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Date: 28 Nov 2006 09:22:55
From: DK
Subject: Traveling coffee?
I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble a
traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.

At home, I make Americano with an Aeropress, a Capresso grinder, and freshly
locally-roasted beans. It's so good, I've stopped making espresso with my
old Olympia Cremina.

(The Aeropress is brilliant. I think it's innovation is the ability to
precisely control how much water goes through the beans, and how much goes
directly into the cup.)

As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and spoon.
But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater is
too slow.

Does anyone have a cool solution to this?






 
Date: 02 Dec 2006 12:59:04
From: dcrehr
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
Most hotel rooms have an in-room coffeemaker these days. I travel with
beans, a whirlyblade grinder and Mr. Coffee type filters. I can usually
make these work with the hotel coffeemaker.

On a trip this week, though, the coffeemaker had a wierd pre-packaged
one-time-use packet of coffee with its own plastic filter holder. I had
to practically stand on my head to make it work with my stuff without
overflowing, but I figured it out. I would have bought a mini-dripper
for $9.99 had I seen one.

DR


DK wrote:
> I like the way you think, Larry. Out of the box.
> Your solution won't work for me cause the trips are frequently short and I
> don't usually have wheels or time to find a machine locally, but thanks for
> your input.
>
> "pltrgyst" <pltrgyst@spamlessxhost.org> wrote in message
> news:7gbrm2pl3int0c30onotuv6k1vtb2a2sbh@4ax.com...
> > On Tue, 28 Nov 2006 09:22:55 -0500, "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net> wrote:
> >
> >>As for coffee on the road....
> >
> > When we're travelling and staying in a hotel for more than one or two
> > nights, we
> > simply buy an electric drip machine in the local drugstore for $9.99 or
> > so. We
> > buy ground local beans, and leave the coffee maker behind when we depart.
> >
> > We must buy at least fifteen machines a year. Kinda like bookcrossing.com
> > for
> > cheap drip machines. 8;)
> >
> > -- Larry



 
Date: 02 Dec 2006 06:51:07
From: Omniryx@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I just dug out my old immersion heater and stuck it in 500ml of tap
water. I had a full rolling boil in less than two minutes.

Maybe some additional shopping is indicated.




DK wrote:
> If it were 90 seconds or even 5 minutes, it wouldn't be an issue. For my mug
> with the immersion heater I found, it was more like 20 minutes.
> Anyway, I have to have my first sip before I shower!
>
> <Omniryx@gmail.com> wrote in message
> news:1164813775.375832.93710@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> >
> > DK wrote:
> >> An immersion heater is
> >> too slow.
> >>
> >> Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
> >
> > Yes. Reorganize your life so that 90 seconds waiting for an immersion
> > heater to boil a cup of water isn't "too slow."
> >
> > Seriously, man, plug it in while you shower or shave or put on your
> > shoes.
> >
> > Too slow, indeed!
> >



  
Date: 02 Dec 2006 09:58:38
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
Thank you for taking the time to test that.
I will look for a better immersion heater.

<Omniryx@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1165071067.826571.271870@79g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
>I just dug out my old immersion heater and stuck it in 500ml of tap
> water. I had a full rolling boil in less than two minutes.
>
> Maybe some additional shopping is indicated.
>
>
>
>
> DK wrote:
>> If it were 90 seconds or even 5 minutes, it wouldn't be an issue. For my
>> mug
>> with the immersion heater I found, it was more like 20 minutes.
>> Anyway, I have to have my first sip before I shower!
>>
>> <Omniryx@gmail.com> wrote in message
>> news:1164813775.375832.93710@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>> >
>> > DK wrote:
>> >> An immersion heater is
>> >> too slow.
>> >>
>> >> Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>> >
>> > Yes. Reorganize your life so that 90 seconds waiting for an immersion
>> > heater to boil a cup of water isn't "too slow."
>> >
>> > Seriously, man, plug it in while you shower or shave or put on your
>> > shoes.
>> >
>> > Too slow, indeed!
>> >
>




 
Date: 29 Nov 2006 19:29:11
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
Steve Ackman wrote:
> rasqual wrote:
> > mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:

> > > http://tinyurl.com/bb4o2
> > http://rasqual.home.mindspring.com/can/hyperlite.htm
> http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html

Tres cool!



