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Date: 08 Apr 2007 16:40:00
From: Mordekhai@gmail.com
Subject: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
I need money to go to Europe! So after about of 6 months of on and off
use of my Pavoni, I have decided to sell it for extra plane money.
Comes with the side arm attachment for cappuccino, the two
portafilters (single and double), the original box and I will even
throw in my two espresso cups.

The heat has melted the very bottom of the top knob (no damage to the
threading) and a partial bit of the plastic sight tube, both can be
easily replaced and effect nothing with the use of the machine.

I can send all the pictures you need, but for two, go here:
http://www.studentediting.com/ofinterest.html

I'd like to use Paypal, unless you are in the general san antonio area.





 
Date: 09 Apr 2007 21:27:17
From: Mordekhai@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
I remember it was the initial smell, after she turned it off....this
doesnt sound encouraging, at all. Would any offers be pertinent? Any
other advice besides shipping it to some dealer in San Francisco?



  
Date: 10 Apr 2007 15:08:29
From: wff_ng_7
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
<Mordekhai@gmail.com > wrote:
>I remember it was the initial smell, after she turned it off....this
> doesnt sound encouraging, at all. Would any offers be pertinent? Any
> other advice besides shipping it to some dealer in San Francisco?

The best thing to do would seem to be selling it to someone who was
proficient in working on Pavonis so they could deal with whatever might be
damaged. But it's like a car that has been in an accident; your average
person on the street isn't going to know how to assess the potential damage
and know how to fix it. Therefore it's hard to assign a value to it. In any
case, even an expert is going to significantly discount the value of a
damaged machine below one that is just "used".

I suspect you were unfortunate in having two "failures" which compounded the
problem. The first was running it dry (I can't imagine it heating up enough
to cause damage with water in it). The second is the overheat protection
must have failed. There is a thermal fuse inside the base attached to the
heating element. If your machine is within the last decade or so (which I
presume it is), the fuse is a resettable type with a red button on it,
directly on the center under the boiler (under the bottom cover). Older ones
have fuses that must be replaced if blown. I'm thinking this thermal fuse is
defective and did not shut the machine off when it should have. Did you have
to reset it? At a minimum, I'd want to get this thermal fuse replaced. Aside
from the potential damage to seals from overheating, the heating element
itself can have its life shortened dramatically.

I guess the more unethical among us might just buy a new boiler lid and
sight glass shield, slap those on and call it fixed. And then sell it on
eBay "as is". Knowing that is the reason I'm leary of buying certain things
used.

If you want some more detail on the guts of a Pavoni, including where the
thermal fuse is located and how to rebuild the machine, the following web
site has a lot of info:

http://www.pavoniexpress.com/

--
wff_ng_7 (at) verizon (dot) net



   
Date: 10 Apr 2007 13:14:35
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
Thermal fuses are almost foolproof - if it didn't melt it didn't get hot
enough to melt. The machine still works, apparently. If I were selling it
I'd repair the broken parts and sell the machine as being in good used
condition. The cost of the repair (if you do the labor yourself) would be
less than the loss in value from selling the machine as defective. Given how
long the machine has worked since the overheat incident I don't think there
is more hidden damage.


"wff_ng_7" <nosuchuser@invalid.gov > wrote in message
news:NLNSh.3101$%l5.2231@trnddc05...
> <Mordekhai@gmail.com> wrote:
>>I remember it was the initial smell, after she turned it off....this
>> doesnt sound encouraging, at all. Would any offers be pertinent? Any
>> other advice besides shipping it to some dealer in San Francisco?
>
> The best thing to do would seem to be selling it to someone who was
> proficient in working on Pavonis so they could deal with whatever might be
> damaged. But it's like a car that has been in an accident; your average
> person on the street isn't going to know how to assess the potential
> damage and know how to fix it. Therefore it's hard to assign a value to
> it. In any case, even an expert is going to significantly discount the
> value of a damaged machine below one that is just "used".
>
> I suspect you were unfortunate in having two "failures" which compounded
> the problem. The first was running it dry (I can't imagine it heating up
> enough to cause damage with water in it). The second is the overheat
> protection must have failed. There is a thermal fuse inside the base
> attached to the heating element. If your machine is within the last decade
> or so (which I presume it is), the fuse is a resettable type with a red
> button on it, directly on the center under the boiler (under the bottom
> cover). Older ones have fuses that must be replaced if blown. I'm thinking
> this thermal fuse is defective and did not shut the machine off when it
> should have. Did you have to reset it? At a minimum, I'd want to get this
> thermal fuse replaced. Aside from the potential damage to seals from
> overheating, the heating element itself can have its life shortened
> dramatically.
>
> I guess the more unethical among us might just buy a new boiler lid and
> sight glass shield, slap those on and call it fixed. And then sell it on
> eBay "as is". Knowing that is the reason I'm leary of buying certain
> things used.
>
> If you want some more detail on the guts of a Pavoni, including where the
> thermal fuse is located and how to rebuild the machine, the following web
> site has a lot of info:
>
> http://www.pavoniexpress.com/
>
> --
> wff_ng_7 (at) verizon (dot) net




