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Date: 11 Dec 2006 17:06:54
From: Eureka
Subject: The best cup o'joe
I'd like to share a family secret with you. This is the way my grandfather
(1896) and my mother (1913) would prepare the most delicious cup of coffee.
Keep in mind that coffee in those days was the main crop that my grandfather
produced in the family farm high in the mountains of Ciales, Puerto Rico
which was simply known as 'cafe de la montaņa'. This recipe is very easy to
make, yet, many people spoil a good cup of coffee. It's mind-boggling how
some with so little (just a cotton sock) can make the best cup of coffee in
the world yet some with such expensive espresso machines and grinders can
spoil the brew....Is it perhaps because they are starting with the wrong
beans or grind? OK! in a casserole pour 2, 3, 4, or 5 cups of water
(depending on how many cups you are making) and to that, add a little more
water to replace the evaporated loss. Measure 2, 3, 4, or 5 heaping
tablespoons of 'Café Real de Puerto RicoŽ' and set aside; at this time you
should take care to close the coffee bag tightly and put it back in the
refrigerator or freezer. Heat the water to its boiling point. As soon as
the water starts bubbling from the bottom of the casserole add the coffee to
the water and stir to mix well with the water. Lower the heat to low-medium
and allow the coffee to cook in the boiling water not more than 1 minute.
Turn the heat completely off and let the casserole stand on the burner
simmering for another minute to two minutes while you stir the coffee
occasionally. The good thing about this is that you do not need any
expensive fancy urns or coffee makers to make this excellent brew. Now here
comes the good part; you are welcome to use a sock or any cloth, preferably
cotton, to drain or filter the brew right into your cup. I highly recommend
the Puerto Rico style inexpensive 'colador'. The important thing is not to
allow the coffee ground to get into the cup of coffee..... there! Buen
Provecho! Enjoy your coffee and spread the word!

This recipe is extracted from http://www.cafedepr.com/history.htm where you
can get the inexpensive colador and the best coffee beans from the mountains
of Puerto Rico.



--
Disclosure: I have a vested interest in promoting Cafe Real de Puerto Rico
and www.cafedepr.com






 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 11:39:42
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: The best cup o'joe
"Eureka" <noname@verizon.net > wrote:
>
>This recipe is extracted from http://www.xxxxxxxx.com/history.htm where you
>can get the inexpensive colador and the best coffee beans from the mountains
>of Puerto Rico.
>--
>Disclosure: I have a vested interest in promoting Cafe Real de Puerto Rico
>and www.cafedepr.com

- WE FIGURED THAT OUT ABOUT TWO SENTENCES INTO YOUR "STORY."

GO AWAY. STAY AWAY.

Randy "Addy-Ohs" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com




  
Date: 11 Dec 2006 13:20:00
From:
Subject: Re: The best cup o'joe
On Mon, 11 Dec 2006 11:39:42 -0800, Randy G. <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com >
wrote:

>GO AWAY. STAY AWAY.
>
> Randy "Addy-Ohs" G.
>http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>
>

Randy intensely dislikes it when anyone other than himself starts
shilling product here.







_______________________________________
Please Note: If you find a posting or message from me
offensive, inappropriate, or disruptive, please ignore it.
If you don't know how to ignore a posting, complain to
me and I will be only too happy to demonstrate.


 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 13:33:34
From: Jack Denver
Subject: Re: The best cup o'joe

"Eureka" <noname@verizon.net > wrote in message
news:Oegfh.8125$Q36.1341@trnddc08...
> I'd like to share a family secret with you.

I guess you are not very good at keeping secrets if you post them on the
internet.

This is the way my grandfather
> (1896) and my mother (1913)

This is a strange custom. Is it some kind of latino thing? My parents and
grandparents had names and would have been insulted if you called them by
number. "1913, can you ask 1896 to pass the salt?"

would prepare the most delicious cup of coffee.
> Keep in mind that coffee in those days was the main crop that my
> grandfather produced in the family farm high in the mountains of Ciales,
> Puerto Rico which was simply known as 'cafe de la montaņa'.

This was in the days before Puerto Rico was taken over by big pharma. Now
they have pulled up all the coffee trees and planted genetically engineered
crops that produce erectile dysfunction drugs.

This recipe is very easy to
> make, yet, many people spoil a good cup of coffee. It's mind-boggling how
> some with so little (just a cotton sock) can make the best cup of coffee
> in the world yet some with such expensive espresso machines and grinders
> can spoil the brew

I have tried making coffee with just a cotton sock but it always runs right
through it onto the ground. I've burned myself that way also. Also, I find
that I do need a grinder - the little coffee that I've been able to catch in
my palms was very weak when I didn't use a grinder.



