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Date: 11 Nov 2006 00:20:37
From: Andy Schecter
Subject: Spectacular coffee photos
You gotta see these, spectacular pics of milk dripping to coffee:

http://www.pbase.com/daria90/milk_meets_coffee_splashes
--


-Andy S.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andy_s/sets/




 
Date: 14 Dec 2006 21:05:45
From: CoffeeKid
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos

Andy Schecter wrote:
> You gotta see these, spectacular pics of milk dripping to coffee:
>
> http://www.pbase.com/daria90/milk_meets_coffee_splashes

MakeZine to the rescue:

http://www.makezine.com/flashkit/

Build it, or buy it. I'll probably buy it ;)

k



  
Date: 15 Dec 2006 08:50:31
From: Andy Schecter
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
CoffeeKid wrote:
> MakeZine to the rescue:
>
> http://www.makezine.com/flashkit/

Cool, thanks, k.

--


-Andy S.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andy_s/sets/


 
Date: 13 Nov 2006 18:32:07
From: CoffeeKid
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos

Sheldon T. Hall - DO NOT MAIL wrote:

> To paraphrase Julia Child's famous quote about the food at Chez
> Panisse ... "That's not photography, that's shopping." Given an
> unlimited budget for equipment and supplies, anyone can shoot some
> kinds of stuff.
>
> But it's like espresso production, innit? You can buy the perfect
> equipment, and produce the perfect drink ... until conditions change.
> Then, unless you understand the process, you're SOL.

Amen to that.

k



 
Date: 11 Nov 2006 05:36:03
From: dcrehr
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
I don't know whether this is available on VHS or DVD or not. A cursory
search of Amazon does not show it.

Edgerton and His Incredible Seeing Machines
NOVA explores the fascinating world of Dr. Harold Edgerton, electronics
wizard and inventor extraordinaire, whose invention of the electronic
strobe, a "magic lamp," has enabled the human eye to see the unseen.
Original broadcast date: 01/15/85
Topic: biography


cpl593h wrote:
> I wish I could find that video somewhere. I'm sure I'd appreciate it
> more now.
>
> > Edgerton. Still the best.
> >
> > shall



 
Date: 11 Nov 2006 03:19:13
From: ramboorider@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
I can't believe this wasn't retouched in photoshop - has gotta be one
of the more obscene photo's I've seen on the internet:

http://www.pbase.com/daria90/image/61232020

-Ray



 
Date: 11 Nov 2006 00:44:07
From: cpl593h
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
I wish I could find that video somewhere. I'm sure I'd appreciate it
more now.

> Edgerton. Still the best.
>
> shall



 
Date: 10 Nov 2006 19:17:54
From: cpl593h
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
I remember seeing a video in middle school about a strobographic
photographer. He produced the well known bullet-through-the-apple and
other such photos. He used some kind of audio triggering to time his
shots. Maybe she does a similar thing and mics the coffee.



  
Date: 11 Nov 2006 05:32:50
From: Marshall
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On 10 Nov 2006 19:17:54 -0800, "cpl593h" <CPL593H@gmail.com > wrote:

>I remember seeing a video in middle school about a strobographic
>photographer. He produced the well known bullet-through-the-apple and
>other such photos. He used some kind of audio triggering to time his
>shots.

Edgerton. Still the best.

shall


  
Date: 11 Nov 2006 04:06:37
From: Andy Schecter
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
cpl593h wrote:
> Maybe she does a similar thing and mics the coffee.

She says she doesn't, relying instead on luck, repetition, and a steady
shutter finger.


--


-Andy S.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andy_s/sets/


   
Date: 11 Nov 2006 11:54:56
From: Nobody Important
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
Andy Schecter wrote:
> cpl593h wrote:
>> Maybe she does a similar thing and mics the coffee.
>
> She says she doesn't, relying instead on luck, repetition, and a steady
> shutter finger.

She also relies on a $4000 Nikon D2X which takes a shot every 1/8 of a
second in continuous shooting mode. :-)


    
Date: 12 Nov 2006 07:15:17
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 11:54:56 -0500, Nobody Important
<Dr.Xenon1@gmail.NOSPAM.com > wrote:

>She also relies on a $4000 Nikon D2X which takes a shot every 1/8 of a
>second in continuous shooting mode. :-)

one can miss "the moment" at 1/8th on continuous shoot (is that the
new term for autodrive?). i used to shoot sports with guys who'd just
let the nikons crank on autodrive, and they rarely captured "the
moment".


