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Date: 22 Jan 2007 10:29:44
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Poppery 2 temp
I can only obtain about 370 deg F .with both heaters running and fan
operating at max speed with no beans in the chamber . I already bypassed
the thermostat and the thermal cut out. .Is this correct or its too low .
Tks






 
Date: 23 Jan 2007 14:26:49
From:
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
In alt.coffee, Sportflyer <mode1flyerNOSPAM@netzero.net > wrote:
> I can only obtain about 370 deg F .with both heaters running and fan
> operating at max speed with no beans in the chamber . I already bypassed
> the thermostat and the thermal cut out. .Is this correct or its too low .

It is irrelevant, but interesting nonetheless. It shows the minimum temp
the roaster is capable of.


--
The whole problem with the world is that fools and fanatics are always so
certain of themselves, but wiser people so full of doubts.
-- Bertrand Russel



 
Date: 22 Jan 2007 18:31:46
From: stereoplegic
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
i don't know about using it full-time, but if you have the fan and
heater circuit split-wired, you shouldn't need the 2nd heating coil;
however, wiring it separately from the first heater and giving it its
own switch can help to give your roasts a little extra boost when
needed (such as initial ramp). on its own, it'll probably only heat to
about 125-150 degrees fahrenheit. google "jeff mielke coffee roast" or
something like that. his is the main split-wiring/control box idea i
borrowed from, except that i used color-coded extension cords
(black-heat, white-fan) instead of 6-pin DIN cables and jacks (he
mentions himself that they DIN option could create an electrical
current bottleneck/hazard.

Sportflyer wrote:
> The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to run the
> motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I wont
> roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use if
> necessary to control power. tks
>
>
>
> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
> news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
> > Sportflyer wrote:
> >
> >> Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around before
> >> I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
> >
> > I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results, using
> > a Toastmaster.
> >
> >
> >>
> >> I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V transformerand
> >> dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the smaller
> >> heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage to
> >> the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor .
> >> Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
> >
> > Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
> > only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is internal
> > to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery II.
> >
> > Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so, the
> > series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
> > significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of beans.
> > I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run hotter
> > than before.
> >
> > Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
> > DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
> > electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
> > differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
> > roast unattended.
> >
> >
> >
> >>
> >>
> >> "notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
> >> news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
> >>
> >>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>>
> >>>
> >>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
> >>>>Give that a try...
> >>>
> >>>Yep.
> >>>
> >>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
> >>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
> >>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
> >>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
> >>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
> >>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
> >>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
> >>>weather.
> >>>
> >>>nb
> >>
> >>



  
Date: 22 Jan 2007 21:27:23
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
On second thought , why not just keep the second coil and motor in series
and drive both thru the dimmer controller . No transforner is needed and
wiring is much easier.


"stereoplegic" <stereoplegic@aim.com > wrote in message
news:1169519506.855892.144490@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>i don't know about using it full-time, but if you have the fan and
> heater circuit split-wired, you shouldn't need the 2nd heating coil;
> however, wiring it separately from the first heater and giving it its
> own switch can help to give your roasts a little extra boost when
> needed (such as initial ramp). on its own, it'll probably only heat to
> about 125-150 degrees fahrenheit. google "jeff mielke coffee roast" or
> something like that. his is the main split-wiring/control box idea i
> borrowed from, except that i used color-coded extension cords
> (black-heat, white-fan) instead of 6-pin DIN cables and jacks (he
> mentions himself that they DIN option could create an electrical
> current bottleneck/hazard.
>
> Sportflyer wrote:
>> The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to run
>> the
>> motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I wont
>> roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use if
>> necessary to control power. tks
>>
>>
>>
>> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>> news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
>> > Sportflyer wrote:
>> >
>> >> Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around
>> >> before
>> >> I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
>> >
>> > I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results,
>> > using
>> > a Toastmaster.
>> >
>> >
>> >>
>> >> I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V
>> >> transformerand
>> >> dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the
>> >> smaller
>> >> heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage
>> >> to
>> >> the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor .
>> >> Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
>> >
>> > Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
>> > only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is
>> > internal
>> > to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery
>> > II.
>> >
>> > Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so,
>> > the
>> > series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
>> > significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of
>> > beans.
>> > I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run
>> > hotter
>> > than before.
>> >
>> > Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
>> > DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
>> > electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
>> > differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
>> > roast unattended.
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >>
>> >>
>> >> "notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
>> >> news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>> >>
>> >>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>> >>>
>> >>>
>> >>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>> >>>>Give that a try...
>> >>>
>> >>>Yep.
>> >>>
>> >>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
>> >>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
>> >>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
>> >>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>> >>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
>> >>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
>> >>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>> >>>weather.
>> >>>
>> >>>nb
>> >>
>> >>
>