....Is it perhaps because they are starting with the wrong
> beans or grind? OK! in a casserole pour 2, 3, 4, or 5 cups of water
> (depending on how many cups you are making) and to that, add a little more
> water to replace the evaporated loss. Measure 2, 3, 4, or 5 heaping
> tablespoons of 'Café Real de Puerto RicoŽ' and set aside;

Maybe that was my mistake. I just used home roasted Sumatra coffee. Maybe
if I have used Cafe Real de Puerto Rico registered tradek it would have
worked better.



at this time you
> should take care to close the coffee bag tightly and put it back in the
> refrigerator or freezer. Heat the water to its boiling point. As soon as
> the water starts bubbling from the bottom of the casserole add the coffee
> to the water and stir to mix well with the water. Lower the heat to
> low-medium and allow the coffee to cook in the boiling water not more than
> 1 minute. Turn the heat completely off and let the casserole stand on the
> burner simmering for another minute to two minutes while you stir the
> coffee occasionally. The good thing about this is that you do not need
> any expensive fancy urns or coffee makers to make this excellent brew.
> Now here comes the good part; you are welcome to use a sock or any cloth,
> preferably cotton,

Preferably a really clean one I hope.


to drain or filter the brew right into your cup. I highly recommend
> the Puerto Rico style inexpensive 'colador'. The important thing is not
> to allow the coffee ground to get into the cup of coffee..... there! Buen
> Provecho! Enjoy your coffee and spread the word!
>
> This recipe is extracted from http://www.cafedepr.com/history.htm where
> you can get the inexpensive colador and the best coffee beans from the
> mountains of Puerto Rico.
>
>
>
> --
> Disclosure: I have a vested interest in promoting Cafe Real de Puerto
> Rico and www.cafedepr.com


I would not have guessed.
>
>




 
Date: 11 Dec 2006 10:05:07
From:
Subject: Re: The best cup o'joe

Eureka wrote:
> I'd like to share a family secret with you. This is the way my grandfath=
er
> (1896) and my mother (1913) would prepare the most delicious cup of coffe=
e=2E
> Keep in mind that coffee in those days was the main crop that my grandfat=
her
> produced in the family farm high in the mountains of Ciales, Puerto Rico
> which was simply known as 'cafe de la monta=F1a'. This recipe is very ea=
sy to
> make, yet, many people spoil a good cup of coffee. It's mind-boggling how
> some with so little (just a cotton sock) can make the best cup of coffee =
in
> the world yet some with such expensive espresso machines and grinders can
> spoil the brew....Is it perhaps because they are starting with the wrong
> beans or grind? OK! in a casserole pour 2, 3, 4, or 5 cups of water
> (depending on how many cups you are making) and to that, add a little more
> water to replace the evaporated loss. Measure 2, 3, 4, or 5 heaping
> tablespoons of 'Caf=E9 Real de Puerto Rico=AE' and set aside; at this tim=
e you
> should take care to close the coffee bag tightly and put it back in the
> refrigerator or freezer. Heat the water to its boiling point. As soon as
> the water starts bubbling from the bottom of the casserole add the coffee=
to
> the water and stir to mix well with the water. Lower the heat to low-med=
ium
> and allow the coffee to cook in the boiling water not more than 1 minute.
> Turn the heat completely off and let the casserole stand on the burner
> simmering for another minute to two minutes while you stir the coffee
> occasionally. The good thing about this is that you do not need any
> expensive fancy urns or coffee makers to make this excellent brew. Now h=
ere
> comes the good part; you are welcome to use a sock or any cloth, preferab=
ly
> cotton, to drain or filter the brew right into your cup. I highly recomm=
end
> the Puerto Rico style inexpensive 'colador'. The important thing is not =
to
> allow the coffee ground to get into the cup of coffee..... there! Buen
> Provecho! Enjoy your coffee and spread the word!
>
> This recipe is extracted from http://www.cafedepr.com/history.htm where y=
ou
> can get the inexpensive colador and the best coffee beans from the mounta=
ins
> of Puerto Rico.
>
>
>
> --
> Disclosure: I have a vested interest in promoting Cafe Real de Puerto Ri=
co
> and www.cafedepr.com

Uhm, yeah. Thanks for the cut-and-paste: http://tinyurl.com/yzuhac -
That is even before I point out that this 'recipe' is totally useless.
When people here talk about temperature to the .1F and time to the
second (at least), what am I supposed to do with 'a minute or two' or
'2, 3, 4, or 5 heaping tablespoons'? How many grams in a heaping
tablespoon? I don't plan on putting coffee in a sock 'in the
refrigerator or freezer' or 'allow the coffee to cook in the boiling
water' anytime soon, especially on the say-so of some New Jersey
spammer.

If I could find a reliable source for PR coffee, I might try it. It's
really weird that I can get beans that road a donkey through a war zone
thousands of miles away but can't get beans from within my own country.
How is it that the horn of Africa is more dependable than a territory
of the United States? I have heard rumors that the real problem is
reliable labor, can anyone else comment?

Why did I bother feeding this troll? I have absolutely no idea. NEXT!

Matthew

BTW, where can I get a =AE keycap for my model M?