--barry "one shot, one kill. or something like that."



     
Date: 12 Nov 2006 18:56:58
From: Sheldon T. Hall - DO NOT MAIL
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 07:15:17 GMT, Barry Jarrett
<barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:

>one can miss "the moment" at 1/8th on continuous shoot (is that the
>new term for autodrive?). i used to shoot sports with guys who'd just
>let the nikons crank on autodrive, and they rarely captured "the
>moment".
>
>--barry "one shot, one kill. or something like that."

Or "One Riot, One Ranger."

Long ago, when Tri-X was King, I was a sometimes news photographer. I
started at the bottom of the stringer list for UPI, but when the real
guys were tied up, they would call me in, hand me a brick of film and
a press pass, and send me to a Braves game or something.

I had a motor drive and all that, but I hardly used it for anything
escept saving wear on my thumb. I just anticipated the action, and
tried to hit it right.

I'd come back after the game with a roll or two of exposed film,
rather than the 18 or 20 they expected. The first time I did that, I
thought the photo editor was going to have an infarction. I had a
couple of decent shots on there, though. After the second time I did
it, they started calling me more often.

Among the all-time greatest "one shot, one kill" pictures was one of
the two Pulitzer prizes won by amateur photographers. In 1947, Arnold
Hardy, an amateur photographer in Atlanta, heard fire sirens downtown,
picked up his 4x5 camera and his last film pack, went to the scene of
the Winecoff Hotel fire, and snapped one picture of woman leaping from
the building. You don't get second shots under those circumstances.

Another famous one-sie is Ansel Adams "Moonrise, Hernandez, New
Mexico." He only had time to stop the car, set up his view camera on
the roof, eyeball the exposure, and snap the shutter once. The town
wasn't moving, but the light was.

-Shel




      
Date: 13 Nov 2006 04:12:57
From: Barry Jarrett
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 18:56:58 -0800, Sheldon T. Hall - DO NOT MAIL
<aquaman@tandem.artell.net > wrote:

>I had a motor drive and all that, but I hardly used it for anything
>escept saving wear on my thumb. I just anticipated the action, and
>tried to hit it right.
>

i was set up next to a couple of sports illustrated photogs during the
1980 olympic speedskating qualifying trials. i managed to get some
excellent shots of eric heiden, et al, with my modest equipment. my
hands were a lot colder than the SI guys, though, as they were using
tripod mounted motor driven cameras (canons, iirc) equipped with
garage door remote controls, with one camera aimed at each lane of the
rink. i'd take my shot or two each lap, while these guys would crank
off about a dozen frames on each camera on each lap, w/o looking
through the lens and w/o removing their hands from their coat pockets.

when i was in a photography class in college, i actually got
downgraded because i would only shoot three or four frames for an
assignment instead of the roll or two the instructors wanted. my
argument that i "got the shot" was apparently insufficient... i'd get
the grade on the image, but they always tweaked me on "effort".


--barry "now i 'get the shot', but it's espresso!"





       
Date: 13 Nov 2006 00:52:46
From: Sheldon T. Hall - DO NOT MAIL
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On Mon, 13 Nov 2006 04:12:57 GMT, Barry Jarrett
<barry@rileys-coffee.com > wrote:

>On Sun, 12 Nov 2006 18:56:58 -0800, Sheldon T. Hall - DO NOT MAIL
><aquaman@tandem.artell.net> wrote:
>
> >I had a motor drive and all that, but I hardly used it for anything
> >escept saving wear on my thumb. I just anticipated the action, and
> >tried to hit it right.
> >
>
>i was set up next to a couple of sports illustrated photogs during the
>1980 olympic speedskating qualifying trials. i managed to get some
>excellent shots of eric heiden, et al, with my modest equipment. my
>hands were a lot colder than the SI guys, though, as they were using
>tripod mounted motor driven cameras (canons, iirc) equipped with
>garage door remote controls, with one camera aimed at each lane of the
>rink. i'd take my shot or two each lap, while these guys would crank
>off about a dozen frames on each camera on each lap, w/o looking
>through the lens and w/o removing their hands from their coat pockets.

To paraphrase Julia Child's famous quote about the food at Chez
Panisse ... "That's not photography, that's shopping." Given an
unlimited budget for equipment and supplies, anyone can shoot some
kinds of stuff.

But it's like espresso production, innit? You can buy the perfect
equipment, and produce the perfect drink ... until conditions change.
Then, unless you understand the process, you're SOL.