   
Date: 23 Jan 2007 10:03:51
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Sportflyer wrote:

> On second thought , why not just keep the second coil and motor in series
> and drive both thru the dimmer controller . No transforner is needed and
> wiring is much easier.

I've seen a dimmer system, but I've never seen a need. I have mine
rewired so that it's always on when plugged in, and the switch takes the
main heat coil in and out of the circuit. If it's running too hot
(crack is too rapid or oils start to smoke) all I need to do is bump the
main heater off for 2 to 5 seconds at a time. That's all it takes to
cool it down. Plus, my method of roasting at a slight angle also
compensates for heat. The more of an angle, the more air flow and the
lower the temperature.

There are easy ways and more complicated ways to accomplish the same
thing. The switch is a great help. I might love a variac or dimmer
system, but I'm at the point where I don't see a need for it.



>
>
> "stereoplegic" <stereoplegic@aim.com> wrote in message
> news:1169519506.855892.144490@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
>>i don't know about using it full-time, but if you have the fan and
>>heater circuit split-wired, you shouldn't need the 2nd heating coil;
>>however, wiring it separately from the first heater and giving it its
>>own switch can help to give your roasts a little extra boost when
>>needed (such as initial ramp). on its own, it'll probably only heat to
>>about 125-150 degrees fahrenheit. google "jeff mielke coffee roast" or
>>something like that. his is the main split-wiring/control box idea i
>>borrowed from, except that i used color-coded extension cords
>>(black-heat, white-fan) instead of 6-pin DIN cables and jacks (he
>>mentions himself that they DIN option could create an electrical
>>current bottleneck/hazard.
>>
>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>
>>>The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to run
>>>the
>>>motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I wont
>>>roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use if
>>>necessary to control power. tks
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>>>news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
>>>
>>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around
>>>>>before
>>>>>I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
>>>>
>>>>I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results,
>>>>using
>>>>a Toastmaster.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V
>>>>>transformerand
>>>>>dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the
>>>>>smaller
>>>>>heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage
>>>>>to
>>>>>the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor .
>>>>>Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
>>>>
>>>>Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
>>>>only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is
>>>>internal
>>>>to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery
>>>>II.
>>>>
>>>>Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so,
>>>>the
>>>>series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
>>>>significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of
>>>>beans.
>>>>I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run
>>>>hotter
>>>>than before.
>>>>
>>>>Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
>>>>DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
>>>>electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
>>>>differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
>>>>roast unattended.
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>"notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
>>>>>news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>>>>>>>Give that a try...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Yep.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
>>>>>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
>>>>>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
>>>>>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>>>>>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
>>>>>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
>>>>>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>>>>>>weather.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>nb
>>>>>
>>>>>
>
>


    
Date: 23 Jan 2007 14:48:20
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Since I already have a dimmer and spare switches, I might just as well add
them.

I need to devise a simple way to recycle the heat but not the chaff so that
roasting can be done in the winter months in the NW. I saw some photos of
placing the Popper in a corrugated carton and using the box flap to divert
the exhausted heat back to the intakes but I dislike placing such a hot item
with potential fire hazard in a cardbord box .

