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Date: 18 Apr 2007 03:47:40
From: vMike
Subject: Roaster taste profile question
I have been roasting beans for several years now for espresso. My current
roaster is a HotTop. Over the years, I have tried many varieties of coffee,
most of them are deemed most suitable for darker roasts. I have found that
except for a few varieties, most of them taste very much the same if I roast
them to the same point. I have noticed this to be especially true as the
roaster has aged. So my question is "Does a roaster develop a taste profile
independent of the bean, or is it my choices of beans?" I have never seen
that discussed here.

Mike






 
Date: 23 Apr 2007 00:47:30
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
On Apr 19, 12:29 am, yoma <y...@yoma.net.au > wrote:
>
> To some degree, I'd say my Hottop (digital) does (did) have it's own
> taste profile. This isn't surprising since it's basically programmed to
> follow an internal profile (or minor variations thereof).
>
> I certainly got a significant change in the tastes - after I pulled out
> the controller board and replaced it with manual heat/fan controls.


Been meaning to have a look at adjusting the fan speed on an IRoast,
to see what it's capable all the way up and all out. As it is, I cram
it with heavy loads. With significant added air circulation, I may be
able to keep the bean output up for a better roast if given a minute
or two longer -- a delicate stage after 1st but before 2nd cracks, for
roasting something past light. As it is, beyond first crack, it's too
fast into darker, smoke and burnt roasts. First, though, I've a large
roll of house screening, and need construct a secondary, secure chaff
retainer. The few flecks of chaff the IRoast doesn't catch, even
exhausting odors under a rangehood, are annoying to me, considered
from a cumulative effect indoors. With luck, I'll have an airbed
optimzed for a generic light-roast capablity, to let the beans adapt
for flavors based within that near constant.



 
Date: 19 Apr 2007 14:29:35
From: yoma
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
vMike wrote:
> "Does a roaster develop a taste profile
> independent of the bean, or is it my choices of beans?"

To some degree, I'd say my Hottop (digital) does (did) have it's own
taste profile. This isn't surprising since it's basically programmed to
follow an internal profile (or minor variations thereof).

I certainly got a significant change in the tastes - after I pulled out
the controller board and replaced it with manual heat/fan controls.


 
Date: 18 Apr 2007 07:55:51
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
"vMike" <MicZhaYel.GeoZrgeY@noYandZ.geZwaYrrenZ.com > wrote:

>I have been roasting beans for several years now for espresso. My current
>roaster is a HotTop. Over the years, I have tried many varieties of coffee,
>most of them are deemed most suitable for darker roasts. I have found that
>except for a few varieties, most of them taste very much the same if I roast
>them to the same point. I have noticed this to be especially true as the
>roaster has aged. So my question is "Does a roaster develop a taste profile
>independent of the bean, or is it my choices of beans?" I have never seen
>that discussed here.
>


As Jim said, the darker you roast the more similar the coffees will
taste. Unless the Hottop is particularly filthy or the filter has not
been changed in a long time, the change in the taste profile is more
likely caused by some factor in your brewing procedures or maybe even
a result of a more experienced palate.

Try this- Use level "7" (or program the full 21:59- you didn't say
what model you have). Roast about 220 grams and add the beans about
5:00 after the machine signals you to add the beans. See if you can
taste the difference in the roast.

If you have not done so in a long time, the roaster might need to be
cleaned. Remove the drum and all other loose parts and blow the
roaster out with compressed air. Replace the filter if you have not
done so in a while. Soak the drum in TSP or other suitable cleaner and
clean the roasting chamber- paying particular attention to the
temperature sensor in the back wall. Remove the top filter and clean
that as well.

See my page of Hottop FAQs for more info.


Randy "how many Hottops is too many Hottops?" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com




  
Date: 19 Apr 2007 14:40:35
From: yoma
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
Randy G. wrote:
>
> If you have not done so in a long time, the roaster might need to be
> cleaned. Remove the drum and all other loose parts and blow the
> roaster out with compressed air. Replace the filter if you have not
> done so in a while. Soak the drum in TSP or other suitable cleaner and
> clean the roasting chamber- paying particular attention to the
> temperature sensor in the back wall. Remove the top filter and clean
> that as well.

I've always wondered how much difference cleaning makes.
The Hottop guide recommends around every 5 roasts.