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 19:56:43
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I've seen these amazing little stoves. Great for camping, but I'm flying a
lot and staying IN hotels... Thanks!

"rasqual" <scott.quardt@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1164857350.937105.88100@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
> Steve Ackman wrote:
>> rasqual wrote:
>> > mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
>
>> > > http://tinyurl.com/bb4o2
>> > http://rasqual.home.mindspring.com/can/hyperlite.htm
>> http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html
>
> Tres cool!
>




 
Date: 29 Nov 2006 11:01:24
From: pltrgyst
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
On Tue, 28 Nov 2006 09:22:55 -0500, "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net > wrote:

>As for coffee on the road....

When we're travelling and staying in a hotel for more than one or two nights, we
simply buy an electric drip machine in the local drugstore for $9.99 or so. We
buy ground local beans, and leave the coffee maker behind when we depart.

We must buy at least fifteen machines a year. Kinda like bookcrossing.com for
cheap drip machines. 8;)

-- Larry


  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 20:20:31
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I like the way you think, Larry. Out of the box.
Your solution won't work for me cause the trips are frequently short and I
don't usually have wheels or time to find a machine locally, but thanks for
your input.

"pltrgyst" <pltrgyst@spamlessxhost.org > wrote in message
news:7gbrm2pl3int0c30onotuv6k1vtb2a2sbh@4ax.com...
> On Tue, 28 Nov 2006 09:22:55 -0500, "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net> wrote:
>
>>As for coffee on the road....
>
> When we're travelling and staying in a hotel for more than one or two
> nights, we
> simply buy an electric drip machine in the local drugstore for $9.99 or
> so. We
> buy ground local beans, and leave the coffee maker behind when we depart.
>
> We must buy at least fifteen machines a year. Kinda like bookcrossing.com
> for
> cheap drip machines. 8;)
>
> -- Larry




 
Date: 29 Nov 2006 07:22:55
From: Omniryx@gmail.com
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?

DK wrote:
> An immersion heater is
> too slow.
>
> Does anyone have a cool solution to this?

Yes. Reorganize your life so that 90 seconds waiting for an immersion
heater to boil a cup of water isn't "too slow."

Seriously, man, plug it in while you shower or shave or put on your
shoes.

Too slow, indeed!



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 20:17:57
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
If it were 90 seconds or even 5 minutes, it wouldn't be an issue. For my mug
with the immersion heater I found, it was more like 20 minutes.
Anyway, I have to have my first sip before I shower!

<Omniryx@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1164813775.375832.93710@j44g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...
>
> DK wrote:
>> An immersion heater is
>> too slow.
>>
>> Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>
> Yes. Reorganize your life so that 90 seconds waiting for an immersion
> heater to boil a cup of water isn't "too slow."
>
> Seriously, man, plug it in while you shower or shave or put on your
> shoes.
>
> Too slow, indeed!
>




 
Date: 29 Nov 2006 04:28:08
From: CrackAddict
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?

DK wrote:
> I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble a
> traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.

What do you mean by travel?

I've gone on safari for months and pondered the same questions, but
then I have a Land Rover and lots of space. I can't see why an
immersion heater is too slow - even a 110V model heats up a mug of
water in a few minutes. The next step up is an electric kettle, which
uses exactly the same parts but in a better package - can't be much
faster.

Beyond that, how exactly can one heat water "on the road"? I doubt you
are taking your MSR/Peak1 backpack stove on an airplane (no fuel at
least) but it would be fine in a car. That would be quicker but messy,
bulky and possibly dangerous if used indoors.

In the rest-of-the-world, many hotels have electric kettles in the room
- a device yet to be embraced in the US (but common in Canada). So you
can boil a whole quart on the house. You could also carry a thermos and
just ask for hot water in the kitchen (we used this technique
travelling in Paraguay to keep our mate topped up).

