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Date: 26 Apr 2007 23:13:58
From:
Subject: Specialty Coffee Definition
Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
coffee?"

Specialty coffee is a vision that recognizes ideas of uncompromising
quality, freshness and care from the farm hand to those who prepare
and serve the beverage. The concept of specialty coffee is a bias for
the best that leads to a rewarding partnership between people at
origin and destination and a beverage of outstanding cup quality.

Donald Schoenholt
aka: i840coffee





 
Date: 30 Apr 2007 16:21:25
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 30, 5:20 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> You seem to reject even the prospect of "explaining" specialty coffee
> to someone who knows little (or a lot?) about coffee. You would find
> out what they are currently drinking and then try to direct them to
> coffee that you think they might notice as "better." It would
> largely be a non-descriptive, non-verbal response. Am I close?
> Martin

In one sense an empirical response may most directly pertain to being
better, in as much bias is attributable to claims of specialty that
otherwise lack certification or suitable credentials;- that for
probability to remain a fair bet, based on substantive expenditures
given others the sense to derive a fair trade assessment, as might be
given under marketable names, such as Intelligensia. Chance then
favors greater leeway of accountability to deviate at some lesser
extent from what sense best has to impart in discrete information
systems. An empirical judgment then occurs both tempered as practical
and sense greater consent accords. To be most direct within systems
is to be most alike qualities closest axiomatic, for need of an
imperative axiom specialty coffee exclusively, as it were, confers.



 
Date: 30 Apr 2007 14:20:28
From:
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 30, 7:46 am, Flasherly <gjerr...@ij.net > wrote:
> On Apr 29, 11:54 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>

snip .. >>> Imagine someone who is mildly curious
> > and has limited patience.
> > Martin

>
> There a lot of posts and considerations to condense into one
> "convenient" paragraph.
Not asking you to condense what others say.

> Don really does a good job of amplifying the
> ramifications of Martin's succinct note.
Or evaluate.

>The best chance for a
> hypothetical bystander to obtain a truthful, objective judgment
I like truth and objectivity. But that wasn't what I asked you for.
What's your "opinion"? Briefly, now.

>The closest I'm seeing to uniformity across quality is from
> Hawaiian growers. Perhaps Hawaiians are most uniform as regionally
> reducible, different in dynamics from an end destination of diverse SO
> distribution chains vying for higher distinction across a competitive
> market bases, (no less globally), as each purveyor indeed must tout
> out his or her unique qualifications above a less germane constituency
> of profit incentives.
You are drifting again. Try to remain focused.

> Beyond which, to a typical person, being me, I'd again recommend next
> isle over, one past the Mateus, and go ahead and give Albertson's
> beanbin label -Morning Roast- a shot. As long as my roasts taste the
> way they do, and I do like them, I can honestly say that. (No need
> for them to buy a roaster, although I'll keep mine, all the same).
"Honestly say" what? How has the topic changed to your roasting?

> All
> I need know is the tastes are similar enough to be miles above common
> American brewed coffee. However, if our hypothesis turns to ask me,
What's the hypothesis here? Must be one that you raised and then
"turned," but I can't identify either.

> 'Specifically, how many light years behind Fine SCAA-endorsed
> Specialty Coffee will that be'. . . hope you won't mind if I tell them
> to ask the guy in the next isle over eyeing the wines.
You seem to reject even the prospect of "explaining" specialty coffee
to someone who knows little (or a lot?) about coffee. You would find
out what they are currently drinking and then try to direct them to
coffee that you think they might notice as "better." It would
largely be a non-descriptive, non-verbal response. Am I close?
Martin



 
Date: 30 Apr 2007 07:46:41
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 29, 11:54 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> ". . .benign but well-intended. . ." I get it. You really like it.
> The remainder of your post doesn't address my second and more
> important question (although it took three difficult readings to
> figure that out): "How would YOU respond to the typical person who
> 'knows nothing about coffee'"? Imagine someone who is mildly curious
> and has limited patience.
> Martin

There a lot of posts and considerations to condense into one
"convenient" paragraph. Don really does a good job of amplifying the
ramifications of Martin's succinct note. The best chance for a
hypothetical bystander to obtain a truthful, objective judgment of
what the realm of specialty coffee has to offer, is to attend the
specialists' meetings or acquire an endorsed source for Shane's
definition of destination. Too many uncertainties exist in marketing
without an impartial arbitrator - without a coveted Stamp of
Approval. The closest I'm seeing to uniformity across quality is from
Hawaiian growers. Perhaps Hawaiians are most uniform as regionally
reducible, different in dynamics from an end destination of diverse SO
distribution chains vying for higher distinction across a competitive
market bases, (no less globally), as each purveyor indeed must tout
out his or her unique qualifications above a less germane constituency
of profit incentives.

