank and replace the old 'stat. (not that I'd work
> on a Pavoni)
>
> dave

New with adequate given cleaning and care. Recall seeing something of
grouphead weight issues - Europiccola and Stradivari not being
necessarily better. Clean the piston every 3 months, maybe as much as
7 yrs on gaskets @ low boiler use. What's the problem with working on
one?



 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 08:27:52
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
On Feb 14, 10:17 am, "Jack Denver" <nunuv...@netscape.net > wrote:
> No thermistors in a Pavoni, so that's out.
>
> There is a pressurestat - it's possible that either the pressurestat was a
> little sticky from non use or there was crud in the line leading to the
> p'stat which acted as a damper and slowed down its response.
>
> In any case, I'd look inside the boiler and see if there is any visible
> scale accumulation and if there was I'd descale the machine.

Looking at them on Amazon/Ebay. Chrome PC16.

"The machine is largely constructed of cast brass and is built to
last. The large boiler ensures that lime scale deposits have minimal
effect, meaning minimum maintenance is needed."

Whomever wrote that should see lime defined. Very nasty here -
periodically takes strong acid and a toothbrush for cutting through
fixtures and porclain. Wouldn't be in a Pavoni with the manometer, had
I one. Be a large box of citric acid for regular cleaning, instead of
vinegar overnight, as it is, and a quick run of lime juice after for
freshening up. Attractive machines - simplicity within elegance. Bet
he picked it up for a song and dance - perfect shape, $300.



 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 07:41:31
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
On Feb 13, 6:52 pm, "anthony" <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net > wrote:
> A while back I had the chance to buy an updated-version Pavoni
> Professional lever machine from a friend who never used it -- it was
> her husband's machine, and after he died some 4 years back, it
> remained on her bench unused. So I guess I bought a machine which was,
> in effect, less than a year old.
> I noticed, on a trial use at her home, that the machine, when switched
> on, would cycle right through until the bar-pressure indicator dial
> was right at the extreme end of the 'red-for-danger' band. You had to
> catch the machine at the right moment, as it cycled up in pressure and
> temperature, to pull a decent shot.
> Now however, the machine cycles up to just below the start of the red
> band, and stays there. It pulls beautifully sweet, aromatic shots and
> never threatens to over-heat.
> Is it normal for a machine not in use for some years to behave
> erratically like this did initially? Any possible cause for the
> initial problem and its subsequent correction?

Beign a pressurestat, they are inherently unreliable, and especailly
prone to mineral.

I'd clean out the tank and replace the old 'stat. (not that I'd work
on a Pavoni)

dave




 
Date: 14 Feb 2007 02:50:51
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
On Feb 13, 6:52 pm, "anthony" <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net > wrote:
> A while back I had the chance to buy an updated-version Pavoni
> Professional lever machine from a friend who never used it -- it was
> her husband's machine, and after he died some 4 years back, it
> remained on her bench unused. So I guess I bought a machine which was,
> in effect, less than a year old.
> I noticed, on a trial use at her home, that the machine, when switched
> on, would cycle right through until the bar-pressure indicator dial
> was right at the extreme end of the 'red-for-danger' band. You had to
> catch the machine at the right moment, as it cycled up in pressure and
> temperature, to pull a decent shot.
> Now however, the machine cycles up to just below the start of the red
> band, and stays there. It pulls beautifully sweet, aromatic shots and
> never threatens to over-heat.
> Is it normal for a machine not in use for some years to behave
> erratically like this did initially? Any possible cause for the
> initial problem and its subsequent correction?


Build up or deposits isolating a thermistor that where then saturated
or disolved. Pressurestat start working after running cleaner through
it, or its never been cleaned?



  
Date: 14 Feb 2007 10:17:44
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Pavoni temperatures?
No thermistors in a Pavoni, so that's out.

There is a pressurestat - it's possible that either the pressurestat was a
little sticky from non use or there was crud in the line leading to the
p'stat which acted as a damper and slowed down its response.

In any case, I'd look inside the boiler and see if there is any visible
scale accumulation and if there was I'd descale the machine.


"Flasherly" <gjerrell@ij.net > wrote in message
news:1171450251.396364.11880@h3g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...
> On Feb 13, 6:52 pm, "anthony" <anthonyjhcnos...@netscape.net> wrote:
>> A while back I had the chance to buy an updated-version Pavoni
>> Professional lever machine from a friend who never used it -- it was
>> her husband's machine, and after he died some 4 years back, it
>> remained on her bench unused. So I guess I bought a machine which was,
>> in effect, less than a year old.
>> I noticed, on a trial use at her home, that the machine, when switched
>> on, would cycle right through until the bar-pressure indicator dial
>> was right at the extreme end of the 'red-for-danger' band. You had to
>> catch the machine at the right moment, as it cycled up in pressure and
>> temperature, to pull a decent shot.
>> Now however, the machine cycles up to just below the start of the red
>> band, and stays there. It pulls beautifully sweet, aromatic shots and
>> never threatens to over-heat.
>> Is it normal for a machine not in use for some years to behave
>> erratically like this did initially? Any possible cause for the
>> initial problem and its subsequent correction?
>
>
> Build up or deposits isolating a thermistor that where then saturated
> or disolved. Pressurestat start working after running cleaner through
> it, or its never been cleaned?
>