I'm an espresso drinker but I personally find the best compromise is to
carry a small one-cup plastic plunge pot and rely on the kindness of
strangers for my hot water. Travel for me could be living out of bag
for a month and at least with the plunge pot, I can usually make
drinkable coffee with locally-procured grind.



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 20:15:13
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I'm a musician. I tour with a major headlining act all over the world. So,
it's commercial airlines, and nice hotels. Trips are once or twice a month
and usually 3-10 days but occasionally we'll go out for 2 weeks or so.

The immersion heater I tried was really slow boiling my mug of water and
added a bad taste (which I imagine would go away after a few uses).

I've seen electric kettles in hotels occasionally, but you never know so
the point of this would be to be in my standard packing list so I'm set
regardless.

So far I'm thinking Aeropress, filters, mug, spoon, coffee, sugar, and Bodum
Mini-Ibis. And power converter for overseas. Still sounds like a bit much,
doesn't it?

"CrackAddict" <smppix@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1164803288.131442.293320@l39g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...
>
> DK wrote:
>> I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble a
>> traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.
>
> What do you mean by travel?
>
> I've gone on safari for months and pondered the same questions, but
> then I have a Land Rover and lots of space. I can't see why an
> immersion heater is too slow - even a 110V model heats up a mug of
> water in a few minutes. The next step up is an electric kettle, which
> uses exactly the same parts but in a better package - can't be much
> faster.
>
> Beyond that, how exactly can one heat water "on the road"? I doubt you
> are taking your MSR/Peak1 backpack stove on an airplane (no fuel at
> least) but it would be fine in a car. That would be quicker but messy,
> bulky and possibly dangerous if used indoors.
>
> In the rest-of-the-world, many hotels have electric kettles in the room
> - a device yet to be embraced in the US (but common in Canada). So you
> can boil a whole quart on the house. You could also carry a thermos and
> just ask for hot water in the kitchen (we used this technique
> travelling in Paraguay to keep our mate topped up).
>
> I'm an espresso drinker but I personally find the best compromise is to
> carry a small one-cup plastic plunge pot and rely on the kindness of
> strangers for my hot water. Travel for me could be living out of bag
> for a month and at least with the plunge pot, I can usually make
> drinkable coffee with locally-procured grind.
>




 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 21:34:44
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
DK wrote:

> An immersion heater is too slow.

Really?

I agree that it can't keep up with a 1500 watt boiler, but geez -- it
only saves you a minute and a half, at most. The difference for SIZE is
profound.

- S



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 20:06:36
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I agree that an additional minute and a half is worth the difference in
size, but the immersion heater I got from Bed Bath & Beyond took more than
20 minutes to boil about 15 ounces of water, and it ended up tasting funny
as well. Not good enuf.

"rasqual" <scott.quardt@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1164778484.777069.275400@14g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
> DK wrote:
>
>> An immersion heater is too slow.
>
> Really?
>
> I agree that it can't keep up with a 1500 watt boiler, but geez -- it
> only saves you a minute and a half, at most. The difference for SIZE is
> profound.
>
> - S
>




 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 21:32:44
From: rasqual
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?

mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
> DK wrote:
> > As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
> > filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and spoon.
> > But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
> > the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater is
> > too slow.
> >
> > Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>
> soda can stove? http://tinyurl.com/bb4o2

No, use my design!

http://rasqual.home.mindspring.com/can/hyperlite.htm

;-)



  
Date: 29 Nov 2006 14:20:55
From: Steve Ackman
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
In <1164778364.601132.203860@n67g2000cwd.googlegroups.com >, on 28 Nov
2006 21:32:44 -0800, rasqual wrote:
>
> mandtprice@gmail.com wrote:
>> DK wrote:
>> > As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
>> > filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and spoon.
>> > But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
>> > the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater is
>> > too slow.
>> >
>> > Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>>
>> soda can stove? http://tinyurl.com/bb4o2
>
> No, use my design!
>
> http://rasqual.home.mindspring.com/can/hyperlite.htm
>
> ;-)

... and there's the penny stove:
http://www.csun.edu/~mjurey/penny.html


 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 11:41:38
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I have a second espresso machine in the motorhome, but last trip it
stayed in the under-storage and we just used the Aeropress- faster,
easier, and less mess with easier clean up.

