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Date: 26 Mar 2007 22:39:54
From:
Subject: Question to other I-Roast2 users
I've been using my I-Roast 2 for several months, and I still can't get
a profile that I like. I'm currently working through a 5 pound bag of
Costa Rica beans from Sweet ias, and I've been experimenting with a
variety of times and temperatures. No matter what roast level I stop
at, I keep getting beans that taste like charcoal. I've stopped at a
city roast, and still the same results. The beans smell great, but
the taste is always disappointing. I'd just like to discuss things
with other I-Roast 2 users and see if we can trade experiences.

Curtis,
Austin, TX




 
Date: 29 Mar 2007 02:53:29
From: JulesG
Subject: Re: Question to other I-Roast2 users
Trevor, very well said ! However your profile is much too hot for my
set-up since I roast inside with a temp of 70-72 F. Your profile puts
the iR2 in low speed mode after 3 minutes and this means very short
roasts but this may be OK since you roast outside.



  
Date: 29 Mar 2007 11:16:54
From: Trevor Morris
Subject: Re: Question to other I-Roast2 users
Correct Jules - right now in SoCal the ambient temps mid-morning are about
55 - 65, so I've found it's only in the 2nd to 3rd stage when it will go
into low speed mode. In the summer time, I'll reach first crack a lot
quicker (maybe 6 - 7 minutes), but since I am visually monitoring the roast
at all times, I know when to stop it sooner.

"JulesG" <jules.gobeil@videotron.ca > wrote in message
news:1175162009.104279.133960@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
> Trevor, very well said ! However your profile is much too hot for my
> set-up since I roast inside with a temp of 70-72 F. Your profile puts
> the iR2 in low speed mode after 3 minutes and this means very short
> roasts but this may be OK since you roast outside.
>




 
Date: 28 Mar 2007 20:34:33
From: Trevor Morris
Subject: Re: Question to other I-Roast2 users
Curtis:

I've been roasting with the IR2 for about a year and have yet to find a
roast that I did not like. The trick, as JulesG mentioned, is to roast by
sight and sound. Profiles work great if you have the exact same reproducible
ambient conditions each and every time, chief of which is outside
temperature. Others are stability of your household current and the type of
green bean you use - if you have created a profile to get your optimum roast
level for one bean variety, you will get dramatically different results for
another. Because I roast outside and roast several varieties, I abandoned
profiles long ago due to their unreliability. Here's what I've done instead,
and I've yet to find a bean that will not give me the roast level I've
desired.

1. Set up the following 4-stage profile for 15 minutes (the max that the IR2
will allow)

STAGE 1: 355 degrees F for 3:00 minutes

STAGE 2: 400 degrees F for 3:00 minutes

STAGE 3: 440 degrees F for 3:00 minutes

STAGE 4: 460 degrees F for 6:00 minutes

2. Use a scale to measure 150gm green beans at a time.

3. Start the roast and WATCH AND LISTEN ATTENTIVELY. First crack typically
occurs between 8:00 and 8:30 minutes into the roast.

4. If you want to monitor temperatures, remember that the display typically
underreads by 40 to 50 degrees.

5. You will clearly see when your desired roast level comes up. Stop the
roast manually at whatever point you wish after first crack (even though the
IR2 roars, you should be able to hear this anyway)

6. Since I buy my beans from SM, I go by Tom's recommendations all the
time - he knows what he's talking about! I typically like a FC to FC+
roast - for this level I'll stop the roast when I first start seeing about 5
or 6 beans exhibit oil residue. This level will just stop short of a
Viennese roast once the cooling stage is done.

Pros of this method: Way more personal involvement; wide range of roasts
available; works for all bean varieties; you can truly call yourself a
roaster; ambient conditions accounted for; great tasting coffee

Cons: Need to pay attention; Can't walk away from the roast the first time

Try it and let me know!

Good luck!

TM



<choffman@austin.rr.com > wrote in message
news:394h039dkem8mejt4d70s2iejg6od65vp2@4ax.com...
> I've been using my I-Roast 2 for several months, and I still can't get
> a profile that I like. I'm currently working through a 5 pound bag of
> Costa Rica beans from Sweet ias, and I've been experimenting with a
> variety of times and temperatures. No matter what roast level I stop
> at, I keep getting beans that taste like charcoal. I've stopped at a
> city roast, and still the same results. The beans smell great, but
> the taste is always disappointing. I'd just like to discuss things
> with other I-Roast 2 users and see if we can trade experiences.
>
> Curtis,
> Austin, TX




 
Date: 27 Mar 2007 16:28:36
From: JulesG
Subject: Re: Question to other I-Roast2 users
Roasting with the iR2 is quite simple. FInd a proven profile used
with success by others and ROAST BY SIGHT, stopping the roast when the
beans reach the color you are looking for.

This thread will tell you more:
http://www.coffeegeek.com/forums/coffee/homeroast/280956



 
Date: 27 Mar 2007 04:54:13
From: LF
Subject: Re: Question to other I-Roast2 users
On 26, 11:39 pm, choff...@austin.rr.com wrote:
> I've been using my I-Roast 2 for several months, <snip>
No matter what roast level I stop
> at, I keep getting beans that taste like charcoal. <snip>

I-Roast (iR) is WYSIWYG, not. The archives smolder with tales of iR
charcoal beans. Actual bean temperature is far from what you set via
the profile, and far from what the readout reports (seen by pressing
the *Temp* button while roasting). You, my friend, are roasting
blind.

I found (original iR) it most helpful to insert a thermometer probe
into the bean mass. An analog candy thermometer will do, if you are
willing to drill a hole thru the top and the chaff collector. A
digital thermometer will give a quicker read, and you might be able to
snake the probe into the bean mass. I chose the reckless abandon
method. Ah, another chance to void a warranty with my dremmel.

Hot air fluid bed roasters are fast! You hopefully will get better
results with lower temperatures and longer times. With a thermometer
probe in the beans, you can get a better idea of what's going on.
Record temperatures at regular intervals, like each minute, take notes
on your results, and your roasts will improve.

My roasts really improved when I constructed a SC/CO, and gave up the
iR.

All the best,
Larry