    
Date: 10 Apr 2007 17:29:26
From: wff_ng_7
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
"Jack Denver" <nunuvyer@netscape.net > wrote:
> Thermal fuses are almost foolproof - if it didn't melt it didn't get hot
> enough to melt. The machine still works, apparently. If I were selling it
> I'd repair the broken parts and sell the machine as being in good used
> condition. The cost of the repair (if you do the labor yourself) would be
> less than the loss in value from selling the machine as defective. Given
> how long the machine has worked since the overheat incident I don't think
> there is more hidden damage.

But how could the boiler lid melt without triggering the thermal fuse? I had
mine trigger once because I got distracted and didn't refill the boiler. It
shut off very fast, and I doubt the top of the boiler even got very warm,
let alone hot enough to melt the lid.

--
wff_ng_7 (at) verizon (dot) net



 
Date: 09 Apr 2007 07:52:46
From: daveb
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer


yeah -- a shame really.



 
Date: 08 Apr 2007 22:46:58
From: Mordekhai@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
After the amount I originally paid for it, I certainly checked it.
That was the result of the first/last time my girlfriend attempted to
use the machine. I've used it over the past 6 months now with zero
problems.



 
Date: 09 Apr 2007 00:28:36
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
If you don't mind, how did it come to be so hot? I'd be surprised if
something hadn't caught fire when the machine got hot enough to melt like
that. Did you inspect the wiring (connectors & insulation) to make sure
they're still safe & have the o-rings & gaskets checked for damage?
Seriously, it should never have been permitted to get that hot without doing
a tear-down & total rebuild!
--
Robert (Peacocks are great, but not roasted!) Harmon
www.tinyurl.com/34r5dx - My attempt at blogging.
www.tinyurl.com/2tnv87 - Guidelines for coffee newbies.
www.tinyurl.com/37gwfr - I have stuff available for sale.

<Mordekhai@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1176075599.979217.261050@n76g2000hsh.googlegroups.com...
>I need money to go to Europe! So after about of 6 months of on and off
> use of my Pavoni, I have decided to sell it for extra plane money.
> Comes with the side arm attachment for cappuccino, the two
> portafilters (single and double), the original box and I will even
> throw in my two espresso cups.
>
> The heat has melted the very bottom of the top knob (no damage to the
> threading) and a partial bit of the plastic sight tube, both can be
> easily replaced and effect nothing with the use of the machine.
>
> I can send all the pictures you need, but for two, go here:
> http://www.studentediting.com/ofinterest.html
>
> I'd like to use Paypal, unless you are in the general san antonio area.
>




  
Date: 09 Apr 2007 16:42:33
From: wff_ng_7
Subject: Re: Selling La Pavoni Europiccola Lusso $300 or better offer
"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com > wrote:
> If you don't mind, how did it come to be so hot? I'd be surprised if
> something hadn't caught fire when the machine got hot enough to melt like
> that. Did you inspect the wiring (connectors & insulation) to make sure
> they're still safe & have the o-rings & gaskets checked for damage?
> Seriously, it should never have been permitted to get that hot without
> doing a tear-down & total rebuild!

It would seem to me the only way for it to get that hot is if it was allowed
to boil dry (or be turned on dry) and then have the overheat protection
sensor fail to turn off the heating element. If it was hot enough to melt
the boiler lid and sight glass shield, I'd think there's potential damage to
the sight glass seals and parts inside the base. The seals in the group are
probably far enough away to escape damage. I'd certainly want to have the
machine checked out before using it. That it seems to work fine would not be
enough for me. At a minimum, I'd expect the overheating to shorten the life
of the machine before something fails.

Did the machine eventually turn itself off, or was the smell of something
burning cause for someone to come by and turn it off?

--
wff_ng_7 (at) verizon (dot) net