"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com > wrote in message
news:12rcjfsp8qhdd08@corp.supernews.com...
> Sportflyer wrote:
>
>> On second thought , why not just keep the second coil and motor in series
>> and drive both thru the dimmer controller . No transforner is needed and
>> wiring is much easier.
>
> I've seen a dimmer system, but I've never seen a need. I have mine
> rewired so that it's always on when plugged in, and the switch takes the
> main heat coil in and out of the circuit. If it's running too hot (crack
> is too rapid or oils start to smoke) all I need to do is bump the main
> heater off for 2 to 5 seconds at a time. That's all it takes to cool it
> down. Plus, my method of roasting at a slight angle also compensates for
> heat. The more of an angle, the more air flow and the lower the
> temperature.
>
> There are easy ways and more complicated ways to accomplish the same
> thing. The switch is a great help. I might love a variac or dimmer
> system, but I'm at the point where I don't see a need for it.
>
>
>
>>
>>
>> "stereoplegic" <stereoplegic@aim.com> wrote in message
>> news:1169519506.855892.144490@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>
>>>i don't know about using it full-time, but if you have the fan and
>>>heater circuit split-wired, you shouldn't need the 2nd heating coil;
>>>however, wiring it separately from the first heater and giving it its
>>>own switch can help to give your roasts a little extra boost when
>>>needed (such as initial ramp). on its own, it'll probably only heat to
>>>about 125-150 degrees fahrenheit. google "jeff mielke coffee roast" or
>>>something like that. his is the main split-wiring/control box idea i
>>>borrowed from, except that i used color-coded extension cords
>>>(black-heat, white-fan) instead of 6-pin DIN cables and jacks (he
>>>mentions himself that they DIN option could create an electrical
>>>current bottleneck/hazard.
>>>
>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>
>>>>The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to run
>>>>the
>>>>motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I wont
>>>>roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use if
>>>>necessary to control power. tks
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
>>>>
>>>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around
>>>>>>before
>>>>>>I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
>>>>>
>>>>>I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results,
>>>>>using
>>>>>a Toastmaster.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V
>>>>>>transformerand
>>>>>>dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the
>>>>>>smaller
>>>>>>heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage
>>>>>>to
>>>>>>the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor .
>>>>>>Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
>>>>>
>>>>>Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
>>>>>only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is
>>>>>internal
>>>>>to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery
>>>>>II.
>>>>>
>>>>>Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so,
>>>>>the
>>>>>series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
>>>>>significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of
>>>>>beans.
>>>>>I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run
>>>>>hotter
>>>>>than before.
>>>>>
>>>>>Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
>>>>>DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
>>>>>electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
>>>>>differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
>>>>>roast unattended.
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>"notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>>>>>>>>Give that a try...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Yep.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
>>>>>>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
>>>>>>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
>>>>>>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>>>>>>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
>>>>>>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
>>>>>>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>>>>>>>weather.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>nb
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>



     
Date: 23 Jan 2007 17:29:55
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Sportflyer wrote:

> Since I already have a dimmer and spare switches, I might just as well add
> them.
>
> I need to devise a simple way to recycle the heat but not the chaff so that
> roasting can be done in the winter months in the NW. I saw some photos of
> placing the Popper in a corrugated carton and using the box flap to divert
> the exhausted heat back to the intakes but I dislike placing such a hot item
> with potential fire hazard in a cardbord box .

Like I said, I'm in Seattle and it's not an issue for me. In fact, I'll
be roasting a batch of Sweet ia's Zambian Lupili tonight on an
unheated porch. http://www.sweetias.com/coffee.africa.zambia.html
Good stuff for espresso, as is their Monkey Blend. If ambient
temperature is low, you can compensate by adding a few more beans (as
long as you stir at first, until they move on their own). Since I roast
a larger load at an angle with a can forced in the opening, all I need
to do is decrease the angle a bit and the beans get hotter due to less
air flow.

Works for me.