Beyond which, to a typical person, being me, I'd again recommend next
isle over, one past the Mateus, and go ahead and give Albertson's
beanbin label -Morning Roast- a shot. As long as my roasts taste the
way they do, and I do like them, I can honestly say that. (No need
for them to buy a roaster, although I'll keep mine, all the same). All
I need know is the tastes are similar enough to be miles above common
American brewed coffee. However, if our hypothesis turns to ask me,
'Specifically, how many light years behind Fine SCAA-endorsed
Specialty Coffee will that be'. . . hope you won't mind if I tell them
to ask the guy in the next isle over eyeing the wines.



 
Date: 29 Apr 2007 20:54:58
From:
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 29, 6:30 pm, Flasherly <gjerr...@ij.net > wrote:
> On Apr 29, 5:57 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>
> > So, Flasherl, does that mean that you like my analogy? I especially
> > enjoy the challenge of making complex ideas accessible to all sorts of
> > audiences. Donald's definition of "specialty" responded in substance
> > and tone to the OP's question, and I gave my best shot at preserving
> > that tone. How would you respond to the typical person who "knows
> > nothing about coffee"?
>
> > Martin
>
> Apart from being a little stacked it's a benign but well-intended
> construct. Robert then says in practice the application of precise
> formatives is affected because of derivations from preexisting notions
> closely allied to the industry. Actually, he doesn't. He insularly
> stated in defining specialty coffee that it is what "we" enjoy.
> Specialists. That's just me, the affected. That there is two-way
> transferences, from the bottom up and top down. One one hand, there's
> the guy at his shop trying to pour an espresso machiato to someone
> expecting a dairy-curl, whilst said dairy-curl potentially receives an
> indoctrination into the finesse of admixing. Point being, a two-way
> interaction occurred: each signifies a modifier to an end designating
> specialty. Note now, however, that Jim would adamantly disagree. A
> median coffee, better than some, a taste finer, is not an allowable
> concession or marketable juncture for specialty coffees to occur.
> That point must be one better, higher [for tasting accountability].
> The result is people don't know what that is, other than to defer to a
> sense for better judgment from prior empirical knowledge;- sic., we
> came, we saw, we purchased a can of preground Yuban, then we left and
> bought a grinder and roaster. Each event is a positive inference,
> each successive step a finer taste;- reason therefore accounts, a
> priori, to augment a fortitude that persists within such auspices. Or
> is it. . . Your piggyback construct. Regardless whether the
> connoisseur of specialists will waive his knowledge of coffees before
> wine tasters is benign;-- Whether I like a white or pink bottle of
> Mateus from the supermarket well enough to drink the entire bottle to
> be subsequently buzzed doesn't matter, either;-- Any more than need my
> deference to fine coffee from the coffee bins the next isle over.
> It's simply all that I have from which to know what I do. I'm a
> reasonable sort, a quality of being a little on the cheap side when
> accounting measures I permit myself. Every crowd has its silver
> lining, as 'every coffee its market' -- Marshall's most compelling
> evidence, pragmatically;- Stylistically, though, I don't believe
> Marshall's argument refutes Jim's avowal that the specialist's coffee
> is less finer tasting than means commonly presented [the rest of us].
> But for matters of degree and comparative values and a thought to
> venture.

". . .benign but well-intended. . ." I get it. You really like it.
The remainder of your post doesn't address my second and more
important question (although it took three difficult readings to
figure that out): "How would YOU respond to the typical person who
'knows nothing about coffee'"? Imagine someone who is mildly curious
and has limited patience.
Martin




 
Date: 29 Apr 2007 18:30:16
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 29, 5:57 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
>
> So, Flasherl, does that mean that you like my analogy? I especially
> enjoy the challenge of making complex ideas accessible to all sorts of
> audiences. Donald's definition of "specialty" responded in substance
> and tone to the OP's question, and I gave my best shot at preserving
> that tone. How would you respond to the typical person who "knows
> nothing about coffee"?
>
> Martin