-Shel



     
Date: 12 Nov 2006 17:31:26
From: Mathew Hargreaves
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
There are several factors that are probably influencing the shots.
Speed of the shot for one. However, what are the tempretures of the two
liquids to keep them from blending. That bounce effect means the milk
drops were from a decent hight, when most milk is mildly poured in.
Also, was it milk or a thicker cream, or a substitute? If it was all
done manually, she went through a lot of coffee to get the shots. Hmmm,
was it Folgier's or fresh ground beans?
The contrast of the colors do help to enlighten the fun of the
pictures.

CHEERS...Matt

Barry Jarrett wrote:
>
> On Sat, 11 Nov 2006 11:54:56 -0500, Nobody Important
> <Dr.Xenon1@gmail.NOSPAM.com> wrote:
>
> >She also relies on a $4000 Nikon D2X which takes a shot every 1/8 of a
> >second in continuous shooting mode. :-)
>
> one can miss "the moment" at 1/8th on continuous shoot (is that the
> new term for autodrive?). i used to shoot sports with guys who'd just
> let the nikons crank on autodrive, and they rarely captured "the
> moment".
>
> --barry "one shot, one kill. or something like that."


  
Date: 11 Nov 2006 03:44:45
From: I->Ian
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On 10 Nov 2006 19:17:54 -0800, "cpl593h" <CPL593H@gmail.com > wrote:

>I remember seeing a video in middle school about a strobographic
>photographer. He produced the well known bullet-through-the-apple and
>other such photos. He used some kind of audio triggering to time his
>shots. Maybe she does a similar thing and mics the coffee.

Right you are.

IIRC its the late 40's book "Strobe - The Lively Light".

Probably uses a IR beam to trigger the flash with the shutter open.


   
Date: 10 Nov 2006 22:54:05
From: notbob
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On 2006-11-11, I- >Ian <someone@nowhere.com> wrote:

> IIRC its the late 40's book "Strobe - The Lively Light".

Some guy (one of Disney's early cine pioneers, I think) pioneered all
this liquid drop stuff way back in the 30s or 40s. He discovered all
liquids have a signature splash pattern just like fingerprints. It's
old news and has been photographed and studied to death by physicists
for decades. But, some young photog comes along and rediscovers it
every few years. Fifteen minutes and all that. Hey, it looks cool
and we gotta expose the youngsters, donchya know. ;)

nb


    
Date: 11 Nov 2006 09:10:01
From: notbob
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
On 2006-11-11, notbob <notbob@nothome.com > wrote:

> Some guy (one of Disney's early cine pioneers, I think) pioneered all

OK, I'm off base on this one. Probably just my ancient memory being
taxed beyond its abilities. I do know the first time I ever saw
splash photography was on the Disneyland (Wonderful World of Disney)
tv show as a wee little tyke. In between Davy Crockett and Annette
Funicello, Walt was always wedging in fascinating educational programs
on photography and cinemattography and lighting, etc. I suspect now
it was Edgerton I saw profiled on that program. Here's one website on
the history of splash photography:

http://courses.ncssm.edu/hsi/splashes/history.htm

nb


 
Date: 10 Nov 2006 18:43:21
From: CoffeeKid
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos

razmoo wrote:
> I guess that guy likes a DROP of milk in his coffee.

I think it's a woman.

I saw these photos last year... I was trying to dissect how she did
them. She gave a brief explanation, but IIRC, she didn't come in and
answer further questions in the comments that people had about it.
Maybe I'm overthinking it, but I'm guessing she's firing strobes at
high speed (1/4000th a second; I think she used a rebel digital, and
that's the camera's top speed).

I got a bit obsessive about them and tried a whole range of shooting
espresso as it brews in stop motion, but since I use cold lights in my
studio (and definitely not enough light to capture anything over
1/500th a second at 400 ISO, and am limited to firing an on board 580EX
flash at 1/8000th a second at only about 0.5, 0.25 fps, it was proving
very difficult to capture this kind of effect.

Really cool photos. I'd like to use the technique to capture the first
"splatter" of espresso hitting an espresso cup.

k



  
Date: 11 Nov 2006 04:07:34
From: Andy Schecter
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
CoffeeKid wrote:
> Really cool photos. I'd like to use the technique to capture the first
> "splatter" of espresso hitting an espresso cup.

Looking forward to viewing your photos!

--


-Andy S.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/andy_s/sets/


 
Date: 10 Nov 2006 16:24:28
From: razmoo
Subject: Re: Spectacular coffee photos
I guess that guy likes a DROP of milk in his coffee.