>
> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
> news:12rcjfsp8qhdd08@corp.supernews.com...
>
>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>
>>
>>>On second thought , why not just keep the second coil and motor in series
>>>and drive both thru the dimmer controller . No transforner is needed and
>>>wiring is much easier.
>>
>>I've seen a dimmer system, but I've never seen a need. I have mine
>>rewired so that it's always on when plugged in, and the switch takes the
>>main heat coil in and out of the circuit. If it's running too hot (crack
>>is too rapid or oils start to smoke) all I need to do is bump the main
>>heater off for 2 to 5 seconds at a time. That's all it takes to cool it
>>down. Plus, my method of roasting at a slight angle also compensates for
>>heat. The more of an angle, the more air flow and the lower the
>>temperature.
>>
>>There are easy ways and more complicated ways to accomplish the same
>>thing. The switch is a great help. I might love a variac or dimmer
>>system, but I'm at the point where I don't see a need for it.
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>>
>>>"stereoplegic" <stereoplegic@aim.com> wrote in message
>>>news:1169519506.855892.144490@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>>
>>>
>>>>i don't know about using it full-time, but if you have the fan and
>>>>heater circuit split-wired, you shouldn't need the 2nd heating coil;
>>>>however, wiring it separately from the first heater and giving it its
>>>>own switch can help to give your roasts a little extra boost when
>>>>needed (such as initial ramp). on its own, it'll probably only heat to
>>>>about 125-150 degrees fahrenheit. google "jeff mielke coffee roast" or
>>>>something like that. his is the main split-wiring/control box idea i
>>>>borrowed from, except that i used color-coded extension cords
>>>>(black-heat, white-fan) instead of 6-pin DIN cables and jacks (he
>>>>mentions himself that they DIN option could create an electrical
>>>>current bottleneck/hazard.
>>>>
>>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to run
>>>>>the
>>>>>motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I wont
>>>>>roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use if
>>>>>necessary to control power. tks
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>>>>>news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around
>>>>>>>before
>>>>>>>I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
>>>>>>
>>>>>>I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results,
>>>>>>using
>>>>>>a Toastmaster.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V
>>>>>>>transformerand
>>>>>>>dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the
>>>>>>>smaller
>>>>>>>heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage
>>>>>>>to
>>>>>>>the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor .
>>>>>>>Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
>>>>>>only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is
>>>>>>internal
>>>>>>to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery
>>>>>>II.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so,
>>>>>>the
>>>>>>series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
>>>>>>significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of
>>>>>>beans.
>>>>>>I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run
>>>>>>hotter
>>>>>>than before.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
>>>>>>DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
>>>>>>electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
>>>>>>differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
>>>>>>roast unattended.
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>"notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>>>>>>>>>Give that a try...
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Yep.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
>>>>>>>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
>>>>>>>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
>>>>>>>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>>>>>>>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
>>>>>>>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
>>>>>>>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>>>>>>>>weather.
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>nb
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>


      
Date: 24 Jan 2007 05:36:13
From: Donn Cave
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Quoth Jim <askme@beforeyousend.com >:



       
Date: 24 Jan 2007 13:35:36
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Donn Cave wrote:

> Quoth Jim <askme@beforeyousend.com>:
>
>


      
Date: 23 Jan 2007 20:55:54
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
I need to get some junk beans from Sweet ias for test runs as I am new
to roasting . Then I will try their Monkey blend for espressos. Tks