Apart from being a little stacked it's a benign but well-intended
construct. Robert then says in practice the application of precise
formatives is affected because of derivations from preexisting notions
closely allied to the industry. Actually, he doesn't. He insularly
stated in defining specialty coffee that it is what "we" enjoy.
Specialists. That's just me, the affected. That there is two-way
transferences, from the bottom up and top down. One one hand, there's
the guy at his shop trying to pour an espresso machiato to someone
expecting a dairy-curl, whilst said dairy-curl potentially receives an
indoctrination into the finesse of admixing. Point being, a two-way
interaction occurred: each signifies a modifier to an end designating
specialty. Note now, however, that Jim would adamantly disagree. A
median coffee, better than some, a taste finer, is not an allowable
concession or marketable juncture for specialty coffees to occur.
That point must be one better, higher [for tasting accountability].
The result is people don't know what that is, other than to defer to a
sense for better judgment from prior empirical knowledge;- sic., we
came, we saw, we purchased a can of preground Yuban, then we left and
bought a grinder and roaster. Each event is a positive inference,
each successive step a finer taste;- reason therefore accounts, a
priori, to augment a fortitude that persists within such auspices. Or
is it. . . Your piggyback construct. Regardless whether the
connoisseur of specialists will waive his knowledge of coffees before
wine tasters is benign;-- Whether I like a white or pink bottle of
Mateus from the supermarket well enough to drink the entire bottle to
be subsequently buzzed doesn't matter, either;-- Any more than need my
deference to fine coffee from the coffee bins the next isle over.
It's simply all that I have from which to know what I do. I'm a
reasonable sort, a quality of being a little on the cheap side when
accounting measures I permit myself. Every crowd has its silver
lining, as 'every coffee its market' -- Marshall's most compelling
evidence, pragmatically;- Stylistically, though, I don't believe
Marshall's argument refutes Jim's avowal that the specialist's coffee
is less finer tasting than means commonly presented [the rest of us].
But for matters of degree and comparative values and a thought to
venture.



 
Date: 29 Apr 2007 14:57:11
From:
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 28, 7:55 am, Flasherly <gjerr...@ij.net > wrote:
> On Apr 27, 5:18 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
>
>
>
> > On Apr 26, 11:13 pm, i840cof...@optonline.net wrote:
>
> > > Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
> > > concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
> > > coffee?"

> > Specialty coffee is like "the best" wine. Exactly where it is grown
> > makes a big difference. Farmers take "uncompromising" care with
> > growing and harvesting. Wholesalers, roasters, vendors and finally,
> > the consumers all depend on one another for "outstanding cup
> > quality."
> > Martin

> Should I, it would
> be based on a mean average from hypothetical skews existing in
> equidistance, such that taste, a standard of deviation from its
> accountability, were logarithmically a measure of inferences derived
> between horrible and fine coffee, apart from mean sufficiency;-- then,
> for a horrible coffee to be at a cost factor measured below sufficient
> coffee, such that fine coffee exists as a correlate to the former
> difference, at a value within reason price exceeds.

So, Flasherl, does that mean that you like my analogy? I especially
enjoy the challenge of making complex ideas accessible to all sorts of
audiences. Donald's definition of "specialty" responded in substance
and tone to the OP's question, and I gave my best shot at preserving
that tone. How would you respond to the typical person who "knows
nothing about coffee"?

Martin



 
Date: 28 Apr 2007 07:55:09
From: Flasherly
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 27, 5:18 pm, coffeeem...@gmail.com wrote:
> On Apr 26, 11:13 pm, i840cof...@optonline.net wrote:
>
> > Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
> > concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
> > coffee?"
>
> > Specialty coffee is a vision that recognizes ideas of uncompromising
> > quality, freshness and care from the farm hand to those who prepare
> > and serve the beverage. The concept of specialty coffee is a bias for
> > the best that leads to a rewarding partnership between people at
> > origin and destination and a beverage of outstanding cup quality.
>
> I find it useful to "piggyback" on people's knowledge of wine which is
> more extensive than what they know about coffee----here in CA, at
> least. This is roughly what tell them (now, with attention to
> Donald's key points).
>
> Regular coffee is like the supermarket wine that comes in a jug or a
> box. People buy it because it's cheap, it's what they are used to,
> and/or they like the buzz they get. It's made from the cheapest
> grapes in large factories.
>
> Specialty coffee is like "the best" wine. Exactly where it is grown
> makes a big difference. Farmers take "uncompromising" care with
> growing and harvesting. Wholesalers, roasters, vendors and finally,
> the consumers all depend on one another for "outstanding cup
> quality."
> Martin

There, in CA . . . "Napa and Sonoma wines can never compete on price
for very long and still be economically viable, but must always
compete on quality and scarcity. The market is saturated with
inexpensive Central Valley wine that can and is having a minor and
temporary rub on the premium wine market. New wineries trying to
pierce the ultra premium market will retreat to reasonable pricing,
wineries with a proven track record for quality will continue with
strong demand and the consumer will enjoy the benefit of low pricing
for ordinary quality wine. [Western Farm Press].