Statistically I've found I often get better roasts with in the first 3
or so batches after a clean, and 'lesser' roasts after 5, or so batches.

I'm curious to know how often a 'pro' roaster is cleaned?


   
Date: 19 Apr 2007 10:37:23
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 14:40:35 +1000, yoma <yoma@yoma.net.au > wrote:

>Statistically I've found I often get better roasts with in the first 3
>or so batches after a clean, and 'lesser' roasts after 5, or so batches.

Care to expound on the differences?


    
Date: 23 Apr 2007 16:11:13
From: yoma
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
I- >Ian wrote:
> On Thu, 19 Apr 2007 14:40:35 +1000, yoma <yoma@yoma.net.au> wrote:
>
>> Statistically I've found I often get better roasts with in the first 3
>> or so batches after a clean, and 'lesser' roasts after 5, or so batches.
>
> Care to expound on the differences?


I find I can't replicate good roasts after the the 4th or 5th batch,
until I clean the drum at at least.

Subsequent roasts taste 'flatter/thinner' to some extent - similar in
effect to the way an espresso machine in-need-of-clean strips out some
of the coffee flavours.


   
Date: 19 Apr 2007 10:31:01
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
yoma <yoma@yoma.net.au > wrote:

>Randy G. wrote:
>>
>> If you have not done so in a long time, the roaster might need to be
>> cleaned. Remove the drum and all other loose parts and blow the
>> roaster out with compressed air. Replace the filter if you have not
>> done so in a while. Soak the drum in TSP or other suitable cleaner and
>> clean the roasting chamber- paying particular attention to the
>> temperature sensor in the back wall. Remove the top filter and clean
>> that as well.
>
>I've always wondered how much difference cleaning makes.
>The Hottop guide recommends around every 5 roasts.
>
I think that every 5 roasts is a bit excessive for a thorough
cleaning. I would think that if you have a source of compressed air
and blow the roaster out after every one or two roasts to keep the
roaster clean of chaff and bean bits then you could probably change
that to once every 50 roasts, exclusive of the main filter which would
not last that long.

>Statistically I've found I often get better roasts with in the first 3
>or so batches after a clean, and 'lesser' roasts after 5, or so batches.
>
I would think that this is more a matter of keeping the rear filter
clean so as to allow more effective clearing of smoke from the
chamber.


Randy "take a shower once a week whether you need it or not" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com




    
Date: 23 Apr 2007 16:26:44
From: yoma
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
Randy G. wrote:
> yoma <yoma@yoma.net.au> wrote:
>
> I think that every 5 roasts is a bit excessive for a thorough
> cleaning. I would think that if you have a source of compressed air
> and blow the roaster out after every one or two roasts to keep the
> roaster clean of chaff and bean bits then you could probably change
> that to once every 50 roasts, exclusive of the main filter which would
> not last that long.

I agree, 5 roasts is excessive for major cleans.
I only wash the drum and front cover with dishwashing liquid and hot
water every 5 roasts. This seems to remove the 'surface build up' that
I suspect/imagine to affect the roast.

>
>> Statistically I've found I often get better roasts with in the first 3
>> or so batches after a clean, and 'lesser' roasts after 5, or so batches.
>>
> I would think that this is more a matter of keeping the rear filter
> clean so as to allow more effective clearing of smoke from the
> chamber.

I found 'drilling' some breather holes in the drop-in chute cover
reduces the effects of filter-gunk build up. And just in case you're
wondering, I discovered this by accident.

At one stage I was using a couple of narrow diameter thermocouples held
in place partly by the weight of a slightly dislodged bean chute cover.

After I permanently secured the thermocouples in place, the quality and
consistency of roasts took a dive. The only difference was the slight
I'd closed the gap due to the dislodged chute cover.


>
>
> Randy "take a shower once a week whether you need it or not" G.
> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>
>


 
Date: 18 Apr 2007 05:43:02
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: Roaster taste profile question
On Wed, 18 Apr 2007 03:47:40 -0400, "vMike"
<MicZhaYel.GeoZrgeY@noYandZ.geZwaYrrenZ.com > wrote:

> So my question is "Does a roaster develop a taste profile
>independent of the bean, or is it my choices of beans?" I have never seen
>that discussed here.

Depends on the roaster. The human roaster may do so, especially if he
or she likes the roasts dark. The mechanical roaster less so.

In general, coffees are most different when roasted light, and get
more similar as they are roasted darker.