"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com > wrote in message
news:12rddkkdhlni24@corp.supernews.com...
> Sportflyer wrote:
>
>> Since I already have a dimmer and spare switches, I might just as well
>> add them.
>>
>> I need to devise a simple way to recycle the heat but not the chaff so
>> that roasting can be done in the winter months in the NW. I saw some
>> photos of placing the Popper in a corrugated carton and using the box
>> flap to divert the exhausted heat back to the intakes but I dislike
>> placing such a hot item with potential fire hazard in a cardbord box .
>
> Like I said, I'm in Seattle and it's not an issue for me. In fact, I'll
> be roasting a batch of Sweet ia's Zambian Lupili tonight on an unheated
> porch. http://www.sweetias.com/coffee.africa.zambia.html Good stuff
> for espresso, as is their Monkey Blend. If ambient temperature is low,
> you can compensate by adding a few more beans (as long as you stir at
> first, until they move on their own). Since I roast a larger load at an
> angle with a can forced in the opening, all I need to do is decrease the
> angle a bit and the beans get hotter due to less air flow.
>
> Works for me.
>
>
>>
>> "Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>> news:12rcjfsp8qhdd08@corp.supernews.com...
>>
>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>On second thought , why not just keep the second coil and motor in
>>>>series and drive both thru the dimmer controller . No transforner is
>>>>needed and wiring is much easier.
>>>
>>>I've seen a dimmer system, but I've never seen a need. I have mine
>>>rewired so that it's always on when plugged in, and the switch takes the
>>>main heat coil in and out of the circuit. If it's running too hot (crack
>>>is too rapid or oils start to smoke) all I need to do is bump the main
>>>heater off for 2 to 5 seconds at a time. That's all it takes to cool it
>>>down. Plus, my method of roasting at a slight angle also compensates for
>>>heat. The more of an angle, the more air flow and the lower the
>>>temperature.
>>>
>>>There are easy ways and more complicated ways to accomplish the same
>>>thing. The switch is a great help. I might love a variac or dimmer
>>>system, but I'm at the point where I don't see a need for it.
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>>>
>>>>"stereoplegic" <stereoplegic@aim.com> wrote in message
>>>>news:1169519506.855892.144490@q2g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>>>>
>>>>
>>>>>i don't know about using it full-time, but if you have the fan and
>>>>>heater circuit split-wired, you shouldn't need the 2nd heating coil;
>>>>>however, wiring it separately from the first heater and giving it its
>>>>>own switch can help to give your roasts a little extra boost when
>>>>>needed (such as initial ramp). on its own, it'll probably only heat to
>>>>>about 125-150 degrees fahrenheit. google "jeff mielke coffee roast" or
>>>>>something like that. his is the main split-wiring/control box idea i
>>>>>borrowed from, except that i used color-coded extension cords
>>>>>(black-heat, white-fan) instead of 6-pin DIN cables and jacks (he
>>>>>mentions himself that they DIN option could create an electrical
>>>>>current bottleneck/hazard.
>>>>>
>>>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>>>
>>>>>
>>>>>>The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to
>>>>>>run the
>>>>>>motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I
>>>>>>wont
>>>>>>roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use
>>>>>>if
>>>>>>necessary to control power. tks
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
>>>>>>
>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Sportflyer wrote:
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around
>>>>>>>>before
>>>>>>>>I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results,
>>>>>>>using
>>>>>>>a Toastmaster.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V
>>>>>>>>transformerand
>>>>>>>>dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the
>>>>>>>>smaller
>>>>>>>>heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more
>>>>>>>>voltage to
>>>>>>>>the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor
>>>>>>>>.
>>>>>>>>Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements?
>>>>>>>There's
>>>>>>>only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is
>>>>>>>internal
>>>>>>>to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the
>>>>>>>Poppery II.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so,
>>>>>>>the
>>>>>>>series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
>>>>>>>significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of
>>>>>>>beans.
>>>>>>>I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run
>>>>>>>hotter
>>>>>>>than before.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
>>>>>>>DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
>>>>>>>electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
>>>>>>>differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so
>>>>>>>don't
>>>>>>>roast unattended.
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>"notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
>>>>>>>>news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go
>>>>>>>>>>up.
>>>>>>>>>>Give that a try...
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>Yep.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing
>>>>>>>>>the
>>>>>>>>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add
>>>>>>>>>a
>>>>>>>>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce
>>>>>>>>>the
>>>>>>>>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>>>>>>>>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C.
>>>>>>>>>The
>>>>>>>>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a
>>>>>>>>>temp
>>>>>>>>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>>>>>>>>>weather.
>>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>>nb
>>>>>>>>
>>>>>>>>
>>




 
Date: 22 Jan 2007 10:49:12
From:
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp

Sportflyer wrote:
> I can only obtain about 370 deg F .with both heaters running and fan
> operating at max speed with no beans in the chamber . I already bypassed
> the thermostat and the thermal cut out. .Is this correct or its too low .
> Tks

If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
Give that a try...

Matt



  
Date: 22 Jan 2007 13:29:13
From: notbob
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com > wrote:

> If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
> Give that a try...

Yep.

In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
weather.

nb


   
Date: 22 Jan 2007 14:38:13
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around before I
try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA

I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V transformerand
dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the smaller
heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage to the
smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor . Would this
blow up the coil ? Tks


"notbob" <notbob@nothome.com > wrote in message
news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
> On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>> Give that a try...
>
> Yep.
>
> In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
> beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
> little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
> amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
> ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
> biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
> of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
> weather.
>
> nb




    
Date: 22 Jan 2007 15:30:40
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
Sportflyer wrote:

> Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around before I
> try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA

I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results,
using a Toastmaster.


