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Date: 28 Nov 2006 07:30:05
From: Mike
Subject: Roast Timing?
I have been home roasting for a couple of years now. During this time I
have been using a Hot Top and a BBQ (RK Drums). When using the BBQ I aim
to attain the same taste as the HT would give me. Living 500 miles north
of Toronto and roasting outside can sometimes make this process difficult.

I have looked in a number of places with out any success. I am wondering
if there is an ideal (average) length of time to aim for between first
and second crack. I realize that this varies when dealing with beans
from different countries. Am I wrong in assuming that if the rate at
which the bean meets second crack (if taken that far)is consistent, we
are then bringing out the best flavors in the cup???

Regards,
Mike




 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 19:26:43
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: Roast Timing?
On Tue, 28 Nov 2006 07:30:05 -0500, Mike <mpp@onlink.net > wrote:

>I have looked in a number of places with out any success. I am wondering
>if there is an ideal (average) length of time to aim for between first
>and second crack. I realize that this varies when dealing with beans
>from different countries. Am I wrong in assuming that if the rate at
>which the bean meets second crack (if taken that far)is consistent, we
>are then bringing out the best flavors in the cup???

As in the other thread -- there's three phases

1. drying up to 300F bean temp: If a light roast tastes green, sour,
vinegary, etc, go slower here; if the coffee tastes faded, go faster
here.

2. From 300F to 1st crack: basically go as fast as you can while
keeping the beans even colored.

3. From 1st crack to roast end.
a) The acidity will depend mostly on how long you've roasted. A
long roast will reduce the acidity and the origin tastes. This is
useful for espresso, and in the case of very, very light roasts, for
brewing as well. A long light roast will taste maximally sweet.
b) The roast taste will depend priily on how dark you roast.
For instance, for a dark roast that still has some acidity, finish it
like a speed maniac. For a light espresso roast without much
caramelization or acid, do a very slow roast and stop ahead of the
second crack.

Finally. There's the source heating temperature (or maximum
environmental temperature -- MET) The speed limit on any roaster is
that these should not exceed 500F to 520F, otherwise the surface of
the bean suffers damage. If you're roaster is too slow at this MET,
consider insulating or adding forced air. My personal preference is
around 480F to 500F MET, although 500F to 520F is good too. Lower than
this, the roast flavors seem to go from nothing at all to ashy in one
jump.

The actual length of these phases will depend on the roasting device
you are using. Those with a lot of airflow to beanmass roast faster
than those with little airflow, even when source heating temperatures
are the same.


 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 17:36:29
From: unknown
Subject: Re: Roast Timing?
I use the RK Drum on a Brinkmann Grill. I Roast at 550 F. First Crack at
10:30-11:30. Second goes between 3 and 4 minutes later. All the coffee
comes out very good. I pull all of it at the first sound of the second
crack. I also am looking for an answer to your question but I have come to
think that the timing is not that criticle since it all comes out really
good if it is betweeen those numbers. I have had mine for 4 years and have
roasted 100's of pounds. I would love to hear your times and if you are
happy.
regards!
"Mike" <mpp@onlink.net > wrote in message
news:992f0$456c2bc7$ce82db33$29260@PRIMUS.CA...
>I have been home roasting for a couple of years now. During this time I
>have been using a Hot Top and a BBQ (RK Drums). When using the BBQ I aim to
>attain the same taste as the HT would give me. Living 500 miles north of
>Toronto and roasting outside can sometimes make this process difficult.
>
> I have looked in a number of places with out any success. I am wondering
> if there is an ideal (average) length of time to aim for between first and
> second crack. I realize that this varies when dealing with beans from
> different countries. Am I wrong in assuming that if the rate at which the
> bean meets second crack (if taken that far)is consistent, we are then
> bringing out the best flavors in the cup???
>
> Regards,
> Mike




  
Date: 29 Nov 2006 08:48:02
From: Mike
Subject: Re: Roast Timing?
unknown wrote:
> I use the RK Drum on a Brinkmann Grill. I Roast at 550 F. First Crack at
> 10:30-11:30. Second goes between 3 and 4 minutes later. All the coffee
> comes out very good. I pull all of it at the first sound of the second
> crack. I also am looking for an answer to your question but I have come to
> think that the timing is not that criticle since it all comes out really
> good if it is betweeen those numbers. I have had mine for 4 years and have
> roasted 100's of pounds. I would love to hear your times and if you are
> happy.
> regards!
> "Mike" <mpp@onlink.net> wrote in message
> news:992f0$456c2bc7$ce82db33$29260@PRIMUS.CA...
>> I have been home roasting for a couple of years now. During this time I
>> have been using a Hot Top and a BBQ (RK Drums). When using the BBQ I aim to
>> attain the same taste as the HT would give me. Living 500 miles north of
>> Toronto and roasting outside can sometimes make this process difficult.
>>
>> I have looked in a number of places with out any success. I am wondering
>> if there is an ideal (average) length of time to aim for between first and
>> second crack. I realize that this varies when dealing with beans from
>> different countries. Am I wrong in assuming that if the rate at which the
>> bean meets second crack (if taken that far)is consistent, we are then
>> bringing out the best flavors in the cup???
>>
>> Regards,
>> Mike
>
>
Nice to hear from another RK user. It sounds like we have a very similar
roasting method. Most of my roasts are also pulled at the start of 2nd
crack. My times though are longer than yours. Are you possibly roasting
a little over a pound? I have had my roaster and the Hot Top for 2 years
now. I am very pleased with both. The only change I made to the RK was
to add bearings at both ends of the rod. Before doing this my neighbors
thought I had a revolving roof vent that needed greasing. Also it makes
hearing the cracks much easier. The only maintenance needed is spraying
the bearing with Pam to keep them lubricated.