Then there's distinction. Can significance be distinguished between
good quality and outstanding quality, and at what premium on the
strike can price be justifiably qualified. Scarcity is extensible,
however, from the wine analogy. Consider Sumatra and Jamaican Blue
Mountain coffees for prime examples. Due to geopolitical and
agricultural marketing factors, they're produce apt to be diffused for
profits on lesser principled mixes -- still in large and nevertheless
sustainable for demand perceived in a quality ceded prior grading
standards. Knowing "in the know" whether consigned mixes are then to
be relegated inferior from prior practises of not mixing bean stock,
or whether marketed trends are to be perceived as viably superior
across a comparative range of goods available, is a fate taste must
test, so in order to arise least compromised.

At a median strike, I find supermarketed coffee good enough to be
considered closer than not to fine coffee. Whole bin beans marketed
for fresh produce from southeastern Albertson's retail outlets.
Samples I found similarly if not identically priced, yet overall
superior in taste to sealed brand containers of modestly valued whole
beans and grounds, respectively, and exclusive of a top-shelf skew of
gourmet blends marketed at a highest premium. To reiterate, to date,
I've resisted temptation to grab from the top tier. Should I, it would
be based on a mean average from hypothetical skews existing in
equidistance, such that taste, a standard of deviation from its
accountability, were logarithmically a measure of inferences derived
between horrible and fine coffee, apart from mean sufficiency;-- then,
for a horrible coffee to be at a cost factor measured below sufficient
coffee, such that fine coffee exists as a correlate to the former
difference, at a value within reason price exceeds. What I suspect,
however, is that fine supermarketed coffee brands exist at a premium
not within reason taste most widely accords, that somewhat above a
median for samples given in bean bins, broadly sustained, there may
exist distinction at a higher measure of deviation from worst samples
of horrible coffee. In sum, coffee above $12# may not taste twice as
good as sufficient coffee at $6#;-- however, since coffee at $3# may
taste more than twice bad as sufficient $6# coffee, a ratio of
deviation is twice likely to favor propitious taste closer to a mean
variance from $6# coffee.



 
Date: 27 Apr 2007 14:18:29
From:
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Apr 26, 11:13 pm, i840cof...@optonline.net wrote:
> Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
> concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
> coffee?"
>
> Specialty coffee is a vision that recognizes ideas of uncompromising
> quality, freshness and care from the farm hand to those who prepare
> and serve the beverage. The concept of specialty coffee is a bias for
> the best that leads to a rewarding partnership between people at
> origin and destination and a beverage of outstanding cup quality.

I find it useful to "piggyback" on people's knowledge of wine which is
more extensive than what they know about coffee----here in CA, at
least. This is roughly what tell them (now, with attention to
Donald's key points).

Regular coffee is like the supermarket wine that comes in a jug or a
box. People buy it because it's cheap, it's what they are used to,
and/or they like the buzz they get. It's made from the cheapest
grapes in large factories.

Specialty coffee is like "the best" wine. Exactly where it is grown
makes a big difference. Farmers take "uncompromising" care with
growing and harvesting. Wholesalers, roasters, vendors and finally,
the consumers all depend on one another for "outstanding cup
quality."
Martin



 
Date: 27 Apr 2007 20:28:29
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
i840coffee@optonline.net wrote:



  
Date: 28 Apr 2007 06:38:54
From: Donn Cave
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
Quoth ross@math.hawaii.NOSPAM.edu (D. Ross):


   
Date: 28 Apr 2007 11:16:27
From: D. Ross
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition


 
Date: 27 Apr 2007 12:00:21
From: shane
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
I have noticed a similar thing, that for a large number of people,
"coffee" is Folger's, Maxwell house etc. "special or fancy coffee"
is what is sold at Starbucks and similar shops. During my coffee
progression I recall, briefly, liking flavored coffee. Why? It was
more pleasant to drink than Folger's and I had not learned that
Specialty grade coffee existed. Most people seem content with
drinking lesser quality coffee.