>
> I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V transformerand
> dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the smaller
> heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage to the
> smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor . Would this
> blow up the coil ? Tks

Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is internal
to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery II.

Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so,
the series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage
might significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of
beans. I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and
run hotter than before.

Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
roast unattended.



>
>
> "notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
> news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>
>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>>>Give that a try...
>>
>>Yep.
>>
>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>>weather.
>>
>>nb
>
>
>


     
Date: 22 Jan 2007 16:41:34
From: Sportflyer
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
The inner heater is in series with the motor to drop the voltage to run the
motor. I understand the heater requirements that's why I asked . I wont
roast unattended. Too dangerous. I also have a variac that I can use if
necessary to control power. tks



"Jim" <askme@beforeyousend.com > wrote in message
news:12rai8m4evcp4ae@corp.supernews.com...
> Sportflyer wrote:
>
>> Well, it looks like I will have to wait for summer to come around before
>> I try it. Its 45 degrees here in WA
>
> I'm in Seattle and I roast at those temperatures with good results, using
> a Toastmaster.
>
>
>>
>> I will rewire to separate out the motor drive thru a 24V transformerand
>> dimmer controller . When doing this , I will be connecting the smaller
>> heating coil directly across the mains. This would mean more voltage to
>> the smaller coil since it is now no longer in series with the motor .
>> Would this blow up the coil ? Tks
>
> Does it actually have two separate ni-chrome heating elements? There's
> only one element that I can see in my Toastmaster, the other is internal
> to the motor. I thought this was the Chinese knock off of the Poppery II.
>
> Do you know for a fact that the motor is supposed to see 24V? If so, the
> series coil was designed to see under 100V. A 20% over voltage might
> significantly shorten the life, especially if loaded with a lot of beans.
> I'd expect it to increase the wattage drawn from the wall and run hotter
> than before.
>
> Here's an old thread on the Toastmaster: http://tinyurl.com/2gttjh
> DISCLAIMER: Don't rewire if you don't understand the basics of
> electricity and the fact that you are altering the unit to work
> differently than as manufactured. There's always a fire risk, so don't
> roast unattended.
>
>
>
>>
>>
>> "notbob" <notbob@nothome.com> wrote in message
>> news:BKKdnT0gJ9kUjSjYnZ2dnUVZ_radnZ2d@comcast.com...
>>
>>>On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>>>
>>>
>>>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>>>>Give that a try...
>>>
>>>Yep.
>>>
>>>In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
>>>beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
>>>little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
>>>amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
>>>ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
>>>biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
>>>of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
>>>weather.
>>>
>>>nb
>>
>>



   
Date: 22 Jan 2007 12:40:23
From: Jim
Subject: Re: Poppery 2 temp
notbob wrote:

> On 2007-01-22, mattjnk@gmail.com <mattjnk@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>
>>If you add beans the air-flow will go down and the heat will go up.
>>Give that a try...
>
>
> Yep.
>
> In fact, you can do a little roast tweaking by adding or reducing the
> beans. The Poppery II takes exactly 1/2 cup (level) of beans. Add a
> little extra and the roast will be hotter and go quicker. Reduce the
> amount and the roast will take longer. We're talking just 1/2 an
> ounce or so, one way or the other. Nothing drastic like 3/4 C. The
> biggest variable is ambient temperature. You need to roast in a temp
> of about 70 deg F or higher. You'll never roast outdoors in Winter
> weather.
>
> nb

I've seen this posted before, but I have no problem with my cheap
Chinese toastmaster on a cold porch. There's some additional time, but
I still end up bumping the main coil on and off if the crack gets too
rapid. It comes with an on/off switch that I rewired to fan or fan plus
heating coil. Note that there is still some heat with the fan.

I also roast at a slight angle so that beans cycle from top to bottom.
The chaff also blows out easier, and away from the popper. It may be a
bit tougher on the motor, but it works for me. They seem to last from 3
to 9 months with weekly use, but I never pay more than $5. Still, the
rewire job is a HASSLE, and I'd like to find the more rugged older
version, "one of these days." But ebay's standard $50 range doesn't
seem right. I keep hoping I'll see one at the usual second hand stores.