For most of my roasts (4 lbs) I am hitting 1 crack anywhere between
17:00 and 20:00 depending on the bean. Through out most of the roast I
keep the temperature between 525-550. At the first sounds of a bean
entering 1st crack I turn the temperature up all the way. When the
sounds of first crack start to diminish I turn the temp back until the
gauge reads just below 500. I usually wait 2-3 minutes then crank the
heat on full so that 2 crack is started soon after. Most of my roasts
are done in this fashion.

Mike


   
Date: 29 Nov 2006 18:42:29
From: default
Subject: Re: Roast Timing?
Mike,
You are experienced! I am doing 1lb. 4 oz. This has given me the best
results. I keep the temperature at 525-550. I have an accurate thermometer
but in the Brinkmann it is at the top of the drum. I also use a heavy
aluminum plate that shields the drum from direct flames. I leave the
temperature even throughout the roasting cycle. Sometimes I go through as
many as 4 cycles. I don't do more at a time because I like to have several
different kinds. I have looked for bearings but can't find any that would
slip over my rod. Could you point me toward where you bought yours? Ron
suggested using white lithium grease. As usual he is right I only have to
lube the fixed round bearing 3 time a year. I love my RK drum. It sounds
like we are both doing about the same thing, except for the mass in each
load.
Happy Roasting!

"Mike" <mpp@onlink.net > wrote in message
news:3036b$456d8f89$ce82db33$3124@PRIMUS.CA...
> unknown wrote:
>> I use the RK Drum on a Brinkmann Grill. I Roast at 550 F. First Crack
>> at 10:30-11:30. Second goes between 3 and 4 minutes later. All the
>> coffee comes out very good. I pull all of it at the first sound of the
>> second crack. I also am looking for an answer to your question but I
>> have come to think that the timing is not that criticle since it all
>> comes out really good if it is betweeen those numbers. I have had mine
>> for 4 years and have roasted 100's of pounds. I would love to hear your
>> times and if you are happy.
>> regards!
>> "Mike" <mpp@onlink.net> wrote in message
>> news:992f0$456c2bc7$ce82db33$29260@PRIMUS.CA...
>>> I have been home roasting for a couple of years now. During this time I
>>> have been using a Hot Top and a BBQ (RK Drums). When using the BBQ I aim
>>> to attain the same taste as the HT would give me. Living 500 miles north
>>> of Toronto and roasting outside can sometimes make this process
>>> difficult.
>>>
>>> I have looked in a number of places with out any success. I am wondering
>>> if there is an ideal (average) length of time to aim for between first
>>> and second crack. I realize that this varies when dealing with beans
>>> from different countries. Am I wrong in assuming that if the rate at
>>> which the bean meets second crack (if taken that far)is consistent, we
>>> are then bringing out the best flavors in the cup???
>>>
>>> Regards,
>>> Mike
>>
>>
> Nice to hear from another RK user. It sounds like we have a very similar
> roasting method. Most of my roasts are also pulled at the start of 2nd
> crack. My times though are longer than yours. Are you possibly roasting a
> little over a pound? I have had my roaster and the Hot Top for 2 years
> now. I am very pleased with both. The only change I made to the RK was to
> add bearings at both ends of the rod. Before doing this my neighbors
> thought I had a revolving roof vent that needed greasing. Also it makes
> hearing the cracks much easier. The only maintenance needed is spraying
> the bearing with Pam to keep them lubricated.
>
> For most of my roasts (4 lbs) I am hitting 1 crack anywhere between 17:00
> and 20:00 depending on the bean. Through out most of the roast I keep the
> temperature between 525-550. At the first sounds of a bean entering 1st
> crack I turn the temperature up all the way. When the sounds of first
> crack start to diminish I turn the temp back until the gauge reads just
> below 500. I usually wait 2-3 minutes then crank the heat on full so that
> 2 crack is started soon after. Most of my roasts are done in this fashion.
>
> Mike