For coffee it depends on how long you are gone at a time. You could
pre-grind and pre-package in individual air-tight containers per use.
That would eliminate the need for a grinder. Alternatively, there are
small hand grinders made for backpacking that would work and store in
a lot less space than any electric grinder.

As far as heating, I didn't find any small electric kettles that
didn't appear to be junk (there are a few small, cheap aluminum
electric mini-pots on eBay), but something tall and narrow (as opposed
to short and fat) might allow you to store the entire coffee kit in
the kettle to save packing space. The flatter size would pack easier
as well. Maybe something like the Bodum mini Ibis ($18 here:
http://www.ekitchengadgets.com, $20 in white at Walt)...


Randy "BTBT" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com



"DK" <davidk88@optonline.net > wrote:

>I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble a
>traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.
>
>At home, I make Americano with an Aeropress, a Capresso grinder, and freshly
>locally-roasted beans. It's so good, I've stopped making espresso with my
>old Olympia Cremina.
>
>(The Aeropress is brilliant. I think it's innovation is the ability to
>precisely control how much water goes through the beans, and how much goes
>directly into the cup.)
>
>As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
>filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and spoon.
>But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
>the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater is
>too slow.
>
>Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>


  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 20:01:08
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I usually go for 3 to 8 days. I'll pre-grind.
I think you're right. Aeropress, coffee, sugar, mug, spoon, and a mini Ibis
may be the most compact solution.
Krups once made a travel set that was pretty neat for a drip machine, but
it's discontinued and I doubt I could get my ex mother-in-law to give me
back the one I gave her as a gift years ago. D'oh!!

"Randy G." <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com > wrote in message
news:ov2pm2hts29a5cs5rr81bnes775iinoerq@4ax.com...
>I have a second espresso machine in the motorhome, but last trip it
> stayed in the under-storage and we just used the Aeropress- faster,
> easier, and less mess with easier clean up.
>
> For coffee it depends on how long you are gone at a time. You could
> pre-grind and pre-package in individual air-tight containers per use.
> That would eliminate the need for a grinder. Alternatively, there are
> small hand grinders made for backpacking that would work and store in
> a lot less space than any electric grinder.
>
> As far as heating, I didn't find any small electric kettles that
> didn't appear to be junk (there are a few small, cheap aluminum
> electric mini-pots on eBay), but something tall and narrow (as opposed
> to short and fat) might allow you to store the entire coffee kit in
> the kettle to save packing space. The flatter size would pack easier
> as well. Maybe something like the Bodum mini Ibis ($18 here:
> http://www.ekitchengadgets.com, $20 in white at Walt)...
>
>
> Randy "BTBT" G.
> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>
>
>
> "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net> wrote:
>
>>I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble a
>>traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.
>>
>>At home, I make Americano with an Aeropress, a Capresso grinder, and
>>freshly
>>locally-roasted beans. It's so good, I've stopped making espresso with my
>>old Olympia Cremina.
>>
>>(The Aeropress is brilliant. I think it's innovation is the ability to
>>precisely control how much water goes through the beans, and how much goes
>>directly into the cup.)
>>
>>As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
>>filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and
>>spoon.
>>But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
>>the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater
>>is
>>too slow.
>>
>>Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>>




   
Date: 02 Dec 2006 22:32:16
From: Randy G.
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
I would look for a resealable container (tupperware-ish) that could
hold the sugar and fit in the Aero's plunger cavity. Come to think of
it, if the plunder had a snap-on cap of its own it would make a nice
storage area without assistance. The coffee could be individually
pre-measured and packed into one zip lock that could store anywhere,
like in the Ibis as I mentioned.

