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Date: 14 Dec 2006 08:28:23
From: mattw
Subject: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
Got an old Rancilio MD-50 Grinder (for free) that I plan on cleaning up
and passing on to someone. I have cleaned and reworked another
commercial grinder (a Rossi RR45) and thought it was bad, but I had no
idea. The Rancilio still had ground and whole coffee in the doser and
throat (the person who gave it to me said it had not been used in 6
years, who knows if that is accurate, though) and is really gummed up.
I mean really.

Step one is to clean the burr assembly. It is also problem one. I
can't even get the upper burr assembly (the one you are supposed to be
able to adjust) to turn at all. Not even a little movement. My
assumption is that coffee oils have gummed the threads, but I can't
pour water into the machine to loosen it up, anyone got any ideas? It
looks like it will be a decent machine once I clean it up (it is
stepped, but has very small adjustments), but if I can't get the upper
burr assembly off, it will never get clean.

Thanks,
/mw





 
Date: 19 Dec 2006 15:01:41
From: mattw
Subject: Re: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
This is actually turning out to be a great grinder (especially
considering the $0 cost). It is stepped, but has very small steps,
almost to the point of being stepless (it appears, I still have not
pulled any espresso out of it). Replacing a couple of parts, doing a
tape mod to the doser, and the electronic adjustments I had to make (so
that the grinder ground when the switch was flipped instead of when the
doser is thwacked 6 times) and I think this will make someone a nice
grinder (I my keep it for decaf or as dedicated coffee).

Thanks for the hair-dryer suggestion.

/mw



 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 20:35:09
From: The Other Funk
Subject: Re: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
Finding the keyboard operational
mattw entered:

> Got an old Rancilio MD-50 Grinder (for free) that I plan on cleaning
> up and passing on to someone. I have cleaned and reworked another
> commercial grinder (a Rossi RR45) and thought it was bad, but I had no
> idea. The Rancilio still had ground and whole coffee in the doser and
> throat (the person who gave it to me said it had not been used in 6
> years, who knows if that is accurate, though) and is really gummed up.
> I mean really.
>
> Step one is to clean the burr assembly. It is also problem one. I
> can't even get the upper burr assembly (the one you are supposed to be
> able to adjust) to turn at all. Not even a little movement. My
> assumption is that coffee oils have gummed the threads, but I can't
> pour water into the machine to loosen it up, anyone got any ideas? It
> looks like it will be a decent machine once I clean it up (it is
> stepped, but has very small adjustments), but if I can't get the upper
> burr assembly off, it will never get clean.
>
> Thanks,
> /mw

I have used a non-stick cooking spray, aka PAM, to loosen things but make
sure you clean it all off. If you leave it on it will make things even
stickier.
I've been using hot water and a nylon brush for clean up. Wear gloves or
you'll have stains on you hands for a while.
Bob
--
--
Coffee worth staying up for - NY Times
www.moondoggiecoffee.com



 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 10:26:14
From: mattw
Subject: Re: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
Hair Dryer worked...thanks for the tip!

bernie wrote:
>
> Ask Barry. He'll tell you to get a torch. If not an actual torch,
> some way of applying heat to the assembly (hair dryer?) to loosen up the
> oils to the point they will turn loose. The prudent way would be to use
> your heat gun or hair dryer. I'd get the torch.
> Bernie (it's okay, m'aam, I'm a fireman) D.



 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 10:23:27
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
use a good penetrating oil in a spray can.-- preferably not WD 40

soak it with the oil and let set overnight.

DAve
189



 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 10:48:10
From: bernie
Subject: Re: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
mattw wrote:
> Got an old Rancilio MD-50 Grinder (for free) that I plan on cleaning up
> and passing on to someone. I have cleaned and reworked another
> commercial grinder (a Rossi RR45) and thought it was bad, but I had no
> idea. The Rancilio still had ground and whole coffee in the doser and
> throat (the person who gave it to me said it had not been used in 6
> years, who knows if that is accurate, though) and is really gummed up.
> I mean really.
>
> Step one is to clean the burr assembly. It is also problem one. I
> can't even get the upper burr assembly (the one you are supposed to be
> able to adjust) to turn at all. Not even a little movement. My
> assumption is that coffee oils have gummed the threads, but I can't
> pour water into the machine to loosen it up, anyone got any ideas? It
> looks like it will be a decent machine once I clean it up (it is
> stepped, but has very small adjustments), but if I can't get the upper
> burr assembly off, it will never get clean.
>
> Thanks,
> /mw
>

Ask Barry. He'll tell you to get a torch. If not an actual torch,
some way of applying heat to the assembly (hair dryer?) to loosen up the
oils to the point they will turn loose. The prudent way would be to use
your heat gun or hair dryer. I'd get the torch.
Bernie (it's okay, m'aam, I'm a fireman) D.


 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 15:50:29
From: daveblows
Subject: Re: Resurrecting a Commercial Grinder
"mattw" <matthewgwells@gmail.com > wrote in news:1166113703.716307.190140
@f1g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

> Got an old Rancilio MD-50 Grinder (for free) that I plan on cleaning up
> and passing on to someone. I have cleaned and reworked another
> commercial grinder (a Rossi RR45) and thought it was bad, but I had no
> idea. The Rancilio still had ground and whole coffee in the doser and
> throat (the person who gave it to me said it had not been used in 6
> years, who knows if that is accurate, though) and is really gummed up.
> I mean really.
>
> Step one is to clean the burr assembly. It is also problem one. I
> can't even get the upper burr assembly (the one you are supposed to be
> able to adjust) to turn at all. Not even a little movement. My
> assumption is that coffee oils have gummed the threads, but I can't
> pour water into the machine to loosen it up, anyone got any ideas? It
> looks like it will be a decent machine once I clean it up (it is
> stepped, but has very small adjustments), but if I can't get the upper
> burr assembly off, it will never get clean.
>
> Thanks,
> /mw
>
>

I would give it a good, long soak in very soapy, very hot water. Or you
could try a pressure wash. Water is OK as long as you dry it out completely
before using it.

Robert (Give it good hose job.) Harmon

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