One thought does occur to me, if Specialty Coffee only comprises 10%
of the annual coffee crop, someone needs to drink the other 90%.

Shane


On Apr 27, 12:56 pm, "Robert Harmon" <r_h_har...@Zhotmail.com > wrote:
> I'm late to this thread, but had to toss this in.
>
> I invited everyone from my neighborhood to come by & enjoy some "specialty
> coffee" I'd just roasted & blended (I also invited them to bring their home
> espresso & coffee machines along to do some side-by-side comparisons -
> another tale for another time.)
>
> I had ~50 people show up & we had a great time trying SO's & blends I'd
> roasted last week. The funny thing was that almost everyone not in my circle
> of coffee fanatic friends thought they were going to be served 'French
> vanilla, 'hazelnut', etc., flavored coffee. One couple even left when they
> found all I was serving was 'plain coffee'.
>
> So I guess specialty coffee has many meanings, but to the typical person out
> there it means something entirely different than it does to us. The coffee
> industry could help out with some informational ads in different media, but
> I doubt they'd go for that. If folks are happily buying the junk put out by
> Folger's, Maxwell House, etc., why tell them otherwise.
>
> So we'll continue to exist outside the mainstream of the coffee world;
> different perceptions, definitions, & standards. But, we'll have great
> coffee to console us.
> --
> Robert (Gig 'em!) Harmonwww.tinyurl.com/mb4uj- My coffee pageswww.tinyurl.com/2tnv87- Guidelines for newbies.www.tinyurl.com/37gwfr- I may have stuff available for sale here.<b...@smithfarms.com> wrote in message
>
> news:ab84335mrteof0nvh067gt8sd0usttf0tp@4ax.com...
>
>
>
> > On 26 Apr 2007 23:13:58 -0700, i840cof...@optonline.net wrote:
>
> >>Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
> >>concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
> >>coffee?"
>
> >>Specialty coffee is a vision that recognizes ideas of uncompromising
> >>quality, freshness and care from the farm hand to those who prepare
> >>and serve the beverage. The concept of specialty coffee is a bias for
> >>the best that leads to a rewarding partnership between people at
> >>origin and destination and a beverage of outstanding cup quality.
>
> >>Donald Schoenholt
> >>aka: i840coffee
> > I love that Donald. Congratulations on your award-to-be. You have
> > always been at the top of Gran Cru Coffee! Enjoy your night:).
>
> > aloha,
> > Cea- Hide quoted text -
>
> - Show quoted text -




  
Date: 27 Apr 2007 22:46:56
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On 27 Apr 2007 12:00:21 -0700, shane <shane.olson@juno.com > wrote:

>I have noticed a similar thing, that for a large number of people,
>"coffee" is Folger's, Maxwell house etc. "special or fancy coffee"
>is what is sold at Starbucks and similar shops. During my coffee
>progression I recall, briefly, liking flavored coffee. Why? It was
>more pleasant to drink than Folger's and I had not learned that
>Specialty grade coffee existed. Most people seem content with
>drinking lesser quality coffee.
>
>One thought does occur to me, if Specialty Coffee only comprises 10%
>of the annual coffee crop, someone needs to drink the other 90%.
>
>Shane

The "official" saying in the coffee world is "Every coffee has its
market."

Marshall


   
Date: 27 Apr 2007 22:57:23
From: jim schulman
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On Fri, 27 Apr 2007 22:46:56 GMT, Marshall
<mrfuss@ihatespamearthlink.net > wrote:

>The "official" saying in the coffee world is "Every coffee has its
>market."

As in, if you pay me $0.30 per pound, I'll take that coffee to the
dump for you.


 
Date: 27 Apr 2007 06:25:45
From:
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
On 26 Apr 2007 23:13:58 -0700, i840coffee@optonline.net wrote:

>Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
>concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
>coffee?"
>
>Specialty coffee is a vision that recognizes ideas of uncompromising
>quality, freshness and care from the farm hand to those who prepare
>and serve the beverage. The concept of specialty coffee is a bias for
>the best that leads to a rewarding partnership between people at
>origin and destination and a beverage of outstanding cup quality.
>
>Donald Schoenholt
>aka: i840coffee
I love that Donald. Congratulations on your award-to-be. You have
always been at the top of Gran Cru Coffee! Enjoy your night:).

aloha,
Cea


  
Date: 27 Apr 2007 17:56:32
From: Robert Harmon
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
I'm late to this thread, but had to toss this in.