After a while you get good at packing! To improve, play tetris! ;-)

Randy "What's in the kettle, sir?" G.
http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com


"DK" <davidk88@optonline.net > wrote:
>
>I usually go for 3 to 8 days. I'll pre-grind.
>I think you're right. Aeropress, coffee, sugar, mug, spoon, and a mini Ibis
>may be the most compact solution.
>Krups once made a travel set that was pretty neat for a drip machine, but
>it's discontinued and I doubt I could get my ex mother-in-law to give me
>back the one I gave her as a gift years ago. D'oh!!
>
>"Randy G." <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com> wrote in message
>news:ov2pm2hts29a5cs5rr81bnes775iinoerq@4ax.com...
>>I have a second espresso machine in the motorhome, but last trip it
>> stayed in the under-storage and we just used the Aeropress- faster,
>> easier, and less mess with easier clean up.
>>
>> For coffee it depends on how long you are gone at a time. You could
>> pre-grind and pre-package in individual air-tight containers per use.
>> That would eliminate the need for a grinder. Alternatively, there are
>> small hand grinders made for backpacking that would work and store in
>> a lot less space than any electric grinder.
>>
>> As far as heating, I didn't find any small electric kettles that
>> didn't appear to be junk (there are a few small, cheap aluminum
>> electric mini-pots on eBay), but something tall and narrow (as opposed
>> to short and fat) might allow you to store the entire coffee kit in
>> the kettle to save packing space. The flatter size would pack easier
>> as well. Maybe something like the Bodum mini Ibis ($18 here:
>> http://www.ekitchengadgets.com, $20 in white at Walt)...
>>
>>
>> Randy "BTBT" G.
>> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>>
>>
>>
>> "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net> wrote:
>>
>>>I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble a
>>>traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.
>>>
>>>At home, I make Americano with an Aeropress, a Capresso grinder, and
>>>freshly
>>>locally-roasted beans. It's so good, I've stopped making espresso with my
>>>old Olympia Cremina.
>>>
>>>(The Aeropress is brilliant. I think it's innovation is the ability to
>>>precisely control how much water goes through the beans, and how much goes
>>>directly into the cup.)
>>>
>>>As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
>>>filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and
>>>spoon.
>>>But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
>>>the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater
>>>is
>>>too slow.
>>>
>>>Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>>>
>


    
Date: 03 Dec 2006 11:10:42
From: pltrgyst
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
On Sat, 02 Dec 2006 22:32:16 -0800, Randy G. <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com > wrote:

>I would look for a resealable container (tupperware-ish) that could
>hold the sugar and fit in the Aero's plunger cavity. Come to think of
>it, if the plunder had a snap-on cap of its own it would make a nice
>storage area without assistance. The coffee could be individually
>pre-measured and packed into one zip lock that could store anywhere,
>like in the Ibis as I mentioned.

Why not another zip-lock bag for the sugar?

-- Larry


    
Date: 03 Dec 2006 10:42:37
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
That could help consolidate.
Have you seen this?
http://www.zaccardis.com/bodum-travel-coffee-press.html