I invited everyone from my neighborhood to come by & enjoy some "specialty
coffee" I'd just roasted & blended (I also invited them to bring their home
espresso & coffee machines along to do some side-by-side comparisons -
another tale for another time.)

I had ~50 people show up & we had a great time trying SO's & blends I'd
roasted last week. The funny thing was that almost everyone not in my circle
of coffee fanatic friends thought they were going to be served 'French
vanilla, 'hazelnut', etc., flavored coffee. One couple even left when they
found all I was serving was 'plain coffee'.

So I guess specialty coffee has many meanings, but to the typical person out
there it means something entirely different than it does to us. The coffee
industry could help out with some informational ads in different media, but
I doubt they'd go for that. If folks are happily buying the junk put out by
Folger's, Maxwell House, etc., why tell them otherwise.

So we'll continue to exist outside the mainstream of the coffee world;
different perceptions, definitions, & standards. But, we'll have great
coffee to console us.
--
Robert (Gig 'em!) Harmon
www.tinyurl.com/mb4uj - My coffee pages
www.tinyurl.com/2tnv87 - Guidelines for newbies.
www.tinyurl.com/37gwfr - I may have stuff available for sale here.
<beans@smithfarms.com > wrote in message
news:ab84335mrteof0nvh067gt8sd0usttf0tp@4ax.com...
> On 26 Apr 2007 23:13:58 -0700, i840coffee@optonline.net wrote:
>
>>Shane has posted an important question, "How does one define the
>>concept of specialty coffee to someone who knows nothing about
>>coffee?"
>>
>>Specialty coffee is a vision that recognizes ideas of uncompromising
>>quality, freshness and care from the farm hand to those who prepare
>>and serve the beverage. The concept of specialty coffee is a bias for
>>the best that leads to a rewarding partnership between people at
>>origin and destination and a beverage of outstanding cup quality.
>>
>>Donald Schoenholt
>>aka: i840coffee
> I love that Donald. Congratulations on your award-to-be. You have
> always been at the top of Gran Cru Coffee! Enjoy your night:).
>
> aloha,
> Cea




   
Date: 27 Apr 2007 22:33:09
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Specialty Coffee Definition
I have a very similar story. A friend up the road who use to work as a
distributor in the coffee business shared his love of good coffee with
me. I roasted him a batch of my house blend, back when I was still
using the Hearthware Precision. It was a blend of Colombian, Sumatran
(about 5 years ago when it was quite nice), and Yemen (some old stock
that was amazingly chocolaty). He said it was the best coffee he had
ever tasted, and I discussed with him the importance of starting with
quality beans, roasted properly, and served while still fresh... the
usual stuff as we all know. After that he continued to purchase his
favorite "Midnight Roast" from his usual source. The nearly blackened
beans that smelled like the name implied and tasted pretty much the
same as well.

So like you, I try to educate and try to share my limited knowledge
about coffee and take every chance I get to allow folks to experience
good, fresh coffee, but like the horse and the water, you can't MAKE
them drink.

Randy "half past one AM roast" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com





"Robert Harmon" <r_h_harmon@Zhotmail.com > wrote:
>
>I'm late to this thread, but had to toss this in.
>
>I invited everyone from my neighborhood to come by & enjoy some "specialty
>coffee" I'd just roasted & blended (I also invited them to bring their home
>espresso & coffee machines along to do some side-by-side comparisons -
>another tale for another time.)
>
>I had ~50 people show up & we had a great time trying SO's & blends I'd
>roasted last week. The funny thing was that almost everyone not in my circle
>of coffee fanatic friends thought they were going to be served 'French
>vanilla, 'hazelnut', etc., flavored coffee. One couple even left when they
>found all I was serving was 'plain coffee'.
>
>So I guess specialty coffee has many meanings, but to the typical person out
>there it means something entirely different than it does to us. The coffee
>industry could help out with some informational ads in different media, but
>I doubt they'd go for that. If folks are happily buying the junk put out by
>Folger's, Maxwell House, etc., why tell them otherwise.
>
>So we'll continue to exist outside the mainstream of the coffee world;
>different perceptions, definitions, & standards. But, we'll have great
>coffee to console us.