"Randy G." <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com > wrote in message
news:hjr4n218cu6a9c22j619imot1l2o5nnn3g@4ax.com...
>I would look for a resealable container (tupperware-ish) that could
> hold the sugar and fit in the Aero's plunger cavity. Come to think of
> it, if the plunder had a snap-on cap of its own it would make a nice
> storage area without assistance. The coffee could be individually
> pre-measured and packed into one zip lock that could store anywhere,
> like in the Ibis as I mentioned.
>
> After a while you get good at packing! To improve, play tetris! ;-)
>
> Randy "What's in the kettle, sir?" G.
> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>
>
> "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net> wrote:
>>
>>I usually go for 3 to 8 days. I'll pre-grind.
>>I think you're right. Aeropress, coffee, sugar, mug, spoon, and a mini
>>Ibis
>>may be the most compact solution.
>>Krups once made a travel set that was pretty neat for a drip machine, but
>>it's discontinued and I doubt I could get my ex mother-in-law to give me
>>back the one I gave her as a gift years ago. D'oh!!
>>
>>"Randy G." <frcn@DESPAMMOcncnet.com> wrote in message
>>news:ov2pm2hts29a5cs5rr81bnes775iinoerq@4ax.com...
>>>I have a second espresso machine in the motorhome, but last trip it
>>> stayed in the under-storage and we just used the Aeropress- faster,
>>> easier, and less mess with easier clean up.
>>>
>>> For coffee it depends on how long you are gone at a time. You could
>>> pre-grind and pre-package in individual air-tight containers per use.
>>> That would eliminate the need for a grinder. Alternatively, there are
>>> small hand grinders made for backpacking that would work and store in
>>> a lot less space than any electric grinder.
>>>
>>> As far as heating, I didn't find any small electric kettles that
>>> didn't appear to be junk (there are a few small, cheap aluminum
>>> electric mini-pots on eBay), but something tall and narrow (as opposed
>>> to short and fat) might allow you to store the entire coffee kit in
>>> the kettle to save packing space. The flatter size would pack easier
>>> as well. Maybe something like the Bodum mini Ibis ($18 here:
>>> http://www.ekitchengadgets.com, $20 in white at Walt)...
>>>
>>>
>>> Randy "BTBT" G.
>>> http://www.EspressoMyEspresso.com
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> "DK" <davidk88@optonline.net> wrote:
>>>
>>>>I've been traveling more regularly lately, and I would like to assemble
>>>>a
>>>>traveling coffee kit that's as compact as possible.
>>>>
>>>>At home, I make Americano with an Aeropress, a Capresso grinder, and
>>>>freshly
>>>>locally-roasted beans. It's so good, I've stopped making espresso with
>>>>my
>>>>old Olympia Cremina.
>>>>
>>>>(The Aeropress is brilliant. I think it's innovation is the ability to
>>>>precisely control how much water goes through the beans, and how much
>>>>goes
>>>>directly into the cup.)
>>>>
>>>>As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
>>>>filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and
>>>>spoon.
>>>>But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work,
>>>>but
>>>>the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater
>>>>is
>>>>too slow.
>>>>
>>>>Does anyone have a cool solution to this?
>>>>
>>




 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 08:13:28
From:
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?

DK wrote:
> As for coffee on the road, I wouldn't mind taking the Aeropress, some
> filters and ground coffee and sugar in ziploc bags, a 12 oz. mug and spoon.
> But I still need a way to heat water. A small Bodum kettle would work, but
> the total package would be bigger than I would like. An immersion heater is
> too slow.
>
> Does anyone have a cool solution to this?

soda can stove? http://tinyurl.com/bb4o2

Couldn't the aeropress, ziplock and spoon go inside the mug and kettle?
If the aeropress as insensitive to water temp as has been reported
maybe you could bring hot water with you in a vac bottle? Pardon the
brain dump

Matthew



 
Date: 28 Nov 2006 08:11:45
From:
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
Wouldn't say that this is a cool solution but one of the more efficient
ones that I've found. The electric moka pot by Bialetti,
http://www.alterracoffee.com/store/detail.aspx?ID=265&CategoryID=35&BaseID=32
.
Personally I've been traveling with my aeropress and hope that the
hotel that I'll be staying in has hot water for tea. Which most do.
Before the aeropress I traveled with a Nissan steel french press.
Hope this helps.
pz



  
Date: 01 Dec 2006 19:53:59
From: DK
Subject: Re: Traveling coffee?
Looks very interesting, but it's discontinued and unavailable. I'll keep an
eye out for one. Thanks!

<philzajicek@gmail.com > wrote in message
news:1164730305.920589.263620@45g2000cws.googlegroups.com...
> Wouldn't say that this is a cool solution but one of the more efficient
> ones that I've found. The electric moka pot by Bialetti,
> http://www.alterracoffee.com/store/detail.aspx?ID=265&CategoryID=35&BaseID=32
> .
> Personally I've been traveling with my aeropress and hope that the
> hotel that I'll be staying in has hot water for tea. Which most do.
> Before the aeropress I traveled with a Nissan steel french press.
> Hope this helps.
> pz
>